Question Cores vs clockspeed

Dec 5, 2019
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I am new to all this but I really have a question .
There are two CPUs A and B with same core count hyper threads and clock speed on all cores . But CPU A is few gen older than B .
Will there be any difference in the performance of two and why.
Does Cache (or anything else I don't know about , sorry) makes a difference !?
 

PC Tailor

Distinguished
Herald
Welcome to the forums my friend!

As above stated, typically the newer gens perform better with current applications and are often more power to performance efficient.
What specific CPUs are you referring to? as cores and clockspeeds are not the only factors to consider in a CPU.
 

cdrkf

Honorable
I am new to all this but I really have a question .
There are two CPUs A and B with same core count hyper threads and clock speed on all cores . But CPU A is few gen older than B .
Will there be any difference in the performance of two and why.
Does Cache (or anything else I don't know about , sorry) makes a difference !?
It's a little difficult to say without knowing which CPUs you are talking about....

as a generalisation if we say CPU A is the older part and CPU B is newer, cpu B should be faster even with the same core / thread count and clock speed due to newer architecture- as the newer design should have higher 'IPC' (instructions per clock- i.e. it is more efficient and can do more in the same number of clock cycles as the older design).

Where it gets tricky is for the past few generations Intel has reused the same design in multiple generations.... their 'Skylake' core first launched with the 6000 series, and is still used in the newest 9000 series parts, albeit the newer parts offer more cores and higher clocks but clock for clock, core for core they are the same.
 
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Dec 5, 2019
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It's a little difficult to say without knowing which CPUs you are talking about....

as a generalisation if we say CPU A is the older part and CPU B is newer, cpu B should be faster even with the same core / thread count and clock speed due to newer architecture- as the newer design should have higher 'IPC' (instructions per clock- i.e. it is more efficient and can do more in the same number of clock cycles as the older design).

Where it gets tricky is for the past few generations Intel has reused the same design in multiple generations.... their 'Skylake' core first launched with the 6000 series, and is still used in the newest 9000 series parts, albeit the newer parts offer more cores and higher clocks but clock for clock, core for core they are the same.
Taking the amd ryzen into account .... R7 1700 and 2700 are almost same I guess but have significantly different price .
And surprisingly 1700 varient is more expensive as listed on partspicker
 
Dec 5, 2019
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2nd Gen Ryzen went down massively on the release of 3rd Gen.
The 2700 is better than the 1700. Not much, but better.
so it doesn't matter what gen I buy ...
And can you help me with one more thing how do I select my motherboard the the CPU because there are just so many out there ranging totally different in prices
 

RodroX

Notable
Aug 4, 2019
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Well it does matter what gen you get.

Between first and second gen Ryzen theres not a huge diference, but 3rd gen Ryzen have a new 7nm node, more L3 cache, and a lots of improvements on ipc.
In short between the first two gens, pick the best value. But if you have can spend more money on 3rd gen its worth it and comparable to the best intel can do at this point.

But not knowing what you need the CPU for, it gets hard to tell which one may suit you better (or be enough for the task you have in mind).

Cheers
 
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cdrkf

Honorable
so it doesn't matter what gen I buy ...
And can you help me with one more thing how do I select my motherboard the the CPU because there are just so many out there ranging totally different in prices
It depends on what you are doing- if rendering or other production tasks the difference is small, however second gen ryzen is somewhat better for gaming than first thanks to higher multi core boost clocks, reduced latency thanks to cache improvements and the ability to support faster ram.

You can also push 2nd gen ryzen to higher overclocks than first- first gen usually tops out around 3.9 to 4.0 ghz, you shouldn't have an issue getting a 2700 up to 4.1, maybe 4.2 with a good cooler.
 

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