Question Do I need to clean install W10 after CPU and MoBo change?

rasdane

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Hi,
Around 2 weeks ago, I built a new system based around Ryzen 5 3600x in an MSI B450 Tomahawk Max mobo.
  • If it matters, the rest of the system:
  • Memory: 16GB G.Skill at DDR4-3600
  • Case: Fractal Design Define R6
  • CPU Cooler: Noctua Chromax NH-U12S
  • PSU: Corsair RM 650W 80+ Gold
  • BootDrive: Intel 660p 1 TB M.2 SSD
  • Running Win10 64
  • GPU: PowerCooler Radeon Rx 460 4GB (I plan to upgrade to a 1660 Super or maybe a 2060 in the next few months)
  • Several external and internal HDDs (a mix of WD and Seagate) – I have to store large amounts of data for work purposes + my Plex library is not small
  • StarTech.com PEXUSB3S44V 4 Port PCIE SuperSpeed USB 3.0 Card
I was running into issues with the mobo, and needed more internal SATA ports... so I returned the CPU and motherboard in favor of:
  • Ryzen 3600 -- I'm hopeful that I can basically overclock it to get it close to the x-model performance anyway
  • Asus Tuf Gaming X570 Mobo (with Wifi)
All the other parts are the same.
Once I started everything up, it all seems to be working just fine.

But my question:
Am I being an idiot for not doing a clean install of Windows at this point?

Before deciding to make the CPU/mobo switch, I'd just restored everything back to the way I like it. It would take time (that I would love to save) to do it all again.
What are the dangers of not doing a clean install? Driver conflicts? And how serious is the difference really, given that I switched chipsets?
Any input is hugely appreciated. Thank you.
 

USAFRet

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Changing the motherboard/CPU, there are 3 possible outcomes:
  1. It boots up just fine
  2. It fails completely
  3. You're chasing little issues for weeks.
A clean install is always recommended, often required.

What was the old system?
 
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Hi,
Around 2 weeks ago, I built a new system based around Ryzen 5 3600x in an MSI B450 Tomahawk Max mobo.

All the other parts are the same.
Once I started everything up, it all seems to be working just fine.

But my question:
Am I being an idiot for not doing a clean install of Windows at this point?

Before deciding to make the CPU/mobo switch, I'd just restored everything back to the way I like it. It would take time (that I would love to save) to do it all again.
What are the dangers of not doing a clean install? Driver conflicts? And how serious is the difference really, given that I switched chipsets?
Any input is hugely appreciated. Thank you.
It is very close going from previous platform.
If it was the same b450 platform, I would suggest to leave it and skip the clean installation.
When you are going to a different platform issues might arrive and it will be very hard to pinpoint.
It could be drivers that always give you issues, a software that becomes glitchy and even a printer could stop working randomly.
You could take a chance and see how it goes.
If you encounter glitches then clean install Windows.
 
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rasdane

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My old-old system that I had since 2011 was:
  • HP stock case
  • CPU: Core i7-990X (Gulftown) (130W), 3.4 GHz 6-Core (Socket: LGA 1366)
  • MoBo: MiniATX Truckee-UL8E; Chipset: Intel X58 Express
  • CPU Cooler: The stock cooler the chip came with from Intel/HP
  • Memory: 16GB DDR3 (not sure of the speed)
  • GPU: PowerCooler Radeon Rx 460 4GB
  • Power Supply: HP Stock PSU 600 Watt
  • StarTech.com PEXUSB3S44V 4 Port PCIE SuperSpeed USB 3.0 Card
Plus a bunch of internal/external HDDs.


I only ran the R5 3600x/B450 version of the new system for like 10 days.

Per jojesa's answer, I'm thinking I might try to leave the new R5 3600/X570 version alone for a week or two and see how I make out. If I run into issues, I can always clean-install at that point.

Appreciate the quick replies. :)
 

rasdane

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To be clear, I did do a clean install 2 weeks ago for the B450 version.
No, if I hadn't, I don't think that would have worked either. :)

My concern is now going from R5 3600x/B450 to R5 3600/X570.
 

USAFRet

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To be clear, I did do a clean install 2 weeks ago for the B450 version.
No, if I hadn't, I don't think that would have worked either. :)

My concern is now going from R5 3600x/B450 to R5 3600/X570.
A new install before the hardware change doesn't count.

And since you did one just 2 weeks ago, there is little to lose in doing another one.
Just to be sure.
 
To be clear, I did do a clean install 2 weeks ago for the B450 version.
No, if I hadn't, I don't think that would have worked either. :)

My concern is now going from R5 3600x/B450 to R5 3600/X570.
I have gone from B350 to B450 and B350 to X570 without re-installing windows on several builds and no issues yet.
I usually, though take preventive measures.
Before moving to the new platform I uninstall all drivers then power off.
Then install the new motherboard and connect only the disk where Windows 10 was installed.
Windows install all drivers and whatever is missing I get it from hardware manufacturer.
Sometime Windows ask for activation since it recognizes the hardware change.
When Windows is done with updates then I plug any other disks.

I did tried going from Intel to AMD and everything appeared to work at first.
But I could not communicate properly with a wireless scanner, even after re-installing the software.
Also I have a video editing software that will crash randomly while rendering.
I was surprised that I only encountered those two issues.
 

Mr.Spock

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If it ain't broke... Likely you still have very generic drivers for all your devices based on the recent clean install. unless there are differences in the sound or network devices the standard AMD drivers probably will work fine. Any incompatible devices like network, USB3 or ME drivers will show in the device manager anyway. You should be good if you didn't install any drivers specific to the old B450 board.

the variables are usually things like Intel vs Realtek network drivers,
any 3rd pty ASMedia or IRST drivers (not an issue here)

To be clear, I did do a clean install 2 weeks ago for the B450 version.
No, if I hadn't, I don't think that would have worked either. :)

My concern is now going from R5 3600x/B450 to R5 3600/X570.
 
Last edited:

falcon291

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CPU change not needed.

Mobo change. If it is a replacement, I mean same brand, some model not needed. If you are also replacing a ROG Strix Z390-F with Z390-E, it would be OK.

But in any other scenario, for example replacing a ROG with Prime, even in case they are using the same chipset, I would do a clean install. (Probably they would work OK though)
 

USAFRet

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Installing software and games is time consuming and depending of the software you better have licences ready.
Sometime you might void licenses on expensive software by reinstalling them.
And that falls into planning for this major hardware change.
Gather all of that stuff before it is needed.

Last time I did a major change like this, I almost lost a $1,000 CAD package.
Almost.

But sometimes, that reinstall is absolutely required.
 

Mr.Spock

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and post #14 reiterates the fact that the O/S install is easy - restoring apps and configs is the pain

"To be clear, I did do a clean install 2 weeks ago for the B450 version "

So, not that much work.
And a hardware change does not care about how much work it takes for you to get things running. If a reinstall is needed...it is needed.
 

rasdane

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Thank you all for the feedback, really appreciate it. I’ll take the “better safe than sorry” approach and do a clean install. :). As others have pointed out, the W10 part is no biggie, it’s all the other stuff that takes time. But tomorrow is a day off, so there you go.
 
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