Question DRAM light after PSU Upgrade

Nov 6, 2021
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Hello, I'm hoping someone can help.

I recently bought a rtx3070, after finding out that my current PSU did not have an extra 8 pin plug I ran out and bought a corsair rm850. Got everything hooked up and turned the pc on. Everything booted fine. After about 2 mins it froze and the DRAM light is solid orange. I took everything apart, pulled the cmos battery, also found out I missed the plug for my kraken AIO. Got that plugged in and the pc went to post so I figured that was it. I shut it down and buttoned it back up but now it won't boot again.

Any suggestions on what else I can try?
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.
 
Nov 6, 2021
2
0
10
0
BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.
Thank you. I did all of that and still couldn't get to post. I ended up moving the ram around and when I put 1 stick in b1 the pc would boot perfectly normal. Any other slot and it won't post. So I'm assuming the mobo is faulty.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Did you try the other DIMMs in that same slot, to make sure it isn't bad memory? If you did, and they all worked, then it still could be something other than the motherboard.

Since you'd have to pull the CPU anyhow to change boards, I'd pull it and make sure there are no bent pins on the CPU or motherboard, make sure that all the mounting hardware for the CPU cooler is evenly tightened and properly installed (Because a CPU that is "cocked" in the socked from improper installation of the CPU cooler can cause a variety of issues including mimicking bad memory or a faulty board, among other things). If all that is fine, then yes, the chances are good that it's the motherboard but it would be helpful to know what your exact hardware configuration includes? CPU, motherboard, memory kit model, etc.
 

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