Question Can i run an i9-9900kf with a semi passive cpu cooler?

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Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
No. TDP is calculated at base clocks on a standard cpu using specific nominal apps. Not Blender or rendering apps or other extreme usage apps. On 8 cores alone, no turbo, no boost, no hyperthreading. For all intents and purposes the TDP calculated on the 9900k is almost exactly the same as the 9700k since they are almost exactly the same cpu.

But that has no real bearing on power consumption or its limits on a cpu at stock configuration with hyperthreading enabled, turbo or boost enabled. For those figures you'll have to look at P1, P2 and Tau, TDP is essentially useless.
where it will not go above 119W TDP, NO MATTER WHAT.
No such thing. TDP is TDP, it's a set figure that does not change, the TDP of the 9900k is 95w,NO MATTER WHAT. Actual power consumption is something else entirely.

TDP for all intents and purposes = P1.
P2 = P1 * 1.25.
Tau = 8 seconds.

Cpu boosts initially upto P2 loads, and stays there for upto 8 seconds. If the load at that rate continues, power is dropped to P1 until the load is relinquished and the cpu sees an idle state of somewhere around 5 seconds or less.

When you enable hyperthreading and boost clocks, TDP ≠ P1, P1 is the maximum sustainable wattage according to voltage, temps, other factors. P1 can be 150w easily.

The 9900k is a dynamic cpu, constantly variable outputs, so basing thermal outputs based on power used does not work. A 150w capacity cooler will not handle the 200w+ thermal watts the 9900k is capable of producing, and staying within acceptable range unless core/voltage/speed use is shackled. Pretty pointless to buy such an expensive and capable cpu and locking it down to a 95w cap. In some games like CSGO, that's not going to hurt at all as individual core use won't add upto that 95w. But BF5, Starwars Battlefront II, or any number of high core, high thread multi-player online games will far exceed and demand far more than what gets shown from most every single player game benchmark.
 
May 24, 2020
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I don't think I would even use that motherboard with that processor, poor power delivery and cooling. That is Asus's lowest end model Z390.
Well, i didn't wanted that cpu to be honest, it's my first build and i know that many components are not exactly the best for it.
 
May 24, 2020
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No. TDP is calculated at base clocks on a standard cpu using specific nominal apps. Not Blender or rendering apps or other extreme usage apps. On 8 cores alone, no turbo, no boost, no hyperthreading. For all intents and purposes the TDP calculated on the 9900k is almost exactly the same as the 9700k since they are almost exactly the same cpu.

But that has no real bearing on power consumption or its limits on a cpu at stock configuration with hyperthreading enabled, turbo or boost enabled. For those figures you'll have to look at P1, P2 and Tau, TDP is essentially useless.

No such thing. TDP is TDP, it's a set figure that does not change, the TDP of the 9900k is 95w,NO MATTER WHAT. Actual power consumption is something else entirely.

TDP for all intents and purposes = P1.
P2 = P1 * 1.25.
Tau = 8 seconds.

Cpu boosts initially upto P2 loads, and stays there for upto 8 seconds. If the load at that rate continues, power is dropped to P1 until the load is relinquished and the cpu sees an idle state of somewhere around 5 seconds or less.

When you enable hyperthreading and boost clocks, TDP ≠ P1, P1 is the maximum sustainable wattage according to voltage, temps, other factors. P1 can be 150w easily.

The 9900k is a dynamic cpu, constantly variable outputs, so basing thermal outputs based on power used does not work. A 150w capacity cooler will not handle the 200w+ thermal watts the 9900k is capable of producing, and staying within acceptable range unless core/voltage/speed use is shackled. Pretty pointless to buy such an expensive and capable cpu and locking it down to a 95w cap. In some games like CSGO, that's not going to hurt at all as individual core use won't add upto that 95w. But BF5, Starwars Battlefront II, or any number of high core, high thread multi-player online games will far exceed and demand far more than what gets shown from most every single player game benchmark.
So with a Dark Rock pro 4 i'll be safe or that's not enough for normal gaming (like Forza Horizon, Assetto Corsa ecc).
 

Phaaze88

Splendid
Ambassador
So with a Dark Rock pro 4 i'll be safe or that's not enough for normal gaming (like Forza Horizon, Assetto Corsa ecc).
It'll be fine, with a couple of conditions:
1)In Nvidia Control Panel > Manage 3D Settings, make the following changes:
Power management mode: prefer max performance
Cap the fps to your monitor's native refresh. Leaving it unlimited just makes both cpu and gpu use more power.

2)Refrain from using fps monitors/counters as much as possible. Those things are poison.
 
May 24, 2020
8
0
10
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It'll be fine, with a couple of conditions:
1)In Nvidia Control Panel > Manage 3D Settings, make the following changes:
Power management mode: prefer max performance
Cap the fps to your monitor's native refresh. Leaving it unlimited just makes both cpu and gpu use more power.

2)Refrain from using fps monitors/counters as much as possible. Those things are poison.
Thanks. Do i have to add fans on the top for cooling the motherboard too? Since it's a cheap one
 

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