Question Cpu keeps overheating

Jun 22, 2019
17
3
15
0
I’ve been having problems with my cpu
I have a ryzen 5 2600 with a gtx 2060 on 550w and my cpu keeps overheating I replaced the stock cooler with an arctic freezer 34 esports edition but my temps are still dangerously high does anyone know what the issue is
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
How many case fans do you have and what is the orientation of EACH case fan, intake or exhaust, for each location?

Is your CPU cooler mounted with a vertical or horizontal orientation?

Is the backplate secured and the CPU cooler fully secured to the backplate, with no slop or movement of the heatsink if you gently try to move or twist it?

What paste application method did you use?

Do you have the latest motherboard BIOS version installed?

What is your core voltage set to and how many memory modules are installed?

What are you USING to monitor temperatures and what are you running to test the thermals, or is it overheating under normal non-stress test conditions?
 

DMAN999

Commendable
Apr 17, 2019
1,453
368
1,390
52
Also what is the temperature in the room where the PC is ?
My Ryzen 5 2600 is OC'd to 4 GHz (@ 1.32V) and idles around 29-30C and maxes out around 55-56C after gaming for 3-4 hours.
My ambient temperature stays around 70F (21C).
I have an Arctic 33 eSports Edition cooler (dual fan) which is very similar to yours, I believe the only difference is that yours has better fans.

I do have Very good airflow in my case too though.
I have 2 120 mm front intake fans, a 120 mm side panel intake fan, a 120 rear exhaust fan and a 140 mm top exhaust fan.
I keep my intake fans running about 1600 rpm and my exhaust fans around 1200 rpm, so I have positive pressure.

PS
I used Arctic Silver 5 Thermal Paste (not the MX-4 paste that came with the cooler) but I did apply a thin line to each pipe as recommended by Arctic. If I didn't already have the Arctic Silver 5 laying around I would have used the MX-4 and I'm sure it would have been just fine too.
 
Last edited:

BiggWigg92

Commendable
Jun 23, 2017
25
5
1,535
0
As per Darkbreeze, having proper air flow into and out of your computer case is vital. Otherwise you air simply heating the air inside and circulating it around your components. With regard to this, you generally want air to flow from the front to the back, from the bottom to the top, or an angle mixing both. This way fresh air enters the front from the cool of your room as well as from the bottom to the top which is ideal as that's the natural way heat flows; heat naturally rises. You want the air flow in and out, know as push and pull, to be either equal or slightly sliding towards more in with a little venting allows to aid in dust management while keeping overall airflow maximized.

As for your thermal paste, the ideal application is one where you have just enough to ensure 100% contact between your CPU and your cooler. Naturally the surface has imperfections and the purpose of thermal paste is to fill the small dips and gaps between them with a highly thermally conductive material while not adding any unnecessary material. There are a few ways to apply it that work and a YouTube search can yield numerous results explaining and demonstrating each so that you can decide which is easiest for you. Remember, you want enough to ensure 100% contact and not a bit more.

As far as tuning your settings such as voltage, keep in mind a slightly higher voltage will increase stability in overclocking but will significantly increase heat. Try to find a sweet spot while tuning.
 
Jun 22, 2019
17
3
15
0
How many case fans do you have and what is the orientation of EACH case fan, intake or exhaust, for each location?

Is your CPU cooler mounted with a vertical or horizontal orientation?

Is the backplate secured and the CPU cooler fully secured to the backplate, with no slop or movement of the heatsink if you gently try to move or twist it?

What paste application method did you use?

Do you have the latest motherboard BIOS version installed?

What is your core voltage set to and how many memory modules are installed?

What are you USING to monitor temperatures and what are you running to test the thermals, or is it overheating under normal non-stress test conditions?
Like this.

The photo accurately displays my setup I use and software as well as on screen displays to monitor my cpu my room is around 65 Fahrenheit I use thermal paste and the cooler is secure, but I had issues with my old stock cooler as well. As far as I know my bios is up to date and my voltage is at stock 1.2V
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
If you get to 50C idle, then there is something wrong with contact between the HSF and CPU. My i5-3470 under 20-25% load only gets to 42C using a fan-less 212+ and a room temperature of about 30C. My case has only three populated fan slots: rear exhaust and two filtered front intakes, all set to their lowest speed.
 
Reactions: DMAN999

DMAN999

Commendable
Apr 17, 2019
1,453
368
1,390
52
It sounds like you need to remove the cooler wipe the paste off the cooler and CPU and then re-install it because something is Very wrong.
I just played Rage 2 for about an hour and my CPU maxed out at 47C.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I’m using amd cpu monitoring and mai afterburner osd to monitor I don’t over clock my cpu at all and I’m at 1.2v
This literally tells us nothing. WHAT software are you using to monitor the thermals? HWinfo? Core Temp? Ryzen Master? Yes, it makes a big difference because some of the monitoring software out there just plain sucks and isn't accurate with some platforms and chipsets or specific sensors. Others may misread or misreport one sensor as being another.

If you are not using HWinfo, Core Temp or Ryzen master, then I would recommend unistalling whatever it is you are using and installing one of those two programs. Your monitoring software might be accurate, but lets be sure by using a utility that we know tends to be more accurate, more often, than other utilities.

I also agree that the problem is almost certainly due to the CPU heatsink not being mounted correctly, or some other issue related to that such as not using thermal paste, not fully tightening the heatsink down. Using the WRONG backplate or mounting hardware (Usually, hardware for several different sockets comes in the kit and it is VERY common for people to use the wrong standoffs from the kit for their specific socket which causes too much space between the heatsink and CPU heat spreader even when fully tightened down to the standoffs.)

If your temps are accurate, then something you've done during the installation of the heatsink is wrong, or the fan is pointing the wrong direction, or there is a problem with the cooling configuration in general.

Monitoring software

HWmonitor, Open hardware monitor, Realtemp, Speccy, Speedfan, Windows utilities, CPU-Z, NZXT CAM and most of the bundled motherboard utilities are often not the best choice as they are not always accurate. Some are actually grossly inaccurate, especially with certain chipsets or specific sensors that for whatever reason they tend to not like or work well with. I've found HWinfo or CoreTemp to be the MOST accurate with the broadest range of chipsets and sensors. They are also almost religiously kept up to date.

CoreTemp is great for just CPU thermals including core temps or distance to TJmax on older AMD platforms.

HWinfo is great for pretty much EVERYTHING, including CPU thermals, core loads, core temps, package temps, GPU sensors, HDD and SSD sensors, motherboard chipset and VRM sensor, all of it. When starting HWinfo after installation, always check the box next to "sensors only" and de-select the box next to "summary".


Run HWinfo and look at system voltages and other sensor readings.

Monitoring temperatures, core speeds, voltages, clock ratios and other reported sensor data can often help to pick out an issue right off the bat. HWinfo is a good way to get that data and in my experience tends to be more accurate than some of the other utilities available. CPU-Z, GPU-Z and Core Temp all have their uses but HWinfo tends to have it all laid out in a more convenient fashion so you can usually see what one sensor is reporting while looking at another instead of having to flip through various tabs that have specific groupings, plus, it is extremely rare for HWinfo to not report the correct sensor values under the correct sensor listings, or misreport other information. Utilities like HWmonitor, Openhardware monitor and Speccy, tend to COMMONLY misreport sensor data, or not report it at all.

After installation, run the utility and when asked, choose "sensors only". The other window options have some use but in most cases everything you need will be located in the sensors window. If you're taking screenshots to post for troubleshooting, it will most likely require taking three screenshots and scrolling down the sensors window between screenshots in order to capture them all.

It is most helpful if you can take a series of HWinfo screenshots at idle, after a cold boot to the desktop. Open HWinfo and wait for all of the Windows startup processes to complete. Usually about four or five minutes should be plenty. Take screenshots of all the HWinfo sensors.

Next, run something demanding like Prime95 version 26.6 or Heaven benchmark. Take another set of screenshots while either of those is running so we can see what the hardware is doing while under a load.


*Download HWinfo



For temperature monitoring only, I feel Core Temp is the most accurate and also offers a quick visual reference for core speed, load and CPU voltage:


*Download Core Temp



Posting screenshots, when requested, is helpful so WE can see what is going on as well and you can learn how to do that here:


Detailed instructions on posting images on Tom's hardware forums
 
Last edited:
Jun 22, 2019
17
3
15
0
I’m using ryzen master I couldn’t figure out the name, but I saw something wrong with the heat sink I uninstalled it and the backplate is loose after installing the mobo standoffs that come with the cooler. How do I fix that?
 
Jun 22, 2019
17
3
15
0
The only bracket that come with the cooler is for intel 1151, i looked in my case and the cooler is on top of the cpu but the mobo bracket seems to be pulling against the mobo. This is not due to tightend screws, but due to the weight of the cooler pulling against it
 

DMAN999

Commendable
Apr 17, 2019
1,453
368
1,390
52
I also used the backplate that came with my motherboard and installation was very simple.
Mine doesn't use standoffs like yours does, it uses screws that I had to screw directly into the backplate with a screw driver.

Are you 100% sure you used the correct standoffs, the Arctic pages shows multiple standoffs supplied for different applications.
Also some standoff appear to have different length threads so I would ensure they are installed in the proper orientation for an AM4 install.
That cooler should NOT be loose at all, it should be snug on the CPU and MB.
I can lift my MB up by the cooler and it will not move at all.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
If that cooler was manufactured before the release of AM4, and it might have been a pre-AM4 production model even though they are still manufacturing it and including the correct hardware for it now, then it may not have the proper hardware. If it's labeled AM4 though, then it should be right. It is however possible that not all of the correct hardware made it into the box OR that somebody returned it without putting it all back in and they shipped it to you without checking.

I'd get the correct mounting hardware from Arctic. Tell them you bought it and it didn't come with it.

Another option, or possibility, is that some motherboards are significantly thinner that others, and even with the correct hardware there may be slop. It is sometimes necessary to get some additional fiber or plastic washers and take up the slack by putting them between the backplate and the motherboard, so that the fasteners pass through them, in order to move the fastener further away from the standoff so that it cannot bottom out before it gets tight.

Similar to what you see here, although you probably don't need washers quite THAT thick. Figure out how much slop there is and go just barely thicker than that, just enough so that the screws or standoffs can't bottom out before the assembly can fully snug down.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dEBzLQ6qYnc
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY