[SOLVED] Failing installation of Windows 10

Oct 1, 2019
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Hey guys,

I try to install Windows 10 via CD to a completely empty SSD drive from intenso, the 2.5'' SATA III HIGH Performance.
The short story: I get an error message saying "Windows cannot be installed to this disk. This computer's hardware may not support booting to this disk. Ensure that the disk's controller is enabled in the computer's BIOS menu."
The storage on the drive is not allocated yet, so it does not have a C:/ or any other drive letter.
I already tried to change the settings in the BIOS to IDE but that didn't change anything either.

The long story: There was previously Win10 installed on the computer and then a bug came, which downgraded the version to Win8.1, it is the computer of a friend and he has no idea on how this bug occured. So I created a Win10 CD, formatted every partition of the SSD and tried to install Win10, but got the error above.

Do you have any ideas how to fix this error?
Thanks in advance!
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
Yeah, the BIOS is set to AHCI.

I now tried to use the SSD in another PC and now I get another error message: "The request failed due to a fatal device hardware error." and Intel RST immediatly activated and says something like "Intel SMART event warning" but I seem unable to configure anything in Intel RST.
The SSD gets recognised, the size fits but I just cannot initialize it.
I would tell friend he needs a new SSD.
SMART - Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology; is built into all storage drives.
that fatal device hardware error, all the IO errors... yes, I would bury that ssd and maybe get friend to save up more before buying another ssd for a boot drive. I realise its good to budget buy but if the ssd only lasts a year or so, its not really saving you anything over one that might last 5 or more.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
could try creating partitions on the ssd before installing win 10
https://computingforgeeks.com/how-to-create-disk-partitions-in-windows-using-diskpart-command/

I can't find very much info on that ssd itself, they aren't well known outside Germany and from what I can tell they aren't the fastest/most reliable drives. Only reviews on web are also from sites trying to sell them.

was it this model? not sure I trust any data on a $22 SSD


I can't find any YT videos on it that I can understand. Blame me for not being multilingual I guess.

There was previously Win10 installed on the computer and then a bug came, which downgraded the version to Win8.1,
he has no idea on how this bug occured.
This doesn't seem possible. Unless friend did a factory reset, there shouldn't be any way for win 10 to roll back to 8.1.

Or does he have two drives in PC and second one had win 8.1 on it? If the ssd failed for some reason, PC could skip it and boot off 2nd drive, that had 8.1 on it already?
 
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Reactions: Mandark
Oct 1, 2019
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I can't find any YT videos on it that I can understand. Blame me for not being multilingual I guess.
I cannot blame you, you are trying to help me :D

was it this model? not sure I trust any data on a $22 SSD
Yeah, I'm from Germany and I'm trying to install Windows in German, so I cannot send any screenshots, but I will try to translate them as good as I can.
It's not the 2.5'' TOP, it's the 2.5'' HIGH for about 30$, but I don't wanna judge my friend for trying to save money...

could try creating partitions on the ssd before installing win 10
Thing is, the drive is getting recognised by Windows, but no commands can be run - DiskPart returns following error:
"DiskPart has encountered an error: The request could not be performed because of an I/O device error. See the System Event Log for more information."

This doesn't seem possible. Unless friend did a factory reset, there shouldn't be any way for win 10 to roll back to 8.1.

Or does he have two drives in PC and second one had win 8.1 on it? If the ssd failed for some reason, PC could skip it and boot off 2nd drive, that had 8.1 on it already?
He told me he upgraded from Win8.1 to Win10 but now somehow the old Windows 8.1 was booted, even showing drives in the explorer that were not connected to the PC.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
Was windows on the ssd before your attempted install?
Does friend have 2 drives in PC?

There are a number of possible causes for I/O device error and some are listed here:

  • There is something wrong with device connection, such as bad cables, loose connection, USB ports insufficient power supply.
  • The hardware is using an incompatible transfer mode or improper interface.
  • The CD or DVD disk you are accessing is damaged or dirty.
  • The storage device you are trying to use is damaged or defective. When you attempt to access data from a bad area, the error will appear.
  • Operating system is trying to use a transfer mode which cannot be used by the device.
https://www.eassos.com/how-to/fix-diskpart-has-encountered-an-error.php#DiskPart_has_encountered_an_I/O_device_error
 
Oct 1, 2019
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It was on the SSD before, yes. But I deleted all partitions and formatted everything, blame me if that was wrong, I now some things about programming but never installed Windows on a completly clean drive.
He had 2 drives in the PC but now the second HDD is disconnected, there is data on it. Is it useful to try to install Windows on the HDD and after that installing it on the SSD?
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
Could be the CD you are using, maybe try making a Installer on USB and see if you get same errors.

It was on the SSD before, yes. But I deleted all partitions and formatted everything, blame me if that was wrong, I now some things about programming but never installed Windows on a completely clean drive.
Wiping drive shouldn't cause this. It is part of the process of a clean install anyway.

I would leave hdd as is if it is where all his data is. Don't want to lose everything.
Installing it on hdd would only tell us if its the ssd causing the errors. its not a long term solution.

can you test ssd in another PC? Need to make sure it is okay before trying to figure out error.

As link above shows, it can be caused by cables as well.
 
Oct 1, 2019
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He has a backup of the HDD, there is nothing to lose for him, I already tried different cables, next thing would be to switch SATA slots on the motherboard, but the motherboard is hard to reach.
I'll try to connect the SSD to another PC.

If I try to create a now partition in the Windows dialog when choosing where to install Windows I get the error "New partition could not be created [Error: 0x8007045d]"
 
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Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
I/O Device errors such as Error 0x8007045d, 0x9007045d usually occurs when you are trying to transfer files from one storage medium to another, opening a storage device, or burning a disc. When this error occurs, in most cases, it means Windows is attempting to use a transfer mode that is not available or compatible to or from a storage device. A faulty hardware, wrong connection or configuration can also cause this error.

Unfortunately, in most cases Error 0x8007045d, 0x9007045d points to the disk drive being damaged. When you see this error, there are 99.9% chances that it is the disk that has gone bad.
https://appuals.com/how-to-fix-device-io-error-0x8007045d-or-0x9007045d/

unless its the installer you are using, it looks like your friend needs to get a new ssd.

testing it to be sure is a good idea.

See if hdd has the same problems
 
Oct 1, 2019
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I'm trying to install via CD because every time I try to install the Windows installer to a USB-Stick the installation fails.
The HDD has a different problem: "Windows cannot be installed to this disk. The selected disk is of the GPT partition style."
But the SSD worked untill I formatted it, Windows 8.1 was running on it - could a BIOS Update solve anything?
 
Oct 1, 2019
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Installation on the HDD looks sucessful (although the BIOS was kind of crazy, I had to disconnect the SSD to set the HDD as second Boot option after the disk), I can say more when the installation is done completely.

Yeah, specs, good question, my friend forgot what specs he has.
I got the motherboard by installing Ubuntu on a CD and running it and looked up there what a motherboard is installed, it's a
Asus P8H61-I
The graphic card is a
Nvidia GeForce GTX 760Ti

Processor no idea, it's an Intel i7, but I don't know which one exactly.
I can say that once the installation on the HDD is done.
 
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Oct 1, 2019
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The specs are:
Motherboard: Asus P8H61-I
Graphic card: Nvidia GeForce GTX 760Ti
Processor: Intel Core i7-3770 @ 3.40GHz (no K)
RAM: 8GB

The Windows installation on the HDD works without any problems, I will now try to add the SSD again.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
I should have told you to unplug ssd when installing on hdd.

Is there any delay in booting off hdd that can't be written off as just a slow hdd. when ssd is attached? Just wondering how it went after the install?

Does ssd show up in disk management? Is it showing as RAW?
 
Oct 1, 2019
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There is no delay when booting from the HDD when the SSD is attached.
Yes, the SSD shows up in disk managment, but I cannot create a partition, I get the same I/O Error, just this time in an Windows box.

If you have any other idea that could work (I didn't do the BIOS Update, I guess my PC just hates USB-Sticks and I fail trying to copy the Update to the Stick and I don't want to have a corrupt BIOS in the PC) I'm happy to hear it.

Otherwise I will just tell my friend that he'll need to get a new SSD.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
Try ssd drive in another PC, if you cannot format it in another one as well, he needs a new ssd.

Try running HD Sentinel Trial on the ssd - https://www.hdsentinel.com/hard_disk_sentinel_trial.php
run any scans you can on the disk tab.

Is bios set to AHCI now? I only ask as you said you swapped them before. It shouldn't change formatting, just speed.

Not sure why your PC hates USB sticks. not entirely sure how you would fix that. USB drivers built into windows unless you using Asmedia slots (some boards have 2 chips that run USB)
 
Oct 1, 2019
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Yeah, the BIOS is set to AHCI.

I now tried to use the SSD in another PC and now I get another error message: "The request failed due to a fatal device hardware error." and Intel RST immediatly activated and says something like "Intel SMART event warning" but I seem unable to configure anything in Intel RST.
The SSD gets recognised, the size fits but I just cannot initialize it.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
Yeah, the BIOS is set to AHCI.

I now tried to use the SSD in another PC and now I get another error message: "The request failed due to a fatal device hardware error." and Intel RST immediatly activated and says something like "Intel SMART event warning" but I seem unable to configure anything in Intel RST.
The SSD gets recognised, the size fits but I just cannot initialize it.
I would tell friend he needs a new SSD.
SMART - Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology; is built into all storage drives.
that fatal device hardware error, all the IO errors... yes, I would bury that ssd and maybe get friend to save up more before buying another ssd for a boot drive. I realise its good to budget buy but if the ssd only lasts a year or so, its not really saving you anything over one that might last 5 or more.
 
Oct 1, 2019
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I gave my friend the PC back and said, that he should get a new SSD - thank you for your help, although I couldn't fix the SSD.

He just told me he used CCleaner, that could be the reason why Windows was crazy, maybe it deleted a crucial Registry-entry.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
i don't use registry cleaners like that, you just don't need them. And they can do more damage than good.

You can't fix a broken ssd. It is just how it is. Same with hdd, once they dead you just have to get a new one.
 

britechguy

Commendable
Jul 2, 2019
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To reinforce @Colif's point, a repeat of something I posted just yesterday on this very forum:

Registry cleaners/optimizers are the proverbial snake oil at best, and can create serious problems in many instances.

When Microsoft, the entity that created and maintains all versions of Windows, specifically advises against the use of registry cleaners/optimizers, it's advice worth heeding:

Microsoft support policy for the use of registry cleaning utilities
 

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