Does head crash = undetected by computer?

Jidis

Reputable
Feb 17, 2014
7
0
4,510
0
Sad day today. I tried to load a Ghost CD which had a small crack near the center hole in my main computer just to see if it was still readable. Drive gets up to full speed and CD shatters, sounding like a firecracker. I try to eject it, and it's now in a million tiny pieces which are wedged in the internals. I go down to the floor to try the force eject hole, and at some point, I look up to notice a Windows XP bluescreen. Force eject doesn't cut it, so I shut the machine off to get the possibly ruined DVD drive out.

After cleaning out the optical drive, I get everything back together and am getting "please insert..." errors like there's no HD. I've now tried a bunch of stuff and the drive definitely is not only unreadable, but is no longer even detected by two different computer's post sequences. After it spins up, if you're close enough, you can hear a really light knocking sound for a few seconds like the heads are trying to free themselves.

The questions- If there was a head crash,etc. leading to a mechanical issue, would the drive not even report itself to the computer like that? Or, if the drive's controller circuitry got zapped, causing it to not identify itself like that, could this cause repetitive nonsense mechanical movement like I'm hearing? I'm hoping it's the latter, and I have ordered a new duplicate drive which should be here in a few days. I plan to try swapping the controller board first. I know you're not supposed to do this, but if it stays the same, I may resort to going in it to see if I can tap something back into place.

Sorry for all the text and much thanks for any advice.
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
112,983
1,823
155,140
18,536
The death and shock of the DVD drive may have affected the HDD.

The drive can't report a "head crash", it would just simply be seen as unreadable.

And putting that drive+OS in a different PC and not being readable is not an indication of fail.
Not saying that it did not fail, but putting that drive in a different PC often fails simply because it is a different PC.

And if it was a momentary head crash, it may just mean that the data is corrupt. Leading to "Please inset boot media..."
It just can't find a valid OS to boot from.
Swapping the PCB will not fix that.
 

Jidis

Reputable
Feb 17, 2014
7
0
4,510
0
USAFRet,

Thanks! It's not even getting a chance to try to boot the system from HD or even read from it though. If I go into the bios' autodetect SATA drives page, this thing is now invisible. The boot message is actually something more like "Insert Boot CD". One of the things I was wondering was whether there was an initial mechanical action that a drive performs before it even identifies itself to the host, and maybe the mechanical failure is screwing up any subsequent functions (still hoping that's not the case).

Take Care (I'm a Klaymen/Neverhood fan BTW).
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY