[SOLVED] clone or fresh install?

BradHP

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Oct 17, 2011
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I'm replacing the cpu, motherboard (going from Intel to AMD if that makes a big difference), and memory and also adding an SSD as the boot drive. But I plan to keep the old HDD for storage and to run some less intensive programs.

Will I avoid a lot of headaches by just starting with a fresh install of Windows 10 on the SSD? Can I easily remove Win 10 from the old HDD later? New SSD is 1TB, current drive is also 1TB with about 400 GB free (I can clean some of that up easily and get at least 500 GB).

What's the best process for this?
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Clean install. Yes, you WILL avoid a lot of headaches. Also, you need to do the clean install in a specific manner for best results. Specifically, make sure the BIOS settings are configured to ensure a FULL UEFI installation, rather than a legacy installation, and that there are NO drives except the drive being installed TO and the drive being installed FROM are attached to the system at the time of installation. Failing to do those things may result in untold headaches later, at best.

There are also activation concerns, so it would be in your best interests to read ALL of these before making any kind of move forward unless you are already FULLY aware of the reasons.

 
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Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Clean install. Yes, you WILL avoid a lot of headaches. Also, you need to do the clean install in a specific manner for best results. Specifically, make sure the BIOS settings are configured to ensure a FULL UEFI installation, rather than a legacy installation, and that there are NO drives except the drive being installed TO and the drive being installed FROM are attached to the system at the time of installation. Failing to do those things may result in untold headaches later, at best.

There are also activation concerns, so it would be in your best interests to read ALL of these before making any kind of move forward unless you are already FULLY aware of the reasons.

 
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The only time that you should utilize a clone install is when upgrading the storage solution on an otherwise unchanged hardware configuration, and or something like an emergency hardware swap in some other situations. When you change out the entire system at that base a level....Windows 10 is amazing about finding drivers and such to work, and boot, but you are far more likely to chase issues with your build thereafter and up till a clean install.
 
Sep 5, 2020
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I opted for the chuck my HDD in another system and hope for the best option not so long ago. As much as I was surprised how windows set up all the hardware without blue screening! I wasn't surprised at how slow and unresponsive windows had become afterwards. I guess it's just not ment to be.
 

USAFRet

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I opted for the chuck my HDD in another system and hope for the best option not so long ago. As much as I was surprised how windows set up all the hardware without blue screening! I wasn't surprised at how slow and unresponsive windows had become afterwards. I guess it's just not ment to be.
3 possibilities:
  1. It boots up just fine
  2. It fails completely
  3. It boots up, but you're chasing issues for weeks/months.
I've seen all 3.

Some people WILL say "No problem, just do it. It always works." We've seen those comments.
Speaking from their experience of doing it once, between almost identical hardware.

With all new hardware, a clean install is always recommended, usually required.
 
Sep 5, 2020
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3 possibilities:
  1. It boots up just fine
  2. It fails completely
  3. It boots up, but you're chasing issues for weeks/months.
I've seen all 3.

Some people WILL say "No problem, just do it. It always works." We've seen those comments.
Speaking from their experience of doing it once, between almost identical hardware.

With all new hardware, a clean install is always recommended, usually required.
I've always faced possibilities 2 and 3 I totally agree with the clean install. Even the windows upgrade has never been satisfactory.
 

BradHP

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Oct 17, 2011
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Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
No, use the media creation tool. In the BIOS, disable CSM (Compatibility support module), UNLESS you are using some older non-UEFI compatible hardware in the build, like very old graphics or other old add in cards.

On some systems there might be other UEFI relevant settings available as well. Some boards might REQUIRE that Secure boot is enabled for a full UEFI non-legacy Windows installation. In some cases it is simply recommended that you enable secure boot if you are going to perform a new, clean, UEFI Windows installation. Certainly it's not a requirement, but it does offer SOME additional protections against various types of attacks.
 
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