Question Computer keeps restarting but only with headphones in it seems...

Aug 11, 2020
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Ok so please read everything carefully as this is quite a long and tedious journey but hopefully everything I say here may offer some clues...

So a couple weeks ago I decided to upgrade my motherboard because my old one had some broken slots that wouldn't allow for more than 8 gigs of RAM ( I will post specs below) so anyway since then I've been having this problem with my computer where it just randomly restarts, it could be 5 hours into playing a game or it could be 10 minutes, it just restarts. So eventually after trying various fixes I got tired of it and took it to a computer shop. I had it there for three days and was told that all my hardware was fine and compatible and the software was good as well. The strangest thing is, it didn't restart once while it was under their care. They ran movies on it all night, they ran games on it for several hours, they ran benchmarks etc. It didn't restart once and that's the biggest point. They suggested running it without anything but a keyboard and mouse plugged in because that worked for them, but besides that I was told that maybe it was my outlet (but that wasn't the case because it only started after installing the new motherboard. So anyway I replaced the power strip and it still restarted. I think I've narrowed it down to headphones that cause the problem....


Now let me go over everything I've tried to fix this so we don't get any repeats and I'll post my specs

Solutions:
New psu
Removing ram
Booting on safe mode
Disabling auto restart
_-----------------------

Those are most of the solutions I've tried, and before I post my specs, all hardware is compatible and fine


CPU: AMD FX 8320
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-880GM-usb3
Ram: 16 gigs mixture of pny and Kingston
Graphics card: EVGA gtx 1050 ti mini


Like I said I'm pretty sure it's headphone related so any ways to fix this would be very nice! Thanks!
 

novathunder

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The computer shop tested it like they launched a movie and went to work on another computer. They ran games for hours (ahem) but it's your computer, only you do really push it, let's suppose a normal usage: while you game, you listen to music, you got chrome and a few tabs up, discord is running in background, and you are downloading a few torrent, + windows can do updates anytime. They won't test it like that for a full day, they test something like a synthetic benchmark and while it runs they work on another computer. I am not saying they didn't do their job correctly, just that you are gonna push it far more using real-life usage than what they could do.

Let's get back to the computer. Tell us more about the headphones thing. Please how did you narrowed down to the headphones being the culprit?

I'm curious cause it happened on a few of my old computers over time making them crash randomly or forcing me to use another jack or usb port. Let me explain a bit: at home my couches are synthetic (polyester, and leather imitation) and I got a cat that rolls from excitement on it and on beds, getting all my things electrically charged. Knowing that electricity needs 10000 volts to travels 1mm in thin air. When you "felt" a static discharge it means that you transfered more than 15000 volts, else you wouldn't sense it at all. So for you to "sense" the discharge, the spark have to measure more than 1.5mm, often times I get electrostatic discharge in the 30000-35000V range or more. (You can see these sparks in the dark with all the lights off while you remove clothes from dryer)

Ok we know that what does it do? When I touch say the monitor's button I often transfer a big electrostatic discharge that goes right through behind the button (it got an electronic board under the button i'd say 1mm behind it.) I fried soooooo many monitors, motherboards, USB ports AND, you guessed it, motherboard headphone/microphone jacks. Over time I got sooooo many computers that had malfunctioning or simply fried jacks and USB ports.

There is nothing you can do once 35000V travelled through the headphone jack right through your motherboard and frying electricity lanes on the motherboard here and there. That kind of discharge makes sparks able to jump from ever so tight electric lanes on the motherboard and destroys them in the process. Nowadays AMD is using 7nm distanciation between lanes. A human hair is around 75 microns (abbreviated 75μm) or 75,000nm (nanometers) in diameter. A weak 15000V electrostatic discharge will travel 1.5 million nanometers away into thin air. Your cpu is 32nm the motherboard must be in that range too meaning the discharge will destroy all the electronic components it passes through until it gets caught by the PSU then discharged into the wall, also damaging the PSU in the process. A spark can even short different parallel lanes forever meaning electricity now travels in another direction, which leads to potentially any bug.

Intel complained 15 years ago that cpus that were RMA were analysed and some would miscalculate and give wrong answers and they couldn't explain it. If you ask the cpu 2+2 and it answers -32768 we got a problem. 😋

Ok long story, sorry about that I must be tired 😃⚡💤. Tell me more about the headphones story.
 
Last edited:
Aug 11, 2020
21
0
10
0
The computer shop tested it like they launched a movie and went to work on another computer. They ran games for hours (ahem) but it's your computer, only you do really push it, let's suppose a normal usage: while you game, you listen to music, you got chrome and a few tabs up, discord is running in background, and you are downloading a few torrent, + windows can do updates anytime. They won't test it like that for a full day, they test something like a synthetic benchmark and while it runs they work on another computer. I am not saying they didn't do their job correctly, just that you are gonna push it far more using real-life usage than what they could do.

Let's get back to the computer. Tell us more about the headphones thing. Please how did you narrowed down to the headphones being the culprit?

I'm curious cause it happened on a few of my old computers over time making them crash randomly or forcing me to use another jack or usb port. Let me explain a bit: at home my couches are synthetic (polyester, and leather imitation) and I got a cat that rolls from excitement on it and on beds, getting all my things electrically charged. Knowing that electricity needs 10000 volts to travels 1mm in thin air. When you "felt" a static discharge it means that you transfered more than 15000 volts, else you wouldn't sense it at all. So for you to "sense" the discharge, the spark have to measure more than 1.5mm, often times I get electrostatic discharge in the 30000-35000V range or more. (You can see these sparks in the dark with all the lights off while you remove clothes from dryer)

Ok we know that what does it do? When I touch say the monitor's button I often transfer a big electrostatic discharge that goes right through behind the button (it got an electronic board under the button i'd say 1mm behind it.) I fried soooooo many monitors, motherboards, USB ports AND, you guessed it, motherboard headphone/microphone jacks. Over time I got sooooo many computers that had malfunctioning or simply fried jacks and USB ports.

There is nothing you can do once 35000V travelled through the headphone jack right through your motherboard and frying electricity lanes on the motherboard here and there. That kind of discharge makes sparks able to jump from ever so tight electric lanes on the motherboard and destroys them in the process. Nowadays AMD is using 7nm distanciation between lanes. A human hair is around 75 microns (abbreviated 75μm) or 75,000nm (nanometers) in diameter. A weak 15000V electrostatic discharge will travel 1.5 million nanometers away into thin air. Your cpu is 32nm the motherboard must be in that range too meaning the discharge will destroy all the electronic components it passes through until it gets caught by the PSU then discharged into the wall, also damaging the PSU in the process. A spark can even short different parallel lanes forever meaning electricity now travels in another direction, which leads to potentially any bug.

Intel complained 15 years ago that cpus that were RMA were analysed and some would miscalculate and give wrong answers and they couldn't explain it. If you ask the cpu 2+2 and it answers -32768 we got a problem. 😋

Ok long story, sorry about that I must be tired 😃⚡💤. Tell me more about the headphones story.
Actually they did test it accurately to my situation. My PC is never pushed very hard and I know for a fact it isn't an overheating problem, that's why I think it's headphone related
 
Aug 11, 2020
21
0
10
0
The computer shop tested it like they launched a movie and went to work on another computer. They ran games for hours (ahem) but it's your computer, only you do really push it, let's suppose a normal usage: while you game, you listen to music, you got chrome and a few tabs up, discord is running in background, and you are downloading a few torrent, + windows can do updates anytime. They won't test it like that for a full day, they test something like a synthetic benchmark and while it runs they work on another computer. I am not saying they didn't do their job correctly, just that you are gonna push it far more using real-life usage than what they could do.

Let's get back to the computer. Tell us more about the headphones thing. Please how did you narrowed down to the headphones being the culprit?

I'm curious cause it happened on a few of my old computers over time making them crash randomly or forcing me to use another jack or usb port. Let me explain a bit: at home my couches are synthetic (polyester, and leather imitation) and I got a cat that rolls from excitement on it and on beds, getting all my things electrically charged. Knowing that electricity needs 10000 volts to travels 1mm in thin air. When you "felt" a static discharge it means that you transfered more than 15000 volts, else you wouldn't sense it at all. So for you to "sense" the discharge, the spark have to measure more than 1.5mm, often times I get electrostatic discharge in the 30000-35000V range or more. (You can see these sparks in the dark with all the lights off while you remove clothes from dryer)

Ok we know that what does it do? When I touch say the monitor's button I often transfer a big electrostatic discharge that goes right through behind the button (it got an electronic board under the button i'd say 1mm behind it.) I fried soooooo many monitors, motherboards, USB ports AND, you guessed it, motherboard headphone/microphone jacks. Over time I got sooooo many computers that had malfunctioning or simply fried jacks and USB ports.

There is nothing you can do once 35000V travelled through the headphone jack right through your motherboard and frying electricity lanes on the motherboard here and there. That kind of discharge makes sparks able to jump from ever so tight electric lanes on the motherboard and destroys them in the process. Nowadays AMD is using 7nm distanciation between lanes. A human hair is around 75 microns (abbreviated 75μm) or 75,000nm (nanometers) in diameter. A weak 15000V electrostatic discharge will travel 1.5 million nanometers away into thin air. Your cpu is 32nm the motherboard must be in that range too meaning the discharge will destroy all the electronic components it passes through until it gets caught by the PSU then discharged into the wall, also damaging the PSU in the process. A spark can even short different parallel lanes forever meaning electricity now travels in another direction, which leads to potentially any bug.

Intel complained 15 years ago that cpus that were RMA were analysed and some would miscalculate and give wrong answers and they couldn't explain it. If you ask the cpu 2+2 and it answers -32768 we got a problem. 😋

Ok long story, sorry about that I must be tired 😃⚡💤. Tell me more about the headphones story.
Also I narrowed it down to headphones because of the fact that it didn't restart once for them I will make sure here soon by not having headphones in but they had a mouse and keyboard plugged in so it isn't that. I have no clue why the headphones would be doing that though because it happens with both my expensive headset and my cheap earbuds
 

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