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[SOLVED] Ethernet Wiring

Apr 30, 2020
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Hi! My house is equipped with CAT5 Ethernet cables through the walls. I have about 1 gbps from the modem and running ethernet from there to the other side of the house lowers the speed down to 30 mbps. I would like to remove one CAT5 cable and replace it with CAT6A to get better speeds. I have no attic to see current wiring, and I don't really want to remove parts of the the wall. The only way I thought to do this is remove current jack and wall plates of the CAT5 cable, heavily tape the CAT6A cable to the CAT5, and pull the CAT5 wire until I see CAT6A cable on the other side. Obviously there are a bunch of problems with this, on a scale from 1 to 10 how bad is this idea? :tearsofjoy:

Is there another way to do this? Would my idea work? :tearsofjoy: Thanks in advance.
 
Thanks for your reply. I have CAT5, as of my knowledge CAT5E, as you said, can go to up to 1gbps, and CAT5 can go to 100mbps. Most internet usage is on the other side of the house and I cant move the modem.
You can also get gigabit running on cat5 because my parents house was wired before 5e was a standard and we have wired gigabit speeds.

There is something wrong with your wiring if you are only getting 30Mbs, especially when it should at least get 100Mbps. I would first diagnose why you're not even getting 100Mbps through it. More than likely is it not terminated correctly on either end (or both). My parents house has the same problem as several locations that only get 100Mbps wired have 3 inches of untwisted wire or some other jackass rookie wiring mistakes. I've come to the conclusion that most construction workers who wire cat5 in new homes are total morons. At least the wire you have is good, but you will probably need to reterminate them.
 

USAFRet

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Given non-crappy cable and connections, Cat6 will give no greater performance than Cat5e in a residence.

Cat5e is capable of gigabit speeds out to 100 meters. It would be an unusual residence that had a single cable that long.

Find the actual problem and fix that.
 
Apr 30, 2020
8
0
10
0
Given non-crappy cable and connections, Cat6 will give no greater performance than Cat5e in a residence.

Cat5e is capable of gigabit speeds out to 100 meters. It would be an unusual residence that had a single cable that long.

Find the actual problem and fix that.
Thanks for your reply. I have CAT5, as of my knowledge CAT5E, as you said, can go to up to 1gbps, and CAT5 can go to 100mbps. Most internet usage is on the other side of the house and I cant move the modem.
 
It is highly unlikely will just be able to tape a new wire to the old one and just pull it through. If it was run in conduit it might work but in many cases the wires are attached to the wood studs with staples. This is much more likely if they were put in when the house was built. Although not absolutely required by code in many areas electricians tend to always do it. Even if the wire was added after there are likely sharp bends and/or small holes that the wire with extra tape will be too small to go through.

Unless you get very very lucky your plan will likely not work as simple as you think
 
Reactions: SamirD
Thanks for your reply. I have CAT5, as of my knowledge CAT5E, as you said, can go to up to 1gbps, and CAT5 can go to 100mbps. Most internet usage is on the other side of the house and I cant move the modem.
You can also get gigabit running on cat5 because my parents house was wired before 5e was a standard and we have wired gigabit speeds.

There is something wrong with your wiring if you are only getting 30Mbs, especially when it should at least get 100Mbps. I would first diagnose why you're not even getting 100Mbps through it. More than likely is it not terminated correctly on either end (or both). My parents house has the same problem as several locations that only get 100Mbps wired have 3 inches of untwisted wire or some other jackass rookie wiring mistakes. I've come to the conclusion that most construction workers who wire cat5 in new homes are total morons. At least the wire you have is good, but you will probably need to reterminate them.
 

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