Question CPU overheating H100 v2

christonian

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I was having high temperature issues while steaming and gaming

I decided to try redo my thermal paste as machine is over 5yrs old now

  1. I tried a thermal pad but it said it was hitting 100c with 20% load so I knew something was wrong
  2. Went back to thermal paste and still get 100c with 20% load
No system lockup but don’t want to run long at that temperature


Any ideas need help main computer for work and gaming
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
If your cooler is more than two years old, then it's likely you have a faulty pump and should just replace the unit. All these Corsair coolers from more than a year ago seem to commonly have pump failures at around 2-3 years in. That holds true for a lot of AIO coolers. I'd be very surprised if it was anything other than loss of coolant in the loop or faulty pump. Neither of which you can do anything about other than replacing it.

Assuming of course that all fans are working normally and that it was working normally at some point prior to when it wasn't, and that you didn't change anything in the configuration between then and now.
 

DSzymborski

Champion
Moderator
It's likely that the pump is not working properly. 99.99% of the time, a cooling problem this significant with an AIO is:

  • Broken AIO
  • Incorrect installation
You could use mustard and get better cooling than this; it's not a problem of thermal paste or thermal pads.

The act of removing heat from one place to another is basic physics, so as long as the equipment is working and it's installed correctly, it will work. One of the few rare exceptions if you have some weird overclock that you set accidentally, but it's quite hard to do that.
 

christonian

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If your cooler is more than two years old, then it's likely you have a faulty pump and should just replace the unit. All these Corsair coolers from more than a year ago seem to commonly have pump failures at around 2-3 years in. That holds true for a lot of AIO coolers. I'd be very surprised if it was anything other than loss of coolant in the loop or faulty pump. Neither of which you can do anything about other than replacing it.

Assuming of course that all fans are working normally and that it was working normally at some point prior to when it wasn't, and that you didn't change anything in the configuration between then and now.
would you recommend going air or just get another liquid cooling

only thing upsetting me is that it worked before what is the issue now it should get better not worse
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Everything that's broken worked before it broke.
Exactly. Everything. Well, most everything. There are a few things that were broke from the start, like three toed socks, but mainly, if it works it will break at some point and then it will have been working before it was broken.

Before your car broke down, it was working.

Before you got sick, you were fine.

Before ....., well you get the idea.

Personally, whether to go with air or water greatly depends on your hardware, which we know nothing about because you haven't told us, and your case and case fan configuration, and what you plan to do WITH the system, and what you have to spend, and how far you are willing to go in terms of personal time investment.

If you have a 9900k for example, a big custom loop is probably a great idea but for most CPU models there is an air cooler that will work fine, last a lot longer, never leak or have a pump failure and cost less than even the most basic 240mm AIO coolers.

For some, the aesthetic of an AIO is the bigger concern, but if performance is the biggest concern then we need to know all this stuff.
 

christonian

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It's likely that the pump is not working properly. 99.99% of the time, a cooling problem this significant with an AIO is:

  • Broken AIO
  • Incorrect installation
You could use mustard and get better cooling than this; it's not a problem of thermal paste or thermal pads.

The act of removing heat from one place to another is basic physics, so as long as the equipment is working and it's installed correctly, it will work. One of the few rare exceptions if you have some weird overclock that you set accidentally, but it's quite hard to do that.
After initial startup it does come down from 100c but whenever I do anything it jacks right back up to 100c just minor stuff

so looks like cooling is still working but not really also lol

no overclocking ever it is a good enough processor to not need it
 

DSzymborski

Champion
Moderator
After initial startup it does come down from 100c but whenever I do anything it jacks right back up to 100c just minor stuff

so looks like cooling is still working but not really also lol

no overclocking ever it is a good enough processor to not need it
Most likely it's throttling.

You need to be replacing the cooling, not running the PC at this point.
 

christonian

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Exactly. Everything. Well, most everything. There are a few things that were broke from the start, like three toed socks, but mainly, if it works it will break at some point and then it will have been working before it was broken.

Before your car broke down, it was working.

Before you got sick, you were fine.

Before ....., well you get the idea.

Personally, whether to go with air or water greatly depends on your hardware, which we know nothing about because you haven't told us, and your case and case fan configuration, and what you plan to do WITH the system, and what you have to spend, and how far you are willing to go in terms of personal time investment.

If you have a 9900k for example, a big custom loop is probably a great idea but for most CPU models there is an air cooler that will work fine, last a lot longer, never leak or have a pump failure and cost less than even the most basic 240mm AIO coolers.

For some, the aesthetic of an AIO is the bigger concern, but if performance is the biggest concern then we need to know all this stuff.
gaming and streaming is my heavy duty for the machine

work is just browser and word lol

specs
4790k with h100 v2
Z97 killer
16gb
Gtx 1080ti
Next 400 I think red
 
Jan 7, 2020
17
1
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0
If your cooler is more than two years old, then it's likely you have a faulty pump and should just replace the unit. All these Corsair coolers from more than a year ago seem to commonly have pump failures at around 2-3 years in. That holds true for a lot of AIO coolers. I'd be very surprised if it was anything other than loss of coolant in the loop or faulty pump. Neither of which you can do anything about other than replacing it.

Assuming of course that all fans are working normally and that it was working normally at some point prior to when it wasn't, and that you didn't change anything in the configuration between then and now.
how much was your pc?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
The NH-U14S will easily handle your 4790k, as it handles my 6700k@4.6Ghz, just fine.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-U14S 82.52 CFM CPU Cooler ($63.75 @ Amazon)
Total: $63.75
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-01-25 22:38 EST-0500



This is an excellent choice, plenty of cooling capability for that 4790k, even if you're heavily overclocking.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU Cooler: Thermalright Macho X2 Limited Edition CPU Cooler ($55.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $55.99
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-01-25 22:35 EST-0500



Or if you want to go a step beyond that, this is almost as good as it gets on air. Almost.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D15 CHROMAX.BLACK 82.52 CFM CPU Cooler ($99.95 @ Amazon)
Total: $99.95
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-01-25 22:37 EST-0500



These will all fit your case, no problem.

You will likely want to repurpose your radiator fans as intake fans on your case, assuming you had a front mounted radiator. In any case, using air cooling, you would be best served to ensure you have two front intake fans and a rear and top-rear exhaust fan, so that there is plenty of rapid exchange through the case to supply the CPU cooler with fresh ambient air.

If you prefer to stick with an AIO cooler, then I'd be inclined to suggest you stick with another Corsair, but seems like a waste of money to me to have to replace them every couple of years. At least with an air cooler, worst case you MIGHT have to replace a fan every six or seven years.
 
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christonian

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I ended up ordering the NH-D15 before I saw this post was a pain to install but once in my computer was up and running thank god it wasnt something else wrong lol

Do you let it run at 100% or do you have a fan program and on a fan curve

I used to use iCue from Corsair but I cant control anything from that
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
You need to set up the fan curve in the bios. Usually, for most modern motherboards, including for the Z97 chipset, there should be the ability to choose a preset fan profile such as Standard, Silent, Performance, etc., in the BIOS, and also usually, at least on higher end boards back then (And just about everything now), to set a manual or custom fan curve as well.

Truthfully, the Standard or Normal preset is probably where I'd start, just to get a baseline, and then if it's plenty, which it likely is, you might drop it to the Silent preset. If it's not good enough, try the Performance preset.
 

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