Question CPU always running on max frequency while charger plugged in

Oct 5, 2020
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Problem: CPU is always running on max frequency while charger is plugged in. If i dont disable turbo boost through Throttlestop, it stays constantly arounf 3.8Ghz and temperatures are 90C+, which is not good even when I am not doing anything. So I disable turbo boost to not let it exceed 2.2Ghz(Base frequency), which is still not good enough I think. I don't understand why it always tries to have the max frequency possible.

HP Omen dc-0051nr
Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-8750H CPU @ 2.20GHz
I live in tropical region so temp is a lot higher than normal anyways.
When charger is removed, frequency keeps changing normally.

Power options
I tried playing with these. Changed max processor state to 99% while charging and also used a registry adder to bring the Performance boost mode settings. Really thought disabling that would make difference but it didn't.


When Turbo isn't disabled in Throttlestop
Frequency almost always stays constant around 3.8Ghz. Laptop becomes unworkable as temp is always over 90C. So I have to disable turbo.


When Turbo is disabled in Throttlestop
Even after disabling turbo, CPU constantly remains around 2.1 Ghz. Normal working temp around 55-60C.


Underclock settings
I tried under-clocking CPU when I bought it 2 years ago.


Bios settings
 
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Oct 5, 2020
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And 2.2MHz is bad?
It runs constantly on that, even when I am not doing anything. So my temperature is around 60C. I don't think it should be that way. Also this is when I have disabled the turbo boost, otherwise temp would reach 90C, so ofc there is some problem.
 
Oct 5, 2020
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It should be able to boost - https://en.wikichip.org/wiki/intel/core_i7/i7-8750h#:~:text=The i7-8750H operates at,-channel DDR4-2666 memory.

Remove the covers and blow the dust out.
Also re paste the cpu cooler.
Maybe that'll help you bring the temps down enough so you can boost.
Hey, sorry if you misunderstood. My problem is that the processor always tries to run at the max frequency possible. I know I have lot of dust inside, and it would definitely cool down comparatively after cleaning. But this problem has been since the start, when laptop was new and clean.
It just shoots up to the max frequency possible as soon as I connect charger. I have currently limited it by disabling turbo boost, it still shoots up to 2.2Ghz(max possible). It doesn't care if I am just browsing or gaming etc. I was hoping someone could see the pictures of my settings and figure out why this is happening.
Thanks for your reply.
 
Oct 5, 2020
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2.2GHz is it's base frequency. It can boost to 4.0GHz if it runs cool enough.
So it's idling when it's at 2.2GHz.
Yeah but it is constantly stays at 3.8Ghz, which is a problem as temp shoots to 90C, even if I am just browsing. So the problem is constant turbo boost(while charging), leading to high temperatures. Why isn't it fluctuating according to load.
Is anything wrong with the settings pictures I shared?
 
May 22, 2020
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Why isn't it fluctuating according to load.
Intel does not engineer their CPUs to fluctuate their speed based on load. Here is a paper that explains this.

https://www2.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2009/EECS-2009-140.pdf

If a task needs to be performed, the CPU needs to get up to full speed as fast as possible so it can complete the task as fast as possible. This allows the CPU cores to spend more time in the low power C7 state. That is how modern CPUs save power. Limping along at a slow speed is not the solution.

Here is a picture of the same CPU running at a slow speed vs running at full speed. Any difference in power consumption or difference in the CPU temperature? Nope. No difference.



When your computer is idle without any web browsers open or anything else running, what does ThrottleStop report for C0%? That seems to be your biggest problem. Too much crap running in the background.

When tasks need to be performed, Intel CPUs are engineered to complete tasks at full speed. Lots of poorly designed laptops with 6 core CPUs run at or very close to the thermal throttling temperature. You can try replacing the thermal paste but that is not going to fix a heatsink that is under designed.

If you do not want to fix the cooling issue, open the TPL window and lower the long and short term turbo power limits to what your cooler can handle. Instead of the rated 45W, go for 40W or 35W. You will lose performance but your CPU will run a little cooler.
 
Oct 5, 2020
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Intel does not engineer their CPUs to fluctuate their speed based on load. Here is a paper that explains this.

https://www2.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2009/EECS-2009-140.pdf

If a task needs to be performed, the CPU needs to get up to full speed as fast as possible so it can complete the task as fast as possible. This allows the CPU cores to spend more time in the low power C7 state. That is how modern CPUs save power. Limping along at a slow speed is not the solution.

Here is a picture of the same CPU running at a slow speed vs running at full speed. Any difference in power consumption or difference in the CPU temperature? Nope. No difference.



When your computer is idle without any web browsers open or anything else running, what does ThrottleStop report for C0%? That seems to be your biggest problem. Too much crap running in the background.

When tasks need to be performed, Intel CPUs are engineered to complete tasks at full speed. Lots of poorly designed laptops with 6 core CPUs run at or very close to the thermal throttling temperature. You can try replacing the thermal paste but that is not going to fix a heatsink that is under designed.

If you do not want to fix the cooling issue, open the TPL window and lower the long and short term turbo power limits to what your cooler can handle. Instead of the rated 45W, go for 40W or 35W. You will lose performance but your CPU will run a little cooler.
Yeah, my C0% are constantly high. How do I solve that?
Thanks.
 
May 22, 2020
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How do I solve that?
Open the Task Manager, click on the Details tab and click on the CPU heading to organize the tasks running on your computer by CPU usage. High C0% when your computer is supposed to be idle means that something is running in the background. This will reduce performance and can cause a lot of unnecessary heat.

They aren't. They are all less than 2%
Have a look at the pictures in the first post in this thread. His C0% is way beyond 2%.
 
Reactions: gamerboy09pc
May 22, 2020
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You'd have to use your CPU less
All he has to do is find out what is running on his computer. Something is running in the background that is keeping his CPU active which is creating heat. Every time a new app or game is installed, people need to pay attention to what that app is doing to their computer when it is not running. It should not be running at all. Any useful program can install a load of crap on the side if you are not paying attention. Windows 10 is very efficient when setup properly.

 

SteveRX4

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All he has to do is find out what is running on his computer. Something is running in the background that is keeping his CPU active which is creating heat. Every time a new app or game is installed, people need to pay attention to what that app is doing to their computer when it is not running. It should not be running at all. Any useful program can install a load of crap on the side if you are not paying attention. Windows 10 is very efficient when setup properly.

Yes - he needs to look at Task manager and work out what he doesn't need. Same with Windows Startup.
But he's not doing it.
 

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