Sep 11, 2021
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Hey folks, I just built my pc some weeks ago (main specs below), and I'm facing some problems that I don't know exactly what the source cause is. By default, the memory speed on the BIOS is set to 2133MHz, and two similar XMP profiles are available at 3000MHz. I have tried to set memory speed up to 3400MHz (just for testing purpose) and I have no performance issues at all (even passed some stability tests) and no freezes/bsod - unless I'm playing. And that's the main issue: for gaming only 2133MHz will work, anything beyond that and the game will crash (for adrenalin 6.2 it crashes to a timeout bug report message error, and for adrenalin 8.2 the system freezes completely and I have to manually reset it). It's interesting to note that 2667 (which is a non-oc speed for the mobo) is way more instable than 3000, and game will crash even before the login screen is loaded. For 3000 I can play for a few minutes (about 5-15) before it crashes. Since it only happens when I'm gaming, could it be a hardware problem with the memory, or maybe the iGPU, that is preventing me from using my memory kit at its original speed?

I've tried windows fresh installation, all drivers are updated, same for windows. For graphics I've tried adrenalin 21.6.1, 6.2, 8.1 and 8.2, the only difference is how the crash is handled, but it crashes anyway. BIOS is updated - H.50. Temperature is not an issue (cpu max ~71C gpu max ~55C when gaming)

Specs:
  • Mobo MSI B450 Tomahawk Max II (highest memory speed non-OC: 2667, up to 4133 OC mode)
  • AMD Ryzen 5600G
  • Memory kit Corsair Vengeance LPX (DDR4 2x8gb 3000MHz) - CMK16GXM2D3000C16
  • PSU Corsair CV450
Any help is appreciated!!
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
First, I'd avoid trying to clock the memory past it's XMP profile/Advertised speed.

Unless you have extensive experience with actually "overclocking" memory, which requires significant, lengthy testing, to establish stability (And memory instability is nothing to play around with. If you've run your system for any period of time with unstable memory there are likely already micro errors that have been introduced into your file system and game files if anything from that period of time was saved to disk.), then it is advisable to ONLY run the memory at it's XMP profile speed or lower, for most people.

Many Ryzen systems WON'T run at 3000mhz, and users historically have often had to run the memory at a minor reduction of 2933mhz, or an increased frequency (OC, not recommended unless you're willing to put in the work to establish stability) of 3200mhz, but mostly that was on older chipsets (Which yours is) and first or second Gen Ryzen platforms. On a B450 chipset board, which was primarily the most common one for 2nd Gen Ryzen, even with a newer CPU, there could be some similar limitations but I think primarily it's because the majority of the LPX memory kits were designed with Intel favored configuration and timings.

You could certainly try it at 2933mhz with the same timings meant for 3000mhz operation, or use the Ryzen calculator to try and figure out timings that are more favorable for your memory kit and platform.

Since Corsair doesn't yet show any memory compatibility on the Corsair memory finder for that board, and MSI doesn't show any specific memory compatibility by way of QVL list for the 5xxx series processors, it's impossible to even guess as to whether this memory kit might officially have been considered compatible, and therefore couldn't have been assumed to be compatible, but I'm highly skeptical about it's compatibility due to the fact, like I said before, that almost unilaterally Ryzen platforms have had problems with LPX memory kits.

So you can try, as outlined above, but I think your best best would be to look at getting a G.Skill Neos or Trident Z kit. Maybe try one of the kits that ARE listed on the MSI QVL list for that board, for the 3xxx series CPUs, since they don't have any QVL listings for that board for the 5xxx series processors at this time.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
To begin with, most Ryzen platforms don't like running Vengeance LPX memory kits, so keep that in mind. We've seen instance after instance where a Ryzen platform owner simply could not get an LPX kit to work with their Ryzen platform. Some HAVE been able to get them to work, so the issue may be somewhat related to whether the board itself likes it or not, but largely this is a Ryzen IMC issue because those LPX kits pretty much always work on the majority of Intel based systems.

Assuming that isn't the problem (Which I wouldn't do, really), the first thing to do is make sure you have the MOST current motherboard BIOS version installed. If you don't, do it.

Further, starting at the CPU and moving to the right towards the edge of the motherboard, 1, 2, 3, 4, which EXACT slots do you have your DIMMs installed in? Yes, this can AND does, make a difference, regardless of whether it's an AMD or Intel platform.
 
Reactions: gelkim
Sep 11, 2021
2
0
10
0
To begin with, most Ryzen platforms don't like running Vengeance LPX memory kits, so keep that in mind. We've seen instance after instance where a Ryzen platform owner simply could not get an LPX kit to work with their Ryzen platform. Some HAVE been able to get them to work, so the issue may be somewhat related to whether the board itself likes it or not, but largely this is a Ryzen IMC issue because those LPX kits pretty much always work on the majority of Intel based systems.

Assuming that isn't the problem (Which I wouldn't do, really), the first thing to do is make sure you have the MOST current motherboard BIOS version installed. If you don't, do it.

Further, starting at the CPU and moving to the right towards the edge of the motherboard, 1, 2, 3, 4, which EXACT slots do you have your DIMMs installed in? Yes, this can AND does, make a difference, regardless of whether it's an AMD or Intel platform.
Hey @Darkbreeze thanks for your reply!

I have the latest version of the BIOS version available for my mobo installed (7C02vH5). For the memory slots, I'm using 2 and 4. From what you said I believe this incompatibility thing can be the issue... In this case, does it make sense for it to work fine in most scenarios other than playing games? And lastly, from the specs, was it supposed to actually work at 3000MHz?
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
First, I'd avoid trying to clock the memory past it's XMP profile/Advertised speed.

Unless you have extensive experience with actually "overclocking" memory, which requires significant, lengthy testing, to establish stability (And memory instability is nothing to play around with. If you've run your system for any period of time with unstable memory there are likely already micro errors that have been introduced into your file system and game files if anything from that period of time was saved to disk.), then it is advisable to ONLY run the memory at it's XMP profile speed or lower, for most people.

Many Ryzen systems WON'T run at 3000mhz, and users historically have often had to run the memory at a minor reduction of 2933mhz, or an increased frequency (OC, not recommended unless you're willing to put in the work to establish stability) of 3200mhz, but mostly that was on older chipsets (Which yours is) and first or second Gen Ryzen platforms. On a B450 chipset board, which was primarily the most common one for 2nd Gen Ryzen, even with a newer CPU, there could be some similar limitations but I think primarily it's because the majority of the LPX memory kits were designed with Intel favored configuration and timings.

You could certainly try it at 2933mhz with the same timings meant for 3000mhz operation, or use the Ryzen calculator to try and figure out timings that are more favorable for your memory kit and platform.

Since Corsair doesn't yet show any memory compatibility on the Corsair memory finder for that board, and MSI doesn't show any specific memory compatibility by way of QVL list for the 5xxx series processors, it's impossible to even guess as to whether this memory kit might officially have been considered compatible, and therefore couldn't have been assumed to be compatible, but I'm highly skeptical about it's compatibility due to the fact, like I said before, that almost unilaterally Ryzen platforms have had problems with LPX memory kits.

So you can try, as outlined above, but I think your best best would be to look at getting a G.Skill Neos or Trident Z kit. Maybe try one of the kits that ARE listed on the MSI QVL list for that board, for the 3xxx series CPUs, since they don't have any QVL listings for that board for the 5xxx series processors at this time.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
And in the event at some point if you decide you DO want to overclock memory, or simply have other memory issues, I have MY preferred memory testing guidelines and also some troubleshooting advice that can be found here:

 

ASK THE COMMUNITY