Discussion First Build! Need some help with parts.

mxnty

Great
Mar 4, 2021
147
21
85
0
Hey!
I’m planning to build my very first PC in November. I’ve started planning and would like recommendations and help with components. I’m going to be playing somewhat intensive games like Fortnite, Rocket League (not really), etc. I’ve made a decent build idea but have some questions:
I can add prices if needed, just ask!

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 5600X
GPU: ASUS TUF Gaming RTX 3080; which 3080 is best for up to $750?
MOBO: ASUS ROG Strix X570-E; is this mobo WiFi integrated?; X570 or b550?; general recommendations.
RAM: Corsair DDR4 32 GB (2x16GB) 3200 MHz; is this good??
PSU: Corsair RMx 850W 80+ Gold; is 850W enough for this and some RGB??
CPU Cooling: NZXT Kraken X73 RGB; wondering if it’s a good AIO?
Case: NZXT H710i; is this a lot or just enough space? Thinking which between this and H510 Elite so please help.

Hoping to get around 240ish FPS as I get 160 rn on my old PC with a GTX 1080 (I think) and a 60 Hz monitor. Any building tips would be greatly appreciated and I’m excited to enter the world of building PCs!
P.S. PCPartsPicker build: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/kCn8wz
 
Last edited:
It is entirely premature to be making such decisions now when the build time frame is in November.
By then, rocket lake processors will be out and who knows what ryzen will bring.

The one thing you could do now is to buy your monitor.
You will get a better idea of what it takes to run it.

If you were to build today, you would have a hard time finding a 5600x or a 3080, and certainly nowhere near msrp. Hopefully, that will have changed by November.

On your current list, ryzen depends on fast ram for performance. 3200 speed is not the best.
Past that, not all ram kits will work.
Verify compatibility with the Motherboard ram QVL list.

850W is plenty for any modern graphics card.
This chart is good for sizing a psu:
http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm

It is silly to me to pay as much for an aio cooler as the cpu.
Unless you are planning on record seeking overclocks, a good twin tower air cooler will do the job.
A air cooler will be quieter, cheaper, easier to install, be more reliable, last forever(aio will accumulate air in time and need to be replaced)
And... while uncommon, air will never leak, causing disastrous problems.

Here is my canned text for my build process:
MY build process:

Before anything, while waiting for your parts to be delivered, download
and read, cover to cover your case and motherboard manual.
Buy a #2 magnetic tip philips screwdriver.
I find it handy to buy a power switch like this for testing.
https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16812119009?Description=power switch&cm_re=power_switch-_-12-119-009-_-Product&quicklink=true
1. I assemble the critical parts outside of the case.
That lets me test them for functionality easily.
A wood table or cardboard is fine.
2. Plug in only the necessary parts at first. Ram, cpu, cooler, psu.
Do not force anything. Parts fit only one way.
Attach a monitor to the integrated motherboard adapter if you have one, otherwise to the graphics card.
  1. If your motherboard does not have a PWR button, momentarily touch the two pwr front panel pins with a flat blade screwdriver.
  2. Repeatedly hit F2 or DEL, and that should get you into the bios display.
  3. Boot from a cd or usb stick with memtest86 on it. memtest will exercise your ram and cpu functionality.
  4. Install windows.
  5. Install the motherboard cd drivers. Particularly the lan drivers so you can access the internet.
Do not select the easy install option, or you will get a bunch of utilities and trialware that you don't want. Drivers only.
  1. Connect to the internet and install an antivirus program. Microsoft defender is free, easy, and unobtrusive.
  2. Install your graphics card and driver if you tested with integrated graphics.
You will need to remove the graphics card later to install your motherboard in the case.
As a tip when screwing the motherboard into the posts, give the screw a small counterclockwise turn until you feel a click.
That lets you know that the screw will engage properly.
Make a note of how the graphics card latches into the pcie slot.
The mechanism will be hidden under the card and may be difficult to work if you have not previously checked how.
  1. Update windows to currency.
  2. Only now do I take apart what I need to and install it in the case.
  3. Now is the time to reinstall your graphics card.
 

Phaaze88

Polypheme
Ambassador
You can't see more than what the monitor displays, plus your current cpu + ram + GTX 1080 far exceeds what the current monitor can show.
Damn the input lag argument, this is just throwing money away.

Get a monitor that can display most of the frames you're targeting - put everything on hold, or leave it alone. It's a bad time for changing hardware; it's harder to get, many items are more expensive than usual.
There's limits to what frame sync technology can do before you're in screen tearing hell and are forced to enable V-sync or Fast sync.


Bottom line: Replace the monitor or leave the PC alone until you are ready to do so.
 
Reactions: kurdtnz

mxnty

Great
Mar 4, 2021
147
21
85
0
I have heard of that, unsure what V-sync is though. Surprisingly, I do get a solid 160FPS on the said monitor with no input lag at all. The ping is 27ms but that's not dependant on the monitor. Are there any decent 120 or 144Hz monitors for a decent amount? around $150 max if possible? I'm not on a budget per se but I'm trying to save some money. If you could explain what could happen if the PC is built and connected to a 60Hz monitor, that'd be great. I currently use an Acer Predator G3-710 with a GTX 1080 and a 7th Gen Intel CPU.
 

Phaaze88

Polypheme
Ambassador
Negative. It is still 60fps. It can't display more than what it's capable of. Simple physics. It doesn't magically overclock itself or anything. You've been playing at 60fps this entire time.
The fps software you're using is showing what you could get over the monitor's refresh rate; it's theoretical frame rate.
-1000fps in Minecraft? Nope, still 60.
-500fps in CS:GO? Nope, still 60.
And so on.

V-sync in a nutshell: Gpu frame rate is limited to the refresh rate of the monitor. This helps to avoid screen tearing that is caused by excessive frames over the monitor's refresh.
It introduces latency and can increase input lag, but it also can cause stuttering if frame rate falls below the monitor's refresh rate.

There's also Fast Sync, which works closely to V-sync off. It avoids tearing by dropping all frames over the monitor's refresh. None of the input lag that comes with V-sync on.


Monitor: You're down on your luck finding one around that price AND that has an in-depth review available - no, slideshows don't count. Bad time to want to change hardware, as I said earlier.
I check Tom's and Hardware Unboxed for monitor reviews - there's just so many models out there that there's just no way to cover them all.
Acer XFA240: ~200USD
AOC 24G2: ~180, but they recently did some 'under the nose' crap and changed out the parts on their more recent models, which do perform worse, and it's just a dick move.
Msi Optix G242: ~190
Pixio PX248 Prime: It WAS ~180...
At least for now, the 4 monitor's in this link appear to be cheapest available, only 2(Pixio and TUF VG24VQ) appear to have reviews, and they're both 'meh'.


I don't understand the thing about saving money. If you just get a new monitor Vs that list of parts up there, you will have saved a lot.
You don't really need to change anything else because it is all holding up well. At least do yourself the favor of being able to have most of the theoretical fps on display.
 
Reactions: Why_Me and kurdtnz
It is entirely premature to be making such decisions now when the build time frame is in November.
By then, rocket lake processors will be out and who knows what ryzen will bring.

The one thing you could do now is to buy your monitor.
You will get a better idea of what it takes to run it.

If you were to build today, you would have a hard time finding a 5600x or a 3080, and certainly nowhere near msrp. Hopefully, that will have changed by November.

On your current list, ryzen depends on fast ram for performance. 3200 speed is not the best.
Past that, not all ram kits will work.
Verify compatibility with the Motherboard ram QVL list.

850W is plenty for any modern graphics card.
This chart is good for sizing a psu:
http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm

It is silly to me to pay as much for an aio cooler as the cpu.
Unless you are planning on record seeking overclocks, a good twin tower air cooler will do the job.
A air cooler will be quieter, cheaper, easier to install, be more reliable, last forever(aio will accumulate air in time and need to be replaced)
And... while uncommon, air will never leak, causing disastrous problems.

Here is my canned text for my build process:
MY build process:

Before anything, while waiting for your parts to be delivered, download
and read, cover to cover your case and motherboard manual.
Buy a #2 magnetic tip philips screwdriver.
I find it handy to buy a power switch like this for testing.
https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16812119009?Description=power switch&cm_re=power_switch-_-12-119-009-_-Product&quicklink=true
1. I assemble the critical parts outside of the case.
That lets me test them for functionality easily.
A wood table or cardboard is fine.
2. Plug in only the necessary parts at first. Ram, cpu, cooler, psu.
Do not force anything. Parts fit only one way.
Attach a monitor to the integrated motherboard adapter if you have one, otherwise to the graphics card.
  1. If your motherboard does not have a PWR button, momentarily touch the two pwr front panel pins with a flat blade screwdriver.
  2. Repeatedly hit F2 or DEL, and that should get you into the bios display.
  3. Boot from a cd or usb stick with memtest86 on it. memtest will exercise your ram and cpu functionality.
  4. Install windows.
  5. Install the motherboard cd drivers. Particularly the lan drivers so you can access the internet.
Do not select the easy install option, or you will get a bunch of utilities and trialware that you don't want. Drivers only.
  1. Connect to the internet and install an antivirus program. Microsoft defender is free, easy, and unobtrusive.
  2. Install your graphics card and driver if you tested with integrated graphics.
You will need to remove the graphics card later to install your motherboard in the case.
As a tip when screwing the motherboard into the posts, give the screw a small counterclockwise turn until you feel a click.
That lets you know that the screw will engage properly.
Make a note of how the graphics card latches into the pcie slot.
The mechanism will be hidden under the card and may be difficult to work if you have not previously checked how.
  1. Update windows to currency.
  2. Only now do I take apart what I need to and install it in the case.
  3. Now is the time to reinstall your graphics card.
 

mxnty

Great
Mar 4, 2021
147
21
85
0
I do see your point about being too early but I just wanted to formulate a plan and let it be for later, just so I don't mess up. I don't know how Rocket Lake will perform and to be honest, I might stick with AMD. I will make sure to follow that process. But as you said, time will pass, and things might change. Thank you for the help.
 

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