Question CPU temps in 80s-90s. Any suggestions?

Jul 5, 2020
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I got a prebuilt ABS PC from Newegg. Specs are:

CPU: Intel 10850k
CPU Cooler: GAMDIAS AIO Liquid Cooler (newegg link here)
GPU: EVGA 3080 GPU
Motherboard: Z490 AORUS PRO AX
Case: Rosewill Spectra D100 (newegg link here); it has 3 intake fans and one exhaust fan
RAM: G Skillz Trident 32GB 3200Mhz

During some games like Halo, the CPU temps are not too bad (50-60C). During more demanding games like COD Warzone and Microsoft Flight Simulator, the CPU temps can hang around the 80s, and occasionally go as high as 90. Occasionally it may crash when it gets to 95.

I updated the Motherboard's BIOS to the latest version. Still no luck. The CPU cooler is controlled manually with a remote controller; I increased the fan speed to the maximum, and it still didn't change the temperature at all even though the fan noise level was noticeably louder.

1. What else can I do to quell the CPU temperatures? Is there some trouble shooting I can do with the motherboard to prevent it from getting that hot, even if I sacrifice some FPS in the games? To my knowledge, I'm not overclocking, or trying to. I'm just letting the pre-built PC do its thing out of the box.

2. What would be the benefit of going with a different case (such as a Cooler Master H500)? The Rosewill Spectra d100 is a budget $50 case that ABS is using b/c it increases their profit margin. I haven't seen detailed thermals on it online; it has 3 intake and one exhaust.

3. What would be the benefit of using a different CPU cooler altogether? I didn't find much information on this GAMDIAS CPU cooler; reviews seem okay, and again, I get the vibe ABS is using it b/c it's cheap and increases their profit margin. But I'm not too knowledgeable about CPU coolers to know if upgrading to a different CPU cooler will make all the difference since this is also a Liquid AIO cooler.

The GPU temps are at a rock solid 78-79C and never go higher than that.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Where do you have the pump connected, and is the header the pump is connected to set for 100% full speed operation at all times? If not, it should be.

Overall though, I think it's likely that it's simply a pretty crappy product, because just about every review of Gamdias products I've ever seen in the past has been negative.

Also, where is the radiator installed, which side of the radiator are the fans installed on and which direction are the fans blowing, in or out?
 

delaro

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1. Which AIO do you have because that like is dead.

( Will cover up to 200W but optimally these are better for CPU's under 185W)
M1A 240R
M2 240 Lite
M2 240R

(Will Cover up to 220W but optimally these are better for CPU's that hit peaks of up to 200W)
M1A 280R
M2 280R

2. Is MCE ON?

Typically it is by default which will make your CPU Ramp up to its Max OC and draw up to 225W " Over powered" for the 240's.

3. Is everything installed correctly?

Thermal paste was applied evenly and the mounting pressure is equal on all four sides.

4. Have you tried changing the profile for the pump speed at different temps?

The pump speed is the only thing the system has control over.


Will changing the case help temps? Not by much since you are running 3X Intake and 1X Exhaust now.
 
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Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
That link works fine for me. Shows to be the GAMDIAS CHOINE M1A 240R.

And, this was a prebuilt system. If something is wrong, it should go right back to the retailer or manufacturer unless it's something particularly easy to fix OR something that you simply want to replace because you know that what it came with isn't very good, like that cooler.

One thing though, well, two actually.

One, I don't see ANY mention of WHAT PSU model came with that system, SPECIFICALLY, the exact model?

Two, it's very unusual that an ABS prebuilt system would come with a Rosewill case, even though they are both Newegg companies, since ABS sells their own case models and all of their prebuilt systems that I've come across have had ABS cases as well. Of course, that doesn't mean it can't have something else, or perhaps had an option for an upgraded chassis, it just seems unusual.
 
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Thanks for the help. I'll try to figure out how to look into the motherboard stuff. I'm honestly not sure how to check with the thermal paste stuff and whether it was applied evenly since I didn't construct the system.

What I may consider doing is getting my own Liquid Cooler (Corsair H100i, NZXT Kracken, perhaps? Maybe Arctic Liquid Freezer ii), and switching it out. If it fixes it, I may just accept that $100-$150 loss and be done with it. If it doesn't fix it, I can consider sending it back for ar eturn.

The only reason I got this pre-built was b/c I really wanted a gaming PC with the 3080, and there was no end in sight to the 3080 shortage. I'm not sure if Big Navi will run Flight Simulator like I want it to, and whether they will be in stock, so I pulled the trigger.

If I get another liquid cooler, what exactly do I need to get? Do most liquid coolers come with thermal paste, or is that something I need to get on my own?

I'm admittingly a bit apprehensive about dissecting the PC, which was the reason I got it pre-built in the first place. I don't want to mess something up. I'll have to watch some Youtube videos on how to do this. I know for most ppl here it's not hard b/c they do it all the time. I just have a busy day job, and the PC was shipped from California, and I don't want to ship it back there to have a CPU cooler exchanged...
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Most AIO coolers come with a "thermal pad" pre-applied.

It really doesn't have anything to do with "doing it all the time", because I see plenty of people who've assembled and configured tens or dozens of systems that still don't do it correctly or make mistakes, and then plenty of others who've never done it before, ever, and get it right on the first try because they DO bother to watch some videos, read some tutorials, ask some questions and just generally become very familiar with what they have to do before they do it, rather than just guessing or doing it a certain way because "I've always done it that way", and "that way" turns out to be the "wrong way". LOL.

So, I'd be inclined to just replace the cooler, but before you do that perhaps you can take a look in the BIOS (Normally accessed by pressing F2 or Delete, repeatedly, as soon as you power on the system from a shut down state, until you see that it has entered the BIOS setup program) and find the configuration settings for the fan header that your pump is connected to (Will require actually LOOKING at the motherboard and pump to see which fan header the pump cable is attached to) and making sure that that header is set up for full speed operation at all times. If it is not, then I'd set it's profile to always on or configure the fan curve so that it is.
 
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Most AIO coolers come with a "thermal pad" pre-applied.

It really doesn't have anything to do with "doing it all the time", because I see plenty of people who've assembled and configured tens or dozens of systems that still don't do it correctly or make mistakes, and then plenty of others who've never done it before, ever, and get it right on the first try because they DO bother to watch some videos, read some tutorials, ask some questions and just generally become very familiar with what they have to do before they do it, rather than just guessing or doing it a certain way because "I've always done it that way", and "that way" turns out to be the "wrong way". LOL.

So, I'd be inclined to just replace the cooler, but before you do that perhaps you can take a look in the BIOS (Normally accessed by pressing F2 or Delete, repeatedly, as soon as you power on the system from a shut down state, until you see that it has entered the BIOS setup program) and find the configuration settings for the fan header that your pump is connected to (Will require actually LOOKING at the motherboard and pump to see which fan header the pump cable is attached to) and making sure that that header is set up for full speed operation at all times. If it is not, then I'd set it's profile to always on or configure the fan curve so that it is.
Thanks for the help.

This last part sounds a bit thorny for me, but I'll check into it.

This Gamdias cooler is made so that the fan speed is only controlled with a remote only, I think. With the remote, you can also change the lighting colors, effects. I increased the fan speed to its max (there was a noticeable increase in sound coming from it, so I know for fact it was going up in RPM), and it still didnt turn down the temps when I was doing some stuff in Flight Simulator. I'm not even sure if it's made to be able to controlled from the motherboard, to be honest, but I'm not sure.

You're right though, the Gamdias cooler doesn't have a good reputation online. It's a shame that ABS is using such hardware. They're maybe making some extra profit here or there by cutting corners, but it reflects poorly on them. Lots of reviewers on newegg for this same ABS Gladiator PC talk about how the CPU temps are high, and one person replaced it with a Noctua NH-D15 even, with some good results.

I went ahead and bought an Arctic Liquid Freezer 240 (revered highly by Gamersnexus and with solid benchmarks), and some Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut. Not sure if I need the thermalpaste, but figure it can't hurt, and I can always return it if I don't need it. If it doesn't work, I can return the PC and just make my own. If it works, I'll stick with it, and maybe even get a better case. I want this PC to last 7-8 years minimum, and don't want high CPU temps killing the motherboard or something.

Appreciate your help!
 

delaro

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Thanks for the help.

This last part sounds a bit thorny for me, but I'll check into it.

This Gamdias cooler is made so that the fan speed is only controlled with a remote only, I think. With the remote, you can also change the lighting colors, effects. I increased the fan speed to its max (there was a noticeable increase in sound coming from it, so I know for fact it was going up in RPM), and it still didnt turn down the temps when I was doing some stuff in Flight Simulator. I'm not even sure if it's made to be able to controlled from the motherboard, to be honest, but I'm not sure.

You're right though, the Gamdias cooler doesn't have a good reputation online. It's a shame that ABS is using such hardware. They're maybe making some extra profit here or there by cutting corners, but it reflects poorly on them. Lots of reviewers on newegg for this same ABS Gladiator PC talk about how the CPU temps are high, and one person replaced it with a Noctua NH-D15 even, with some good results.

I went ahead and bought an Arctic Liquid Freezer 240 (revered highly by Gamersnexus and with solid benchmarks), and some Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut. Not sure if I need the thermalpaste, but figure it can't hurt, and I can always return it if I don't need it. If it doesn't work, I can return the PC and just make my own. If it works, I'll stick with it, and maybe even get a better case. I want this PC to last 7-8 years minimum, and don't want high CPU temps killing the motherboard or something.

Appreciate your help!
Not sure how you're coming up with ABS on the AIO:unsure:
The Base is Cooper
The Rad is Aluminum
The tubs are Teflon and sleeved.

It's a 240 and if MCE is on your overpowering the thing which many reviews of the CPU itself will point out being an issue.
If you don't tighten the thumbscrews in the right sequence it's easy to make the thing cocked and uneven.
You have manual limited fan speed control but your system can control the Pump speed, max that out by changing your profiles.

Replacing the pump would be the better option, those are nice and blingy by the 240's themselves have a performance slightly behind an NH-D15. If you're replacing it then avoid Air and 240 AIO's because at some point when you want that added performance you're going to need the thermal headroom.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
I agree. I would definitely not go with a 240mm AIO for that CPU. You should be looking at 280 or 360mm models, which that case supports.

And, while I agree that Gamersnexus has given a thumbs up for the Arctic liquid freezer AIO models, they have also made it abundantly clear that they have no idea what the longevity of those units is going to be like because the fact is that the majority of Arctic's products are pretty cheaply made, and no attempt to hide that fact. They are clearly, all, decent, but budget oriented hardware, including their fans and heatsink coolers, but they are almost certainly a step up from anything that Gamedias sells that I've seen.

You should seriously consider cancelling that order and going with the 280mm version of that, or another cooler, if you really want to have something that's going to be capable enough to handle that CPU. Considering that the 10850k can pull up to around 285w under a full load, and while the paper specs say that liquid freezer 240 is able to handle up to 300w, that's just not very realistic unless you want to hear it screaming at full speed anytime the CPU is at boost speeds. Even then, it's pretty doubtful that it would last very long under those kind of conditions without the fan or pump giving out prematurely at some point. Just my 2cents, but definitely something you should think about.
 

Pitbull Tyson

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I got a prebuilt ABS PC from Newegg. Specs are:

CPU: Intel 10850k
CPU Cooler: GAMDIAS AIO Liquid Cooler (newegg link here)
GPU: EVGA 3080 GPU
Motherboard: Z490 AORUS PRO AX
Case: Rosewill Spectra D100 (newegg link here); it has 3 intake fans and one exhaust fan
RAM: G Skillz Trident 32GB 3200Mhz

During some games like Halo, the CPU temps are not too bad (50-60C). During more demanding games like COD Warzone and Microsoft Flight Simulator, the CPU temps can hang around the 80s, and occasionally go as high as 90. Occasionally it may crash when it gets to 95.

I updated the Motherboard's BIOS to the latest version. Still no luck. The CPU cooler is controlled manually with a remote controller; I increased the fan speed to the maximum, and it still didn't change the temperature at all even though the fan noise level was noticeably louder.

1. What else can I do to quell the CPU temperatures? Is there some trouble shooting I can do with the motherboard to prevent it from getting that hot, even if I sacrifice some FPS in the games? To my knowledge, I'm not overclocking, or trying to. I'm just letting the pre-built PC do its thing out of the box.

2. What would be the benefit of going with a different case (such as a Cooler Master H500)? The Rosewill Spectra d100 is a budget $50 case that ABS is using b/c it increases their profit margin. I haven't seen detailed thermals on it online; it has 3 intake and one exhaust.

3. What would be the benefit of using a different CPU cooler altogether? I didn't find much information on this GAMDIAS CPU cooler; reviews seem okay, and again, I get the vibe ABS is using it b/c it's cheap and increases their profit margin. But I'm not too knowledgeable about CPU coolers to know if upgrading to a different CPU cooler will make all the difference since this is also a Liquid AIO cooler.

The GPU temps are at a rock solid 78-79C and never go higher than that.
I would not worry at all about those temps. There is a TJ Max grab Core Temp and it will show you how far away you are from TJ MAX. Once it reaches that temp depending on your motherboard the computer will shut off to protect the CPU from dying. Most CPU's including yours can sustain even 100c for a while but something that would need to get addressed asap ya know.✝
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
I would not worry at all about those temps. There is a TJ Max grab Core Temp and it will show you how far away you are from TJ MAX. Once it reaches that temp depending on your motherboard the computer will shut off to protect the CPU from dying. Most CPU's including yours can sustain even 100c for a while but something that would need to get addressed asap ya know.✝
I'm sorry, but this is dangerously inaccurate. You obviously have not read, nor understood, the Intel temperature guide and it would be a good idea to do so before handing out recommendations like this again in the future. I'm sure it was simply a lack of the right information, and not any attempt on your part to mislead the OP.

 

Pitbull Tyson

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I'm sorry, but this is dangerously inaccurate. You obviously have not read, nor understood, the Intel temperature guide and it would be a good idea to do so before handing out recommendations like this again in the future. I'm sure it was simply a lack of the right information, and not any attempt on your part to mislead the OP.

Are we talking Intel or AMD now IM all confused I apologize. I think each CPU is different but TJ MAX can be found in plethora of apps and that is the max before the computer will shutdown if your BIOS is a good one for that matter, saving the CPU's life. Most modern motherboards know if the fan on the CPU cooler stops so they can quickly turn down system or if pump fails etc.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
The last time I checked, the 10850k was an Intel CPU, but modern AMD CPUs from the Ryzen and Threadripper families abide by almost identical thermal guidelines, with 80°C being the recommended limit for full load operations, and 85°C being the "ok, now we're getting into bad territory" guideline. Anything beyond that, is inching closer and closer (Or is already at) to the kind of configuration that is likely going to produce electromigration and VT shift on any CPU being used continuously in such a fashion.

Besides which, it is NEVER ok to say "it's ok to run your CPU up to the limit where it hard throttles or shuts down", because repeatedly doing so will absolutely degrade your hardware in cumulative fashion. Running at or near TJ Max is neither recommended nor "ok". It is a last ditch effort by the hardware to save itself from catastrophic failure, and nothing more. It is not the "edge" of what is considered a safe range. It is fully "IN" the "ah crap, now you've done it" zone. Especially if you are regularly or continuously doing so.
 
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Pitbull Tyson

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The last time I checked, the 10850k was an Intel CPU, but modern AMD CPUs from the Ryzen and Threadripper families abide by almost identical thermal guidelines, with 80°C being the recommended limit for full load operations, and 85°C being the "ok, now we're getting into bad territory" guideline. Anything beyond that, is inching closer and closer (Or is already at) to the kind of configuration that is likely going to produce electromigration and VT shift on any CPU being used continuously in such a fashion.

Besides which, it is NEVER ok to say "it's ok to run your CPU up to the limit where it hard throttles or shuts down", because repeatedly doing so will absolutely degrade your hardware in cumulative fashion. Running at or near TJ Max is neither recommended nor "ok". It is a last ditch effort by the hardware to save itself from catastrophic failure, and nothing more. It is not the "edge" of what is considered a safe range. It is fully "IN" the "ah crap, now you've done it" zone. Especially if you are regularly or continuously doing so.
The 10th gen can go to 100c and still survive. If you must go to their website and check their max temp or tj max temp. A CPU is meant to get hotso it can function properly. 80's c while gaming is a lot since your not using all your CPU cores or entire system to max. For gaming people should get 60's c on any CPU IMO. Then stress test besides prime95 80'c and what not.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
My car can survive driving down the road at 40mph with flat tires. It doesn't mean it's a good, or wise idea, to do that. And what a CPU can "survive" at, one or even a few times, explicitly does not suggest that in doing so there is no opportunity for damage to occur. Yes, it would likely be minimal, and not noticeable, for a single occurrence, but when it happens repeatedly, which is what you've suggested is ok to allow when you say "I would not worry at all about those temps" knowing that his CPU is "occasionally hitting 90°C", there is a very real probability of electromigration and VT shift. Again, I would highly recommend you educate yourself as to what those are, because it's fairly clear you currently don't have a working understanding of those conditions.

80°C is the limit of what is "recommended", and that is a recommendation that applies to a full on FULL thermal load test, meaning Prime95 Small FFT (AVX, AVX2 and AVX512 disabled). If you are EVER hitting 80° under normal gaming conditions, or doing anything other than specifically stress or thermal testing, or possibly a very few encoding or other applications that make heavy use of AVX instructions, then something is wrong with your hardware, or you lack adequate cooling or you have a poorly configured system, because you should not ever come close to that temperature under a normal situation unless you are running a system that is overclocked beyond it's capabilities.

A stock system should never, ever, come anywhere near those temperatures without you absolutely knowing that something isn't right.
 

delaro

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A CPU is meant to get hotso it can function properly.
From an engineering standpoint that just makes my head hurt. :homer: I guess overclockers should be torching their CPU's instead of freezing the bejeezus out of them.

The 10th gen can go to 100c and still survive.
The issue isn't so much the CPU, it's the motherboard that doesn't like trying to keep up with the voltage demand on the CPU running way to hot. 14nm has been extended way too long and this is what you get, CPU's that draw a stupid amount of power and get instantly hot. The best AIO's on the market still struggles to keep these chips overclocked under 75 °C
 

Pitbull Tyson

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From an engineering standpoint that just makes my head hurt. :homer: I guess overclockers should be torching their CPU's instead of freezing the bejeezus out of them.

The issue isn't so much the CPU, it's the motherboard that doesn't like trying to keep up with the voltage demand on the CPU running way to hot. 14nm has been extended way too long and this is what you get, CPU's that draw a stupid amount of power and get instantly hot. The best AIO's on the market still struggles to keep these chips overclocked under 75 °C
Full load 75c overclocked is good. 50's to 60;'s c when gaming.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Hot, warm or cold, it really doesn't matter. Well, CPUs are never "cold" so really it's just down to warm, hot or too hot. And and long as they are not "too hot" then it really doesn't matter. It's not like NAND where it performs better at a given temperature. So long as you are within the acceptable recommended range, then the CPU is going to operate the same throughout the full range of it's thermal envelope. There's a reason you don't ever see engineers, labs or reviewers testing CPUs at 50°C versus 78°C to see if there is a difference in performance, because there won't be, unless of course it's something like Ryzen where it's boost profiles are actually DESIGNED to allow higher boost and for longer periods of time, if the package or core temperatures are lower than what it will if you are at or near the recommended limit, which for Ryzen, based on deep dives, seems to have settled at about 80°C after having been lowered from there and then raised back up.

For Intel, we're beginning to see some of this evolve into their architectures as well.
 
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Thanks for the replies all. The CPU temps have gotten slightly better recently. Not sure if the new BIOS update is kicking in more, or maybe just it becoming winter and colder weather helping cool things down?

It's still going into the 80s occasionally when I run Flight Simulator under the most demanding places (like flying over Tokyo or San Francisco at fast speeds with the drone camera), but not going into the upper 80s/low 90s as much as it was before. And when I'm going over less demanding places (like flying over mountains and glaciers, or smaller cities), it's usually now 60s-70s.

I had already cancelled the Arctic liquid 240 like you had mentioned. Thanks for that advice. Warranty on it is only 2 years compared to 6 years on Cosair and NZXT AIOS. I did order a Cooler Master H500 case, which seems to have solid thermals. I'm honestly not sure how much different it will be compared to the Rosewill Spectra D100; I don't see any thermals on it anywhere online, which makes me skeptical that it's good. It has 3 intakes on the front and one exhaust in the back (I think 120s), but the Cooler Master looks superior with its massive 200mm fans. I wanted this to be my case anyways b/c of how effective it is. I'm optimistic this new case will help at least somewhat.

If the CPU temps are still bad in this new case, then I will maybe update to an NZXT Kraken or Corsair H100i. I will change the CPU cooler if I continue to have issues, but so far things are slightly better than before. Changing the CPU cooler for me is a bit more thorny b/c I have to remove and reapply thermal paste. Changing to a new case won't be a walk in the park, but I will feel more comfortable if I need to put things back in the original case, rather than potentially needing to go back to the original GAMDIAS cooler if something comes up, and figuring out how to apply thermal paste again..
 

idkwhattonamethisacc

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I would switch to ryzen if i were you but you should wait till ryzen 5000 before switching because those will annihilate intels 10th gen cpus even in gaming no matter how far you are overclocking it and another thing, they will beat intels 10th gen while consuming less power so better wait till ryzen 5000 before switching, you should use a 5950x or 5900x since those are an upgrade in core count and gaming performance.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Thermal paste replacement is easy. Get some lint free or microfiber cleaning cloths, or paper coffee filters. Get a small bottle of 91% isopropyl alcohol. CAREFULLY, and gradually, (In fact, there are a TON of videos on Youtube explaining and showing exactly how this should be done) clean both the top of the CPU heat spreader and the bottom of the cold plate until there is no remaining thermal compound. Then apply about a half a pea sized amount dead center in the middle of the CPU and install the cooler exactly as you did the first time. Assuming you installed it correctly the first time of course. LOL.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
I would switch to ryzen if i were you but you should wait till ryzen 5000 before switching because those will annihilate intels 10th gen cpus even in gaming no matter how far you are overclocking it and another thing, they will beat intels 10th gen while consuming less power so better wait till ryzen 5000 before switching, you should use a 5950x or 5900x since those are an upgrade in core count and gaming performance.
"Switching to Ryzen" makes absolutely ZERO sense, at all, considering he has a latest generation i9-10850k processor, which currently is probably one of the three best gaming processors you could possibly have. Why would anybody do that? They wouldn't. It makes no sense.
 
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I would switch to ryzen if i were you but you should wait till ryzen 5000 before switching because those will annihilate intels 10th gen cpus even in gaming no matter how far you are overclocking it and another thing, they will beat intels 10th gen while consuming less power so better wait till ryzen 5000 before switching, you should use a 5950x or 5900x since those are an upgrade in core count and gaming performance.
Yea. Those would have been my preferred CPUs for sure. I was sort of in a tough bind b/c I wanted to start gaming sooner than later. The 3080s were not available, and then I saw this pre-built ABS build on Newegg available. I grabbed it b/c I didn't know when else I would get a chance to score a 3080 build. If the 3080s were freely available, I would have 100% waited for the Ryzen 5000 series, and used my own components.

Honestly, I'm not super picky on performance itself, compared to longetivity and efficiency as you point out (e.g., lower temps). I figure the Ryzen 5900x may end up having slightly higher FPS than the 10850k, but I also have a 4K TV that doesn't go higher than 60 Hz. I may get a 120Hz TV soon, but the difference is probably marginal compared with Intel. Intel may have 55 FPS on flight simulator, maybe the Ryzen breaks 59 or 60, for example. These are differences I won't be able to notice. I'll probably pay more attention to the differences of new technologies in 4-8 years when I upgrade my PC.

I'm happy I have a 3080 machine. I may have to change the case and CPU cooler, but that's maybe okay. If I end up returning it, I may have to wait another 2-3 months before I snag a 3080, but then by that point, I'd definitely just go with the new Ryzens.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Point is though, if you were still riding a much older model, like Haswell, or FX, or even Kaby lake, then it would make a lot more sense. Upgrading from a 10th Gen top of the line Intel processor to a Ryzen 5000 series makes no sense to anybody other than somebody that just has too much money and has to have the latest thing, every time a new latest thing comes along, or somebody with a lot more money than sense. The gain will be minimal if it exists at all, which we really don't know yet. Early benchmarks are RARELY accurate. Reviews always seem to tell a much different story.

I suspect we'll finally see parity between Intel and AMD with AMD PROBABLY being the slightly less expensive option, and also as mentioned, potentially being less power hungry. But to go from what you have to that would be like going from one 50,000 dollar car that can do 225mph to another 50,000 dollar car that can do 227mph. So you gained 2mph and spend another 50,000 dollars to get it. I can't see any way that makes sense to anybody.
 

idkwhattonamethisacc

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Maybe next time you should be more patient xD, ah well i guess you are gonna have slightly worse fps and a higher power bill for being to impatient xD
Yea. Those would have been my preferred CPUs for sure. I was sort of in a tough bind b/c I wanted to start gaming sooner than later. The 3080s were not available, and then I saw this pre-built ABS build on Newegg available. I grabbed it b/c I didn't know when else I would get a chance to score a 3080 build. If the 3080s were freely available, I would have 100% waited for the Ryzen 5000 series, and used my own components.

Honestly, I'm not super picky on performance itself, compared to longetivity and efficiency as you point out (e.g., lower temps). I figure the Ryzen 5900x may end up having slightly higher FPS than the 10850k, but I also have a 4K TV that doesn't go higher than 60 Hz. I may get a 120Hz TV soon, but the difference is probably marginal compared with Intel. Intel may have 55 FPS on flight simulator, maybe the Ryzen breaks 59 or 60, for example. These are differences I won't be able to notice. I'll probably pay more attention to the differences of new technologies in 4-8 years when I upgrade my PC.

I'm happy I have a 3080 machine. I may have to change the case and CPU cooler, but that's maybe okay. If I end up returning it, I may have to wait another 2-3 months before I snag a 3080, but then by that point, I'd definitely just go with the new Ryzens.
Edit : if you are gonna have a super inefficient cpu then why not just overclock it just so you can atleast brag about ur cpu being 5.5 ghz (which is still beaten in frequency to my now degraded p4 631 5.656ghz @ 1.8875vcore and 2.46v pll)
 

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