Question Can I use larger RAM sticks than specified in my motherboard's support list?

Sep 10, 2019
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Hi, I've been thinking of upgrading my RAM as I recently also bought a better GPU for my gaming computer. The recommended amount for the GTX 1070 TI AERO 8g is 16 gb but I currently have 3 2GB DDR3 sticks (CM3X2G1333C9DHX) running triple channel on my PC.

My motherboard is a X58A-UD5 (rev 2.0) and its memory specifications are the following:

  1. 6 x 1.5V DDR3 DIMM sockets supporting up to 24 GB of system memory(Note 1)
  2. Dual/3 channel memory architecture
  3. Support for DDR3 2200/1333/1066/800 MHz memory modules
  4. Support for non-ECC memory modules
  5. Support for Extreme Memory Profile (XMP) memory modules
I was thinking of purchasing 2-3 8GB DDR3 RAM sticks and replacing the previous ones with these. On the motherboard's memory support list however the highest memory size per stick was 4GB. Would I encounter any problems in doing this?
 
The support list is what they tested and certified worked for sure when the board was new. There probably weren't any 8GB sticks in 2009 when it was made, and finding any stick on that list for sale 10 years later would be near impossible.

The memory controller in 1st gen Core CPUs can only handle up to 4 gigabit low-density memory chips. 16 chips on a stick is 64 gigabits or 8GB per stick. So theoretically it could work if you can find low density sticks (that is, 8GB sticks with 16 chips instead of 8).

In practice it's a bit trial-and-error if it works so find a place with a good return policy.
 
Reactions: gskill support
Sep 10, 2019
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Alright, I'll play it safe and go with the 4GB sticks then. I've read on the net that the motherboard memory support list doesn't include all the possible choices that could work with it. Am I correct in assuming that as long as I pick something in the 2200/1333/1066/800 MHz range and have all my sticks be the exact same type then replacing the RAM should work out?
 
4GB sticks does not remove the requirement for low-density chips. You need to find 4GB sticks with either 8 or 16 chips on them.

If it's the latter, then they would be the extremely low-density 2Gbit chips that can also be used on Core 2 chipsets. DDR3 has been around for a dozen years now, so it can only be expected that there are going to be spec changes over time and thus compatibility issues with later RAM on earlier hardware.

The link I provided earlier shows that 48GB can work even if it's technically not supported.
 

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