COuple of Questions

fruees

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Hey guys, I have my Q6660 clocked to 3.2 and has been fine and never given me a problem since I built it 6 months ago. I just have a few general queries and was wondering if you guys could help me out:
1. I was randomly looking at CPU-Z and came across this memory part; when I saw what it said I was baffled because i have 1066mhz memory and this thing says its at 534. The FSB:DRAM is 2:3 and am at 5-5-5-15. FSB is 356.0 x9
2. how to properly read my voltages:
According to CPU-Z Core Voltage is 1.39, but if I go to Speedfan 4.35, it says VCore is 1.63 and CPUcore is 1.39 - I thought Vcore was CPU core, pls correct me if i'm wrong!!
3. Most abboying of all - temps. I know theres no way of accuratley telling them, but on goddam speedfan exotics, CPU= 34, CPU=44 (with a tick), core0=58, core1=58, core2=51, core3=54. On Uguru (from my MOBO) it says cpu is 44, so I guess all this BS about different core temps is merely innaccurate?

Many thanks for the help guys and sorry if this is a wasting your time
Q6660, Abit IP35 Pro, Dominator XMS2 PC2-8500C5, 650tx, Arctic freezer pro 7
 

jeanluclariviere

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For temps use realtemp (as discussed in the temperature stricky at the top of this forum) and check your bios is vcore is being silly.

As for RAM ratio & speed:

Your FSB to RAM Ratio is set at 2:3. Here is how I figure it out, and there is a much easier way to do it im sure, but anyway.

For every 2mhz of FSB you use, you are using 3mhz of RAM.

I calculat this like so...
356mhz / 2mhz = 178mhz
356mhz + 178mhz = 534mhz

So, CPU-Z is actually reading the right memory speed, according to the RAM ratio you've selected. In reallity, you never needed 1066mhz rated memory. Try increasing the ratio to atleast 1:2 or increase your FSB to around 400 and set it to a 1:1.

Anyone else care to comment ?
 

theAnimal

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Since the RAM is DDR2 the effective speed is actually 534 x 2, which is 1068.
 

fruees

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@ The Animal

ok.... but seeing as my RAM is only rated at 1066, does that mean I'm already exceeding my RAM speed? I know DDR2 gives you more performance, but I didn't know that the RAM frequency is multiplied by two.

1. So I assume I can't go higher on my RAM than I am now, given that it has reached 1066mhz. The only thing to change would be the ratio right?
2. so increasing the ratio to 1:2 would be bad because it woulld make my RAM 712 X 2 (because its DDR2) = 1424mhz which is way over what it is rated at? I'm sorry I didn't know that for DDr2 you multiply the frequency by 2
 

Peaks

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you multiply the frequency by two because DDR2 is "double pumped", with DDR3 being "tripled pumped".

If you look in the SPD tab on CPUz it will show you the various JEDEC and EPP RAM speeds, timings and voltages for your RAM. It might be possible that your RAM can run faster than 1066MHz but that depend on whether it is actual 1066MHz RAM or 800MHz overclocked. A lot of 1066MHz RAM is actually just 800Mhz RAM overclocked, 800 being the JEDEC rating and 1066 being the performance enhanced EPP rating.

+1 on your RAM running at 1068!!
 

theAnimal

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Technically you are OCing the RAM, by a whopping 2MHz. You should be able to run it faster than that, but may need to increase the voltage to do so.
 

Peaks

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yea should be able to run that RAM at 1100 with a possible vDIMM increase. Wont notice mush difference tho so not really any point.
 

4745454b

Titan
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you multiply the frequency by two because DDR2 is "double pumped", with DDR3 being "tripled pumped".

This isn't correct AFAIK. Its still DOUBLE Data Rate 3 ram. Third version, not multiply by three.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DDR3_SDRAM

In electronic engineering, DDR3 SDRAM or double-data-rate three synchronous dynamic random access memory... DDR3 modules can transfer data at a rate of 800–1600 MHz using both rising and falling edges of a 400–800 MHz I/O clock.

The ability to transfer at the raising and falling edges of the clock is why we multiply by two. An easier way to work with a multiplier is to simply do the math. 2:3 = multiply by three, and then divide by 2. 356 * 3 = 1068. (seeing as its DDR, you can leave it at this as this is the effective speed.) 1068 / 2 = 534, your actual ram speed.

You can push your CPU farther by dropping the divider down to 1:1. To find your ram speed just double the actual FSB speed. (356 in your case.) This will allow you to run your CPU faster, while not overclocking your ram.

 

theAnimal

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DDR3 is FSB x 4. So a 333FSB = DDR2 667 or DDR3 1333.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_kttUtY0Z_zw/SDYPmzb0gqI/AAAAAAAAAWE/HQ-wU8h86rg/s1600-h/memory-fsb-chart.png
 

4745454b

Titan
Moderator
I don't follow your chart at all. The lines for DDR2 and DDR3 at 800 and 1066 are identical, except for the first column. This I assume is the internal clock speed for the ram, similar to the internal clock speed of a CPU. Wiki claims,

The primary benefit of DDR3 is the ability to transfer twice the data rate of DDR2 (I/O at 8X the data rate of the memory cells it contains), thus enabling higher bus rates and higher peak rates than earlier memory technologies.

There WAS a line in that wiki about DDR3 being 8x, DDR2 being 4x, and DDR being 2x, but it seems to have disappeared. Again, your own chart shows the memory bus and transfers/s for DDR2 and DDR3 at 800 and 1066 to be the same, why would the math all of a sudden be different?
 

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