Devs Clarify 'PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds' Crate-And-Key System, Release New Update

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Brian_227

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Apr 10, 2017
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It seems like every single game out there is doing this now. Does anybody actually enjoy this grifting scheme of gambling real money for virtual items that become useless and forgotten 3 months later?
 

termathor

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Jan 16, 2015
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@Brian,

It's a bit beyond me as well. I only remember paying 2 bucks once or twice in TF2, for special crates, before I realised the insane amount of money to unlock all the ones I had and the duplicate objects I got.
It's quite perverse as a system IMO.
 


Count me out. I mean seriously for some of these prices you could get a new GPU and another game. I refuse to contribute to this type of stuff. I was thinking about picking up PlayerUnknown but not know Ill just pass.
 

clonazepam

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I have played nickel slots on vacation in Vegas just to keep the champagne flowing. I suppose it could be something like that. If you spend what you could afford to lose down a storm drain without any negative consequences, its ok.

PUBG's 1st person view still needs a lot of work in my opinion. The perspective is all off. It feels like you're about 3 feet tall running around. Going prone is almost ant-like in its perspective.
 

LilDog1291

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Jan 9, 2013
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@Brian Dota 2 and Rocket League do the same thing and I love it. The items are purely superficial so if people want to blow their money on it, it doesn't impact gameplay at all. This way a game can continue to grow and garner developer support long after release unlike the yearly flavors of CoD and Battlefield.

Take Dota 2 for example. The prizepool for their International tournament in 2013 was ~2 million USD and today thanks to its growth it is greater than 22 million USD. This pool is purely funded on the same model of opening a crate, treasure, etc. with the chance of getting 1 out of so many possible items per container.

The traditional model of $60 for a game and thats it is over since developers are expected to continue to update and support a game long past the point of profitability. The simple fact is that if people don't like crates, they don't have to buy keys to open them and can essentially vote with their money.
 

Olle P

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Isn't that the very definition of buying a game?

I don't play this specific game, but if I did I'd think this "feature" is okay as long as you don't need to approach the crate to know that it requires a key to open.
 
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