Question Can I use a 6 pin + 2 pin on a 8 pin slot for my new graphics card?

Jun 11, 2019
10
0
10
0
I'm sorry if there is any gramma mistakes. I have recently bought a new graphics card (Radeon nitro+ rx 570 8G) which has a 8 pin power slot plus a 6 pin slot for overclocking. My question is, can I use the 6 pin on the 8 pin? Or can I buy an adapter for the 6 pin + 2 pin to an 8 pin?
 

Metal Messiah.

Commendable
Mar 28, 2019
2,147
444
1,790
61
Nope. You need to buy a compatible PSU, having all the PCI-e connectors. Using MOLEX adapters isn't recommended either.

EDIT: Are you sure your GPU requires 1 8-pin +1 6-pin PCIe connector ? Which Power supply do you actually have ??
 
Last edited:
Jun 11, 2019
10
0
10
0
Thanks for the reply. Do you have any recommendations for a cheap but still a good quality PSU? Also, I have read in a reddit post that It should be fine as long as the PSU has enough power or I may have misunderstood the post. I don't exactly know if ths is my PSU's model but it says that it is a ATX 12v power supply with 600 w.
Link to the reddit post: https://www.reddit.com/r/nvidia/comments/42kqw2 View: https://www.reddit.com/r/nvidia/comments/42kqw2/the_dangers_of_using_a_6_pin_in_an_8_pin_slot/
 

Metal Messiah.

Commendable
Mar 28, 2019
2,147
444
1,790
61
I don't exactly know if ths is my PSU's model but it says that it is a ATX 12v power supply with 600 w.
No. There has to be some Brand name/model number of your PSU. Open your ATX cabinet, and check the PSU's label printed on the side of it. Take a pic, if possible. How many PCI/PEG connectors are there in your power supply model ?
 
Last edited:
Jun 11, 2019
10
0
10
0
Sorry for the late reply, I think that I might have solved the problem. A friend of mine suggested that I take another look at my 6 pin + 2 pin because he had the same situation with his graphics card. He suggested that the 6 and 2 pin can be combinded to the 8 pin by "sliding" it together. I have tried it before, but I gave op way too quick. It only worked when I had a closer look at it.
So now I should have the 8 pin slot to the card by combinding the 6 and the 2 pin and I think that it should work now. And thanks again for the replies and help :)
 
I have recently bought a new graphics card (Radeon nitro+ rx 570 8G) which has a 8 pin power slot plus a 6 pin slot for overclocking. My question is, can I use the 6 pin on the 8 pin? Or can I buy an adapter for the 6 pin + 2 pin to an 8 pin?
Both 8pin and 6pin cables have to be connected.
It is not enough to connect only one of them. If you do, then either card will switch into low power operating mode or you risk melting cables connecting to graphics card.
This is, what you're risking with:

Can you post photo of model info label on your PSU?
 
Last edited:

hang-the-9

Titan
Moderator
Sorry for the late reply, I think that I might have solved the problem. A friend of mine suggested that I take another look at my 6 pin + 2 pin because he had the same situation with his graphics card. He suggested that the 6 and 2 pin can be combinded to the 8 pin by "sliding" it together. I have tried it before, but I gave op way too quick. It only worked when I had a closer look at it.
So now I should have the 8 pin slot to the card by combinding the 6 and the 2 pin and I think that it should work now. And thanks again for the replies and help :)
Glad you got it sorted out, a big clue to that connector is that it's a 6+2 connector, which adds up to 8 hehe. They make them that way so they don't need separate cables for cards that need 6 or 8 pins. Most power supplies do the same thing for secondary CPU power with 4+4 conectors.
 
Jun 11, 2019
10
0
10
0
Both 8pin and 6pin cables have to be connected.
It is not enough to connect only one of them. If you do, then either card will switch into low power operating mode or you risk melting cables connecting to graphics card.
This is, what you're risking with:

Can you post photo of model info label on your PSU?
I don't know how to upload a picture on the forum with links and all that. In a video I saw about the graphics card, the guy said that you would only have to connect the 6 pin if you overclock the graphics card. I can also confirms that on the box it says "500W (or grater) power supply with minimum one X PCIE 8 pin power connector required. Connect to the additional PCIE 6 pin power connector for enhanced performance" and again, I don't know how to upload pictures.
Link to the vidoe, go to 1 min and 25 sec:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VBHS6sLnwhg
 
Jun 11, 2019
10
0
10
0
Glad you got it sorted out, a big clue to that connector is that it's a 6+2 connector, which adds up to 8 hehe. They make them that way so they don't need separate cables for cards that need 6 or 8 pins. Most power supplies do the same thing for secondary CPU power with 4+4 conectors.
Thanks :) It's my first time upgrading or changing parts in my PC, so I'm quite new at this. Never thought about GPU's having different kinds of power slots or the 2+6 pin can add up to 8, but yeah. I'm also pretty glad that it worked :))
 

DSzymborski

Illustrious
Moderator
It's not quite as bad as one may think. No, I wouldn't use this PSU as it was mediocre when new and the design is positively ancient at this point, but this was on an Andyson platform and not one of the really dire ones Andyson churned out for the bargain basement companies. I believe -- but am not positive -- that this platform used 105-degree Teapos, which while hardly elite, is a significant step up from the real crap you sometimes see.

Club 3D was only very briefly involved in the PSU market about a decade ago. They were far better known for their GPUs and were one of the earliest companies offering aftermarket versions of graphics cards, around the turn of the millennium. It's a small Dutch company and they eventually found it difficult keeping up with the large, more globally distributed brands. They mostly make connectors today and I don't believe they've made a GPU since the AMD RX 200 series.

But ignoring the history lecture, the cheapest PSU that tends to be recommendable is the various recent Corsair CX units. Note that if you see green letters on the power supply, it's a much older Corsair CX on a much worse platform that isn't recommendable.
 
Jun 11, 2019
10
0
10
0
It's not quite as bad as one may think. No, I wouldn't use this PSU as it was mediocre when new and the design is positively ancient at this point, but this was on an Andyson platform and not one of the really dire ones Andyson churned out for the bargain basement companies. I believe -- but am not positive -- that this platform used 105-degree Teapos, which while hardly elite, is a significant step up from the real crap you sometimes see.

Club 3D was only very briefly involved in the PSU market about a decade ago. They were far better known for their GPUs and were one of the earliest companies offering aftermarket versions of graphics cards, around the turn of the millennium. It's a small Dutch company and they eventually found it difficult keeping up with the large, more globally distributed brands. They mostly make connectors today and I don't believe they've made a GPU since the AMD RX 200 series.

But ignoring the history lecture, the cheapest PSU that tends to be recommendable is the various recent Corsair CX units. Note that if you see green letters on the power supply, it's a much older Corsair CX on a much worse platform that isn't recommendable.
I see. Thanks for the brief history lesson, it helps a lot to understand why you guys recommend a new PSU by knowing the history of my PSU. I got this PC from a friend of mine some years ago and didn't think much about upgrading it ontil now because it's really behind in terms of running all these modern games. I thought that by buying a decent, cheap and strong GPU, it could maybe run better. I never thought about the other things that comes with buying a more powerful GPU could be this messy. But yeah, I do see why it would be a really good idea to change the PSU. But can I still run this PC on my current PSU? or is it too risky?
 
The psu is not absolutely terrible. It has bunch of protections, 80+ certification.
Just keep in mind - it has only 430W on 12V rail (instead of marketed 600W).

Nitro+ Rx 570 8G alone eats up 195W. Rest of the system needs to draw less than 230W.
If you account for PSU aging, then rest of the system probably should not consume more than ~200W.

BTW - what are full system specs? I don't see that mentioned anywhere.

Although usually not recommended, you can get 6pin pcie connector with this type of adapter:
2x molex to pcie 6pin
 

DSzymborski

Illustrious
Moderator
I see. Thanks for the brief history lesson, it helps a lot to understand why you guys recommend a new PSU by knowing the history of my PSU. I got this PC from a friend of mine some years ago and didn't think much about upgrading it ontil now because it's really behind in terms of running all these modern games. I thought that by buying a decent, cheap and strong GPU, it could maybe run better. I never thought about the other things that comes with buying a more powerful GPU could be this messy. But yeah, I do see why it would be a really good idea to change the PSU. But can I still run this PC on my current PSU? or is it too risky?
I'd be OK with it if you were using something like a 750 Ti, but the RX 570 tends to be on the power-hungry side and I'd strongly recommend a new one, even though you can theoretically run it. These old PSUs tend to be quite terrible at dealing with crossloads. Modern PSUs essentially start with +12V power and then generate the minor rails, allowing everything to be independently regulated. It's much safer for your power-hungry equipment.
 
Jun 11, 2019
10
0
10
0
The psu is not absolutely terrible. It has bunch of protections, 80+ certification.
Just keep in mind - it has only 430W on 12V rail (instead of marketed 600W).

Nitro+ Rx 570 8G alone eats up 195W. Rest of the system needs to draw less than 230W.
If you account for PSU aging, then rest of the system probably should not consume more than ~200W.

BTW - what are full system specs? I don't see that mentioned anywhere.

Although usually not recommended, you can get 6pin pcie connector with this type of adapter:
2x molex to pcie 6pin
I have a AMD FX(tm)-6100 Six-core Processor
16G Ram, don't know where they are from
Windows 10
Ehm don't know what else you might want to know
 
Jun 11, 2019
10
0
10
0
I'd be OK with it if you were using something like a 750 Ti, but the RX 570 tends to be on the power-hungry side and I'd strongly recommend a new one, even though you can theoretically run it. These old PSUs tend to be quite terrible at dealing with crossloads. Modern PSUs essentially start with +12V power and then generate the minor rails, allowing everything to be independently regulated. It's much safer for your power-hungry equipment.
I see. I'm taking your advice to buy a new PSU. I was thinking about buying the Corsair CX650, 650W or is it overkill? Or is it okay to have a little bit extra power.
I'm considering the Corsair CX650, 650W or the Corsair CX550, 550W version, what do you think?
 
Last edited:
Jun 11, 2019
10
0
10
0
AMD FX-6100 - that's another 95W, add motherboard ~35W, drives, ram.
Yeah - better get a new PSU. You're getting dangerously close to max that PSU can handle.
Yeah I'm also considering buying a new CPU (AMD Fx 8350, I know it's not that new but from what I have seen, it's still pretty beefy) and a new cooler instead of the stock CPU cooler. But yeah I'm taking your guys advice and buy a new PSU when I buy the CPU and the cooler.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS