CPU Temp: 13C

Jack

Distinguished
Jun 26, 2003
1,276
0
19,280
0
Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.msi-microstar,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

I have just updated the drivers for my MSI K8T Neo mobo, updated my BIOS and
updated the MSI "CoreCenter" monitoring software.

CoreCenter and the BIOS both give me temperature readings for my CPU. Before
the updates the BIOS and CoreCenter reported my CPU as having temperatures
of between 39C and 51C depending on the room temp and what I was doing. This
seemed a fairly normal temperature and I was satisfied with it.

However since the updates my CPU temperature has went way down according to
this software. When I go into the BIOS it's reporting the temp as 19C. When
I'm sitting idle in Windows XP - as I am now - it's sitting at 13C! I tested
it by encoding a large MP3 and it went up to 27C after 5 mins of encoding.

I have CoolNQuiet (http://www.amdboard.com/coolnquiet.html) switched on and
an Athlon-64 3400 Clawhammer (2.2GHz) with a Arctic Cooling Silencer 64 fan.
Can this be real? I'm concerned that the temps are being misreported...
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.msi-microstar,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

Jack wrote:
> I have just updated the drivers for my MSI K8T Neo mobo, updated my BIOS and
> updated the MSI "CoreCenter" monitoring software.
>
> CoreCenter and the BIOS both give me temperature readings for my CPU. Before
> the updates the BIOS and CoreCenter reported my CPU as having temperatures
> of between 39C and 51C depending on the room temp and what I was doing. This
> seemed a fairly normal temperature and I was satisfied with it.
>
> However since the updates my CPU temperature has went way down according to
> this software. When I go into the BIOS it's reporting the temp as 19C. When
> I'm sitting idle in Windows XP - as I am now - it's sitting at 13C! I tested
> it by encoding a large MP3 and it went up to 27C after 5 mins of encoding.
>
> I have CoolNQuiet (http://www.amdboard.com/coolnquiet.html) switched on and
> an Athlon-64 3400 Clawhammer (2.2GHz) with a Arctic Cooling Silencer 64 fan.
> Can this be real? I'm concerned that the temps are being misreported...
>
>

Have you checked the release notes for the BIOS and CoreCenter updates
that you installed? It could be that the old versions were misreporting
the temps.

Parish
 

Jack

Distinguished
Jun 26, 2003
1,276
0
19,280
0
Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.msi-microstar,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"Parish" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
news:363uqiF4pv6flU1@individual.net...
>
> Have you checked the release notes for the BIOS and CoreCenter updates
> that you installed? It could be that the old versions were misreporting
> the temps.

I just did and one of the fixes was a misreported CPU temperature. :)
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.msi-microstar,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

Jack wrote:
> "Parish" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
> news:363uqiF4pv6flU1@individual.net...
>>
>> Have you checked the release notes for the BIOS and CoreCenter updates
>> that you installed? It could be that the old versions were misreporting
>> the temps.
>
> I just did and one of the fixes was a misreported CPU temperature. :)
>
>

Well AMD must have done some good design work with the 64 then if it
only hots 27C after 5 mins of MP3 encoding. Athlon XPs were very hot
chips - my dual MP2800s idle at 45-50 depending on room temp, although
they don't get much hotter when worked hard, thankfully :)

Parish
 

Jack

Distinguished
Jun 26, 2003
1,276
0
19,280
0
Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.msi-microstar,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"Parish" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
news:363vnmF4qh5v8U1@individual.net...
> Jack wrote:
>> "Parish" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
>> news:363uqiF4pv6flU1@individual.net...
>>>
>>> Have you checked the release notes for the BIOS and CoreCenter updates
>>> that you installed? It could be that the old versions were misreporting
>>> the temps.
>>
>> I just did and one of the fixes was a misreported CPU temperature. :)
>
> Well AMD must have done some good design work with the 64 then if it only
> hots 27C after 5 mins of MP3 encoding. Athlon XPs were very hot chips - my
> dual MP2800s idle at 45-50 depending on room temp, although they don't get
> much hotter when worked hard, thankfully :)

Hence the reason for my concern. I previously had an Athlon XP 2000 and it
ran anywhere between 40C and 60C - therefore my new chip running at 13C is
worryingly low for me... I find it hard to believe it's correct. :)
 

steveh

Distinguished
Apr 14, 2004
146
0
18,680
0
Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.msi-microstar,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"Jack" <jack@hello.com> wrote in message
news:363va7F4qe5urU1@individual.net...
> "Parish" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
> news:363uqiF4pv6flU1@individual.net...
>>
>> Have you checked the release notes for the BIOS and CoreCenter updates
>> that you installed? It could be that the old versions were misreporting
>> the temps.
>
> I just did and one of the fixes was a misreported CPU temperature. :)
Of all the PC's I've built, the only ones to consistently misreport temps
are the ones based on MSI boards!

SteveH
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.msi-microstar,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

Jack wrote:

> "Parish" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
> news:363vnmF4qh5v8U1@individual.net...
> > Jack wrote:
> >> "Parish" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
> >> news:363uqiF4pv6flU1@individual.net...
> > > >
> >>> Have you checked the release notes for the BIOS and CoreCenter
> updates >>> that you installed? It could be that the old versions
> were misreporting >>> the temps.
> > >
> >> I just did and one of the fixes was a misreported CPU temperature.
> :)
> >
> > Well AMD must have done some good design work with the 64 then if
> > it only hots 27C after 5 mins of MP3 encoding. Athlon XPs were very
> > hot chips - my dual MP2800s idle at 45-50 depending on room temp,
> > although they don't get much hotter when worked hard, thankfully :)
>
> Hence the reason for my concern. I previously had an Athlon XP 2000
> and it ran anywhere between 40C and 60C - therefore my new chip
> running at 13C is worryingly low for me... I find it hard to believe
> it's correct. :)

You're not the only one! I've got a 64 3500 on an Abit AV8 which idles
at 36C with Cool'n'Quiet clocking the multiplier at 5. Under load it
goes up to 68C. That's with a fairly mild overclock of 216FSB & all
voltages at their standard settings. Abit & MSI must read the temps in
very different ways...

One thing that threw me when I first started using Cool'n'Quiet was how
some apps didn't make the temps go up despite causing 100% CPU usage.
Then I discovered that the multiplier stays at 5 if the app uses a task
priority of 'Low'.

--
Preston.

http://www.muddystuff.co.uk
Off-road classifieds
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.msi-microstar,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

> Hence the reason for my concern. I previously had an Athlon XP 2000 and it
> ran anywhere between 40C and 60C - therefore my new chip running at 13C is
> worryingly low for me... I find it hard to believe it's correct. :)

What's your ambient temperature? If it's above 13°C (very likely) and you are
not using Peltier or phase change cooling then a false temperature reading is
the only possibility left I would say.

David
 

Jack

Distinguished
Jun 26, 2003
1,276
0
19,280
0
Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.msi-microstar,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"David Johnstone" <david_ffm@mail.com> wrote in message
news:ctijfk$mq1$00$1@news.t-online.com...
>
>> Hence the reason for my concern. I previously had an Athlon XP 2000 and
>> it
>> ran anywhere between 40C and 60C - therefore my new chip running at 13C
>> is
>> worryingly low for me... I find it hard to believe it's correct. :)
>
> What's your ambient temperature?

Above 13C. ;)

> If it's above 13°C (very likely) and you are
> not using Peltier or phase change cooling then a false temperature reading
> is
> the only possibility left I would say.

Yeah. I'll look out for another BIOS update then...
 

Borg

Distinguished
Mar 9, 2001
136
0
18,680
0
Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.msi-microstar,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

On 30 Jan 2005 11:14:01 GMT, "Jack" <jack@hello.com> wrote:

>I have CoolNQuiet (http://www.amdboard.com/coolnquiet.html)

Anything like this for a none 64 Bit Xp chip, I'd love to get mine
down a bit in the shuttle ?

--
arjftebhcf@jryfutbi.pb.hx<--ROT13 it
Spam Trap in Header

Child Birth is hereditary,
If your parents didn't have any children
Then the chances are you wont.


http://borg.no-ip.com
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.msi-microstar,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

Jack wrote:
> "Parish" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
>> Jack wrote:
>>> "Parish" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
>>>>
>>>> Have you checked the release notes for the BIOS and CoreCenter
>>>> updates that you installed? It could be that the old versions
>>>> were misreporting the temps.
>>>
>>> I just did and one of the fixes was a misreported CPU
>>> temperature. :)
>>
>> Well AMD must have done some good design work with the 64 then if
>> it only hots 27C after 5 mins of MP3 encoding. Athlon XPs were
>> very hot chips - my dual MP2800s idle at 45-50 depending on room
>> temp, although they don't get much hotter when worked hard,
>> thankfully :)
>
> Hence the reason for my concern. I previously had an Athlon XP 2000
> and it ran anywhere between 40C and 60C - therefore my new chip
> running at 13C is worryingly low for me... I find it hard to
> believe it's correct. :)

Considering that room temperature is about 20 C, and that very few
CPUs function as refrigerators, the possibility of your system
being correct becomes vanishingly small.

--
"If you want to post a followup via groups.google.com, don't use
the broken "Reply" link at the bottom of the article. Click on
"show options" at the top of the article, then click on the
"Reply" at the bottom of the article headers." - Keith Thompson
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.msi-microstar,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

>
> Considering that room temperature is about 20 C, and that very few
> CPUs function as refrigerators, the possibility of your system
> being correct becomes vanishingly small.
>
He could be an Inuit. Brings a whole new meaning to Artic Silver!
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.msi-microstar,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

On 30 Jan 2005 11:56:49 GMT, "Jack" <jack@hello.com> wrote:

| "Parish" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
| news:363vnmF4qh5v8U1@individual.net...
| > Jack wrote:
| >> "Parish" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
| >> news:363uqiF4pv6flU1@individual.net...
| >>>
| >>> Have you checked the release notes for the BIOS and CoreCenter updates
| >>> that you installed? It could be that the old versions were misreporting
| >>> the temps.
| >>
| >> I just did and one of the fixes was a misreported CPU temperature. :)
| >
| > Well AMD must have done some good design work with the 64 then if it only
| > hots 27C after 5 mins of MP3 encoding. Athlon XPs were very hot chips - my
| > dual MP2800s idle at 45-50 depending on room temp, although they don't get
| > much hotter when worked hard, thankfully :)
|
| Hence the reason for my concern. I previously had an Athlon XP 2000 and it
| ran anywhere between 40C and 60C - therefore my new chip running at 13C is
| worryingly low for me... I find it hard to believe it's correct. :)

It's not correct unless your system is in a very cold room! 13C
(55.4F) probably wouldn't even occur in an operating computer in an
igloo!

Larc



§§§ - Change planet to earth to reply by email - §§§
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.msi-microstar,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

Hi Jack, why dont you check the temperatures with a Digital thermometer
also some Digital Multi Meters have a thermometer function too.

Yes 13%C does seem a bit too low for my liking too, likewise i have a ASUS
A7V600-X with and overheating Via KT600 chipset, the bios and Everest
reports about 30%C, rarly changes (sometimes it jumps 20-30%C in a single
step), but my DMM reports between 28 from cold rising 1%C every 3 seconds
to 55%C just sitting idle, under load it rises to 65%C, the DMM sensor is
placed in bottom of HS on the top side opposite the core.

Cpu: XP3200+ 26 - 35 idle, 36 - 55%C under load
chipset: 28 - 55 idle, 56 - 65%C, (highest recorded so far)
HDD: 18 - 25%C
Room: 18 - 22%C
--
Andrew Mcintosh
ASI Industries = Alpha Soft International Industries. (1990 - 1995)
ASI Industries = As i in does tries! (1996 - current date)
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.msi-microstar,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"Jack" <jack@hello.com> wrote in message
news:3645dpF4t85smU1@individual.net...
> "David Johnstone" <david_ffm@mail.com> wrote in message
> news:ctijfk$mq1$00$1@news.t-online.com...
> >
> >> Hence the reason for my concern. I previously had an Athlon XP 2000 and
> >> it
> >> ran anywhere between 40C and 60C - therefore my new chip running at 13C
> >> is
> >> worryingly low for me... I find it hard to believe it's correct. :)
> >
> > What's your ambient temperature?
>
> Above 13C. ;)
>
> > If it's above 13°C (very likely) and you are
> > not using Peltier or phase change cooling then a false temperature
reading
> > is
> > the only possibility left I would say.
>
> Yeah. I'll look out for another BIOS update then...

Make sure you don't have any other monitoring software installed
too (eg the old version, or MBM5 etc) as they usually (always?)
interfere with each other - a problem with the design of the SMbus,
I think.
HTH
--
Rob
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.msi-microstar,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

On Mon, 31 Jan 2005 14:50:29 GMT, "ASI Industries"
<ASIIndustries@(removeme)asi-industries.freeserve.co.uk>
wrote:

>Hi Jack, why dont you check the temperatures with a Digital thermometer
>also some Digital Multi Meters have a thermometer function too.
>
>Yes 13%C does seem a bit too low for my liking too, likewise i have a ASUS
>A7V600-X with and overheating Via KT600 chipset, the bios and Everest
>reports about 30%C, rarly changes (sometimes it jumps 20-30%C in a single
>step), but my DMM reports between 28 from cold rising 1%C every 3 seconds
>to 55%C just sitting idle, under load it rises to 65%C, the DMM sensor is
>placed in bottom of HS on the top side opposite the core.
>
>Cpu: XP3200+ 26 - 35 idle, 36 - 55%C under load
>chipset: 28 - 55 idle, 56 - 65%C, (highest recorded so far)
>HDD: 18 - 25%C
>Room: 18 - 22%C

65C is not "overheating", it is within the specs for the
chip. It's actually a good compromise to have a stable chip
with passive cooling, rather than one cooler than it needs
be, with the added noise and maintenance of a fan.

Even so, sometimes the 'sink interface isn't too good.
Sadly it's even common for boards to have a thermal
interface material that doesn't even touch the center
heat-spreader of (chips incorporating such a spreader) due
to it being sunk below the plane of the outer epoxy
(carrier) border.

If it's really bothering you, taking off the 'sink and
checking the interface is one option, perhaps it can be
improved. I have an A7V600 and note no overheating
problems. The 'sink is fairly warm but so are most chipsets
@ 200MHz/DDR400 FSB and higher.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.msi-microstar,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

Jack writes:

> I have CoolNQuiet (http://www.amdboard.com/coolnquiet.html) switched on and
> an Athlon-64 3400 Clawhammer (2.2GHz) with a Arctic Cooling Silencer 64 fan.
> Can this be real? I'm concerned that the temps are being misreported...

Unless you are using active cooling (like a refrigeration system), the
CPU temperature cannot be less than that of the ambient air; and usually
it will be well above it.

My poorly-designed desktop runs with its Athlon processor between 53°
and 64° C. It used to be even worse, until I added a case fan (which
the manufacturer was too cheap to install).

In my old server, which was exactly the same kind of box, the BIOS
couldn't display more than two digits for temperatures in Celsius. When
the OS got stuck in a loop after the CPU fan failed, the temperature
reached at least 114° C (240° F), but the BIOS displayed only two digits
(fortunately, it also gave the temperature in Fahrenheit with three
digits, which is how I knew what was happening--although the smell gave
it away, too).

--
Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.msi-microstar,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

kony writes:

> 65C is not "overheating", it is within the specs for the
> chip. It's actually a good compromise to have a stable chip
> with passive cooling, rather than one cooler than it needs
> be, with the added noise and maintenance of a fan.

Cooler components last longer, although most PCs are probably dumped
before added heat damages the components. A processor that runs hot
will very gradually deteriorate over the years as dopants tend to drift
more quickly in the chip. However, except in the case of processors
that truly overheated, I've not seen processors fail. If they run for
48 hours, they'll run forever. But why take chances by running them any
hotter than necessary?

--
Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.msi-microstar,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

On Tue, 01 Feb 2005 04:07:35 +0100, Mxsmanic
<mxsmanic@hotmail.com> wrote:

>kony writes:
>
>> 65C is not "overheating", it is within the specs for the
>> chip. It's actually a good compromise to have a stable chip
>> with passive cooling, rather than one cooler than it needs
>> be, with the added noise and maintenance of a fan.
>
>Cooler components last longer, although most PCs are probably dumped
>before added heat damages the components. A processor that runs hot
>will very gradually deteriorate over the years as dopants tend to drift
>more quickly in the chip. However, except in the case of processors
>that truly overheated, I've not seen processors fail. If they run for
>48 hours, they'll run forever. But why take chances by running them any
>hotter than necessary?

Then what solution to you propose? Fans have far shorter
lifespan than the ICs.

There may indeed be a chance it won't then last 30 years,
but IMO, the principle focus should always be the earlier
failure points rather than the latter... fans, caps,
mechanical switchs and contacts are more likely to cause
failure at which point the systems aren't worth the time or
expense to fix (if it's even reasonable to track down some
of the older parts beyond proprietary industrial
applications).
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.msi-microstar,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

"BORG" <borg@deadspam.com> wrote in message
news:nf0qv01n80en6p577sn8rn1ghovl8orp0s@4ax.com...
> On 30 Jan 2005 11:14:01 GMT, "Jack" <jack@hello.com> wrote:
>
>>I have CoolNQuiet (http://www.amdboard.com/coolnquiet.html)
>
> Anything like this for a none 64 Bit Xp chip, I'd love to get mine
> down a bit in the shuttle ?

Nope, its a feature of the processor/mobo

>
> --
> arjftebhcf@jryfutbi.pb.hx<--ROT13 it
> Spam Trap in Header
>
> Child Birth is hereditary,
> If your parents didn't have any children
> Then the chances are you wont.
>
>
> http://borg.no-ip.com
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.msi-microstar,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

On Sun, 30 Jan 2005 15:49:38 +0000, BORG <borg@deadspam.com>
wrote:

>On 30 Jan 2005 11:14:01 GMT, "Jack" <jack@hello.com> wrote:
>
>>I have CoolNQuiet (http://www.amdboard.com/coolnquiet.html)
>
>Anything like this for a none 64 Bit Xp chip, I'd love to get mine
>down a bit in the shuttle ?

Athlon XP can use HALT idle cooling with an OS that supports
ACPI. Some boards allow enabling it in the bios (might be
called "S2K" but others require software to program chipset
registers (like WPCREdit, WPCRSet). Google search for it
including phrases like "<name of your shuttle board's
chipset> HLT cooling"
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.msi-microstar,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

kony writes:

> Then what solution to you propose?

Fans, and several of them. On my homebuilt server, there are seven
fans. Three in the power supply (supplied with the PSU), one on the
processor (supplied with the processor), plus three 8-cm fans I added:
two in the front blowing air into the case and drawing it through a
filter, arranged to blow past the disk drives, and one on the side of
the case over the processor, blowing air down over the processor and
drawing it through a filter. So three fans take air in, and one takes
it out, which should create slight positive pressure (the remaining air
just flows out the top and back of the case).

I figure that the machine should still be safe with any single fan
failure, and possibly with two fan failures. The Intel processor
protects itself if the fan fails; the rest of the machine has multiple
fans so that the PSU and MB should be kept acceptably cool even if one
of them drops out.

> Fans have far shorter lifespan than the ICs.

That's why I have more fans than I need. If one fails, the machine
won't cook (unlike its predecessor, whose AMD processor did exactly that
when the CPU fan failed). I'm very aware of the sound they make and any
change alerts me; I also explicitly check to see if air is flowing
through them periodically.

Needless to say, I don't care about noise. I actually like hearing
components running, because it makes it possible to detect when they
stop running. Over all three machines, I have some 13 fans running.

--
Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.msi-microstar,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

I'm seeing the same behavior on my MSI K8T Neo2-FIR mobo. The board
shipped with BIOS version 3.0. The CPU and system temperatures reported
by the BIOS in PC Health Status and by Core Center were in agreement at
around 39 and 34 deg. C, respectively, when the CPU is idle. The CPU
temp. under 100% CPU load was 47 deg. C.

Then I upgraded to BIOS 3.2 which has a fix for "BIOS reporting
incorrect CPU temperature". After that, the CPU temperature reported by
Core Center varies wildly from 11 to 29 deg. C while the system
temperature is around 30 deg. C. Meanwhile, PC Health Status in the
BIOS reports 34 for CPU and 30 for system. The ambient air temperature
outside the PC is 19 deg. C.

I upgraded to BIOS 3.3, and the behavior is the same 3.2. I have been
e-mailing MSI Tech Support, but I had a hard time convincing the rep.
that there is a bug in the BIOS or Core Center as demonstrated by the
discrepancy in CPU temp. reported by the two. After many attempts, he
sent me a newer version of the BIOS today. I'll try it tonight, but I'm
not holding my breath.

Kevin


Jack wrote:
> I have just updated the drivers for my MSI K8T Neo mobo, updated my
BIOS and
> updated the MSI "CoreCenter" monitoring software.
>
> CoreCenter and the BIOS both give me temperature readings for my CPU.
Before
> the updates the BIOS and CoreCenter reported my CPU as having
temperatures
> of between 39C and 51C depending on the room temp and what I was
doing. This
> seemed a fairly normal temperature and I was satisfied with it.
>
> However since the updates my CPU temperature has went way down
according to
> this software. When I go into the BIOS it's reporting the temp as
19C. When
> I'm sitting idle in Windows XP - as I am now - it's sitting at 13C! I
tested
> it by encoding a large MP3 and it went up to 27C after 5 mins of
encoding.
>
> I have CoolNQuiet (http://www.amdboard.com/coolnquiet.html) switched
on and
> an Athlon-64 3400 Clawhammer (2.2GHz) with a Arctic Cooling Silencer
64 fan.
> Can this be real? I'm concerned that the temps are being
misreported...
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.msi-microstar,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

On Tue, 01 Feb 2005 16:54:43 +0100, Mxsmanic
<mxsmanic@hotmail.com> wrote:

>kony writes:
>
>> Then what solution to you propose?
>
>Fans, and several of them. On my homebuilt server, there are seven
>fans. Three in the power supply (supplied with the PSU), one on the
>processor (supplied with the processor), plus three 8-cm fans I added:
>two in the front blowing air into the case and drawing it through a
>filter, arranged to blow past the disk drives, and one on the side of
>the case over the processor, blowing air down over the processor and
>drawing it through a filter. So three fans take air in, and one takes
>it out, which should create slight positive pressure (the remaining air
>just flows out the top and back of the case).
>

Ok, if the heat (or RPM reduction for reduced noise)
warrants that many fans, but those fans will not reduce the
northbridge temp much, if we're going under the presumption
that the case was already properly ventilated. Even with
the fans, most likely each and every fan would fail long
before the northbridge. Perhaps not while machine is newer
and valuable enough to be well-kept, but given enough time,
it's not likely anyone would find use or value in the system
by the time it's THAT old.


>I figure that the machine should still be safe with any single fan
>failure, and possibly with two fan failures. The Intel processor
>protects itself if the fan fails; the rest of the machine has multiple
>fans so that the PSU and MB should be kept acceptably cool even if one
>of them drops out.

That is a good idea, so long as it suits your needs. I buy
fans by the case so I too can do this at reasonable cost
without sacrificing fan quality, but I regularly see people
paying upwards of $10 per fan - buying fewer because they
have not the budget or inclination to add so many fans.

>
>> Fans have far shorter lifespan than the ICs.
>
>That's why I have more fans than I need. If one fails, the machine
>won't cook (unlike its predecessor, whose AMD processor did exactly that
>when the CPU fan failed). I'm very aware of the sound they make and any
>change alerts me; I also explicitly check to see if air is flowing
>through them periodically.
>
>Needless to say, I don't care about noise. I actually like hearing
>components running, because it makes it possible to detect when they
>stop running. Over all three machines, I have some 13 fans running.

This may be where we differ somewhat, I don't have a single
fan running at over (roughly) 3000 RPM, and only then on a
couple of overclocked gaming video cards where there is more
of a space constraint. Usually I'll want an optimized fan
RPM such that it reduces dust builtup and bearing wear even
on remote systems outside of audible range. The noisiest
things in some/most of my audible systems are WD
ball-bearing based hard drives, but fortunately WD has now
switched over to all fluid bearing models AFAIK.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.msi-microstar,uk.comp.homebuilt (More info?)

Hi Kony, sorry i forgot to mention when the chipset got to 65%C, (3 hours
playing heavy 3d games), the mainboard heat protection system cut in and
switched the system off, even though i disabled the heat sensors in the
bios!

The board is not in a case, just sitting on a worktop, i have replaced the
thermal compound, that made no difference, added a chipset fan, that
doubled the time before it crashes (6 hours playing heavy 3d games),
replaced the stock hs with a Zalman Zm-nb47j hs (its 4x the size of stock
hs and wieghs 54g) it reduced the temperature overall by 6%C.

Relocated the 12cm fan to cover both cpu hs and Zalman chipset hs brings
the
temperature down around 22 - 26%C and the stock hs brings the temperature
down around 28 - 35%C, currently using Zalman Cnps6000b-cu cpu hsf.

>65C is not "overheating", it is within the specs for the chip.
Can you provide any urls for the specifications of the Via Kt600
northbridge chipset?
--
Andrew Mcintosh
ASI Industries = Alpha Soft International Industries. (1990 - 1995)
ASI Industries = As i in does tries! (1996 - current date)
 

TRENDING THREADS