[SOLVED] Ethernet connection drops randomly ?

notasandwich

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Recently upgraded some of my desktop component and now, after soloing a clean install after having had some issues even recognizing the network drivers, the Ethernet connection just randomly drops and then comes back from time to time. I cannot roll back or update drivers as it has the most current Intel I-122v drivers and has not had any previous working drivers.

Besides replacing the Ethernet cable; what can I do?
 
Media disconnected is almost always a hardware issue. Luckily it tends to be a bad cable most times rather than the port in the machine being bad.

Your best option is to buy a new cable being careful to not buy fake. The key thing is the wire must be pure copper wire and even more important is the wire size must be 22-24. Massive numbers of people are buy that flat cable which has tiny wires that do not meet the standards to be a actual ethernet cable.

In your case if the wire itself is quality wire you might consider replacing the just the ends. It likely going to be more expensive than replacing the cable but it depends on how much effort it is to rerun the cable. The wires themselves seldom go bad unless they are physically damaged, like a nail or a rat eating them.
Since this is kinda permanent wiring I would use keystone jacks on each end and short commercial cable to connect to the equipment. You can get keystones that do not require special tools and since you can do single wires at a time it is much easier for a beginner.
You could also buy a cheaper crimping tool and rj45 ends but it takes some practice to get all 8 wires perfect. Once you have the tool and can predictable crimp a end on it is a lot cheaper than using keystones but even people who make cables daily will make bad ones now and then.
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
Recently upgraded some of my desktop component and now, after soloing a clean install after having had some issues even recognizing the network drivers, the Ethernet connection just randomly drops and then comes back from time to time. I cannot roll back or update drivers as it has the most current Intel I-122v drivers and has not had any previous working drivers.

Besides replacing the Ethernet cable; what can I do?
Does this ethernet cable connect DIRECTLY to your router or to something else (powerline, wall plug, switch, etc ) ?
 

notasandwich

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Moving the PC is the simplest way to troubleshoot an ethernet problem. Or you could run a new long cable.
I tried doing this

Press the windows key and R key at the same time
Type CMD into the run dialog
Type ping 1.1.1.1 -t into the command prompt
Right click the command prompt in the task bar and open a second window (click on the command prompt).
Type ipconfig/all and grab your default gateway (like 192.168.1.1) and then type ping default gateway -t into the second prompt.
You should now have two windows pinging two separate locations (1.1.1.1 and 192.168.1.1 or similar).
Let it run while you're experiencing the issue.
If the ping fails, you have a network issue. If the default gateway doesn't fail you have an ISP issue. If the default gateway fails you have an Ethernet or computer issue.
If computer/local, replace the Ethernet cable. If ISP, call and complain to spectrum. Repeat until one of you dies of old age. Spoiler, it will be you.
If the ping doesn't fail you have a hardware problem.
and with both I received "general failure"
 
Recently upgraded some of my desktop component and now, after soloing a clean install after having had some issues even recognizing the network drivers, the Ethernet connection just randomly drops and then comes back from time to time. I cannot roll back or update drivers as it has the most current Intel I-122v drivers and has not had any previous working drivers.

Besides replacing the Ethernet cable; what can I do?
List full specs of your system.
Install chipset drivers, install lan drivers from motherboard support web site.

If ethernet adapter doesn't work, then get a new pcie ethernet adapter.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Just out of curiosity:

Is Reliability History and/or Event Viewer capturing any errors, warnings, or informational events that correspond with the signal drops?

Likewise, check the router's logs (if available and enabled).
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
I run the two ping commands as instructed by what I pasted. When the ethernet signal craps out, the only thing that shows up on both is either "general failure" or request timeout
When it works you to run an "ipconfig.exe /all" in a cmd.exe window -- Screen capture those results
Then when it isn't working do that again. See if there are any differences. If you aren't sure, post both screen captures.
 

notasandwich

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Just out of curiosity:

Is Reliability History and/or Event Viewer capturing any errors, warnings, or informational events that correspond with the signal drops?

Likewise, check the router's logs (if available and enabled).
It doesn't seem like reliability history or event view is picking up anything. Not sure how to check router logs
 

notasandwich

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You need to do the simple IPCONFIG /all command that was recommended. This will quickly show you the status.

This really seems like it is a bad ethernet cable.
Only difference I notice is that their is no information listed for the adaptor settings when it is down. It will say "media disconnected", the dns suffix, a description of the ethernet adapter, but no address info
 
Media disconnected is almost always a hardware issue. Luckily it tends to be a bad cable most times rather than the port in the machine being bad.

Your best option is to buy a new cable being careful to not buy fake. The key thing is the wire must be pure copper wire and even more important is the wire size must be 22-24. Massive numbers of people are buy that flat cable which has tiny wires that do not meet the standards to be a actual ethernet cable.

In your case if the wire itself is quality wire you might consider replacing the just the ends. It likely going to be more expensive than replacing the cable but it depends on how much effort it is to rerun the cable. The wires themselves seldom go bad unless they are physically damaged, like a nail or a rat eating them.
Since this is kinda permanent wiring I would use keystone jacks on each end and short commercial cable to connect to the equipment. You can get keystones that do not require special tools and since you can do single wires at a time it is much easier for a beginner.
You could also buy a cheaper crimping tool and rj45 ends but it takes some practice to get all 8 wires perfect. Once you have the tool and can predictable crimp a end on it is a lot cheaper than using keystones but even people who make cables daily will make bad ones now and then.
 

notasandwich

Distinguished
Jun 13, 2011
111
1
18,685
0
Media disconnected is almost always a hardware issue. Luckily it tends to be a bad cable most times rather than the port in the machine being bad.

Your best option is to buy a new cable being careful to not buy fake. The key thing is the wire must be pure copper wire and even more important is the wire size must be 22-24. Massive numbers of people are buy that flat cable which has tiny wires that do not meet the standards to be a actual ethernet cable.

In your case if the wire itself is quality wire you might consider replacing the just the ends. It likely going to be more expensive than replacing the cable but it depends on how much effort it is to rerun the cable. The wires themselves seldom go bad unless they are physically damaged, like a nail or a rat eating them.
Since this is kinda permanent wiring I would use keystone jacks on each end and short commercial cable to connect to the equipment. You can get keystones that do not require special tools and since you can do single wires at a time it is much easier for a beginner.
You could also buy a cheaper crimping tool and rj45 ends but it takes some practice to get all 8 wires perfect. Once you have the tool and can predictable crimp a end on it is a lot cheaper than using keystones but even people who make cables daily will make bad ones now and then.
I don't see how installing a keystone jack/wallplate would improve anything. Seems like it would just add to the amount of work
 
It is just one of the options. You mentioned the cable goes though 2 walls.

It all depends on how simple the cable is to replace. If it is easy then that is likely your best option.

If it is hard then you consider fixing the current cable. You have the choice of crimping on new ends or using keystones. All depends on which you prefer. The wire itself seldom is the problem it is almost always one of the connectors on the ends.
 

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