Question Choosing between two different X570 boards

amulsingh01

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May 29, 2016
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The two boards I'm currently looking at for my 3800x are the ASUS x570 TUF ($165) and the Aorus Elite ($200). Both have the features I need but I want to know which one is the higher quality (VRMs, etc.) and worth the money since there's a gap in the price. I'm also reading that the Aorus has Intel LAN which is vastly superior to the Realtek in the ASUS, but I honestly don't know how significance the quality difference is between the two. Thanks for any input.
 

Newtonius

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Sep 25, 2019
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Power delivery is the same, however the Aorus elite only has a single 8pin CPU connector, this won't make much a difference however. I overclock my 3900X with only 8 pins in my x570 taichi.

Everything else is the same except for the ethernet as you mentioned and the m.2. If you were planning on getting an NVMe, the elite comes with a heatsink for the top M.2 slot. And ideally you want a heatsink with an M.2. However if the one you plan to buy comes with one then you need not worry.
 

QwerkyPengwen

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Herald
along with what Newtonius said, if you are planning to overclock, ASUS has the better BIOS for such things as well.

so many more features and fine tuning available with an ASUS BIOS.

And yeah, also like they said, unless you are going to get NVME m.2 (or an m.2 in general) then I would just go with the ASUS board.

LAN is LAN.
Sure, there can be minor little improvements on the chip that can help handle packets and whatnot more efficiently for a little tighter ping in online games, but honestly it's not actually that different nor does it give you any kind of real edge in online competitive games.

It's just mostly a marketing thing to make you go "ooh" and "ahh" and think that you are getting better when you really aren't (technically you are, based solely on numbers and on paper, but real world it's such a small difference that it's marginal at best) and so you just get hit with the placebo effect from it.

What's important when it comes to a motherboard are the following:

Basics:
Does it have support for main basic hardware features that you plan to use?
Such as:
Does it have a LAN port that's gigabit capable?
Does it have enough USB ports?
Does it have enough if any USB ports of a certain type that you would require? (i.e. USB 3.0/3.1, Type C, Thunderbolt, etc.)
Does it have enough SATA connectors for what you may need to plug in via that method?
Does it have built in WiFi/Bluetooth? (assuming that you would want that)
Does it have front panel USB or USB 3 header? (assuming you need it based on your choice of case)

And as for the advanced checklist, it goes like this:
Do you want to overclock?
If yes then the following:
Can it overclock?
Does it have enough power phase delivery to meet your needs? (more is better)
(as stated above, does it have more EPS power pins for more juice in general?)
And of course, when it comes to overclocking, how good is the BIOS for letting you fine tune and push the OC?
And as I already stated, ASUS is one of the best.
Especially when it comes to the more budget friendly options, as pretty much everyone else always cheaps out on these things but ASUS likes to stay strong and just give you everything but the kitchen sink.


Everything else is a luxury on a motherboard when picking one out and should be considered last.
Things like NVME support.
Onboard RGB headers.
Extra PCIe slots.
Extra Extra fan headers.
etc. etc.
Stuff that isn't super important but is probably nice or cool to have (and usually ends up costing you more money in the process)
 
Reactions: GarrettL

GarrettL

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Dec 4, 2019
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along with what Newtonius said, if you are planning to overclock, ASUS has the better BIOS for such things as well.

so many more features and fine tuning available with an ASUS BIOS.

And yeah, also like they said, unless you are going to get NVME m.2 (or an m.2 in general) then I would just go with the ASUS board.

LAN is LAN.
Sure, there can be minor little improvements on the chip that can help handle packets and whatnot more efficiently for a little tighter ping in online games, but honestly it's not actually that different nor does it give you any kind of real edge in online competitive games.

It's just mostly a marketing thing to make you go "ooh" and "ahh" and think that you are getting better when you really aren't (technically you are, based solely on numbers and on paper, but real world it's such a small difference that it's marginal at best) and so you just get hit with the placebo effect from it.

What's important when it comes to a motherboard are the following:

Basics:
Does it have support for main basic hardware features that you plan to use?
Such as:
Does it have a LAN port that's gigabit capable?
Does it have enough USB ports?
Does it have enough if any USB ports of a certain type that you would require? (i.e. USB 3.0/3.1, Type C, Thunderbolt, etc.)
Does it have enough SATA connectors for what you may need to plug in via that method?
Does it have built in WiFi/Bluetooth? (assuming that you would want that)
Does it have front panel USB or USB 3 header? (assuming you need it based on your choice of case)

And as for the advanced checklist, it goes like this:
Do you want to overclock?
If yes then the following:
Can it overclock?
Does it have enough power phase delivery to meet your needs? (more is better)
(as stated above, does it have more EPS power pins for more juice in general?)
And of course, when it comes to overclocking, how good is the BIOS for letting you fine tune and push the OC?
And as I already stated, ASUS is one of the best.
Especially when it comes to the more budget friendly options, as pretty much everyone else always cheaps out on these things but ASUS likes to stay strong and just give you everything but the kitchen sink.


Everything else is a luxury on a motherboard when picking one out and should be considered last.
Things like NVME support.
Onboard RGB headers.
Extra PCIe slots.
Extra Extra fan headers.
etc. etc.
Stuff that isn't super important but is probably nice or cool to have (and usually ends up costing you more money in the process)
Perfect summary.

So far my Asus TUF has been issue and trouble free. The WiFi is plenty quick too.
 

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