Can someone please point out the difference in mems

sebastian869

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Jan 5, 2009
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What is the difference between kingston for ex between these 2 versions.


One version: 6GB 1600MHz DDR3 Non-ECC CL9 (9-9-9-27) DIMM (Kit of 3) XMP



And the other : 6GB 1066MHz DDR3 ECC Reg w/Par CL7 DIMM (Kit of 3) SR, x4 w/Therm Sen

P.S. Speed not included unless it plays a critical role.

Also, Can someone please help me out with which type of CAS speed is best (the lower the better or vice versa).

Lastly, Home come some DDR3s have a kit of 2 rather then 3 I always thought that ddr3 has to be a 3 chips.


Thanks,
Sebastian
 

Fruity

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Feb 20, 2009
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Low CAS numbers are better, although typically frequency plays a far greater role.

The ECC (Error Correcting Code) is a system whereby the RAM checks the output to make sure that it is correct. Great stuff for servers and other high reliability systems but not normally needed for home systems. Gaming systems can benefit. It does slow the RAM down a bit since it's another operation that needs to be performed on the data. If you want super-high dependability for your system then by all means use it (make sure your mobo supports ECC RAM).

The 'Registered' means that there is a Register to delay the data processing in the RAM until all information is available at the beginning fo a clkock cycle. Again, slows the system down. Probs not use at all on home systems. If you do go with it then make sure your mobo supports it. Registered memory is also sometimes called 'Buffered' memory.

DDR3 is availalable to use in kits of three if it is 'triple channel'. This requires a specific mobo chipset to utilise the feature (e.g. the Intel X58 chipset). If your mobo doesn't support triple channel then using 2 / 4 sticks will still get some performance advantage over DDR2.
 

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