Question Desperately Looking for Mobo LGA 1151 that has at least HDMI 2.0a

Shinsetta

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I need some major help, guys. I purchased a Pioneer Blu-ray player that requires a motherboard with HDMI 2.0a. I need to know if I should return it soon. I have an i7-8700k so the motherboard has to be LGA 1151 Z390. I followed the advice of some of you guys. I think I looked through a hundreds of models to check to see if they had the HDMI specification that I need. I literally only found a single one.



I could only find a single motherboard that has HDMI 2.0a. (It has to be at least 2.0a not just HDMI 2.0.) Sometimes, spec sheets will just say HDMI 2.0 which can actually mean HDMI 2.0, 2.0a, or 2.0b.



The way to figure the actual HDMI type is to see what other mobo features are listed. If the mobo can output 60 FPS or HDR (high dynamic range)/WCG (wide color gamut), it means it’s at least HDMI 2.0a. Without HDR, it means it’s HDMI 2.0 or lower. If 30 FPS, it’s HDMI 2.0 or lower as well.



The only make/model I could find was the Asus WS Z390 Pro. I can’t believe that there isn’t another LGA 1151 motherboard with at least HDMI 2.0a.
 

Shinsetta

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Hi, Boju,

Thanks for the info! You are a godsend and a genius.

Are all Intel igpus have to be an Intel HD 630? Would you know if there be another type of integrated graphics processing unit besides the Intel 630 that is accompanied by an LGA 1151 mobo? I definitely don't want to upgrade my CPU because that would be so darn expensive.

Btw, it's not about the graphics card that's the issue. The Pioneer Blu-ray drive specifically requires that the mobo has to be HDMI 2.0a compliant. The monitor as well. I guess Intel is forcing people to upgrade their mobos and CPUs if they want to play Blu-ray 4k discs. Very smart move on their part but it's also possibly illegal according to antitrust laws. I doubt the Dept of Justice is going to do anything about it though. When have you last heard of an antitrust case except for the Microsoft case like decades ago when they were basically forced to do something.
 

Shinsetta

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Can possibly anyone ese answer this question:

Does an LGA 1151 motherboard have to have an integrated 630 graphics chip?

It doesn't even be have to be. If they don't offer enough alternatives, this is called tying and it's an antitrust violation. This is what Microsoft was found to have violated too, decades ago. If someone can let me know any info whether there aren't any alternatives to a 630 graphics chip, that a violation and I'll report it to the FTC.
 
The graphics chip is built into the CPU, not the motherboard.

Your i7 has the UHD630 baked in, so the GPU you will have is UHD630 and you will only have support for HDMI1.4, no matter what motherboard you put it into.

This isn't antitrust. Its just how it works. The IGPU supports only a certain standard, and it has supported the same standard since when you bought it.
 

boju

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Which bluray optical drive have you got?

Example with this model, https://www.pioneerelectronics.com/PUSA/Computer/Computer+Drives/BDR-212UBK

Is Hdmi 2.0b compatible but not required. I don't believe Pioneer would shoot themselves in the foot this way by limiting it's device to 2.0a/b only since Hdmi versions are backwards compatible.

Besides, Hdmi isn't the only video connection used these days when there's also Displayport and Displayport has been doing 4K 60Hz a lot longer than Hdmi has. They also wouldn't restrict it's devices to igpu only since some cpus/mobos don't even offer video so there would be no issue using a graphics card instead. Point being, your Pioneer BR shouldn't be restricted to the motherboard.

Regarding igpu, as Nighthawk said, nothing can be done there, igpu is incorporated into the cpu. Even the latest Intel 10th gen processors are still using HD 630.

There should be no issue running a graphics card and having bluray content play through.
 
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