Question Fixing current/edp limit throttling with AVX offset?

Sep 23, 2020
4
1
15
0
I have recently gotten into overclocking, attempting to overclock my i7-9700k to 5.0Ghz. I did some benchmarking using Cinebench R15 to track my performance gains. I noticed that when I ran the test concurrently, the first 2 tests will run just fine on the overclocked frequency, but all subsequent tests will seemingly reduce the clock speed down to around 4.6 Ghz (oddly enough, my benchmark score still remained the same). The same thing happened when running an Aida 64 stress test, with the clock speeds dropping after about 2 minutes in.

Naturally, I thought this pointed to a VRM issue, but because my motherboard doesn't have an actual VRM temperature sensor, there was no way to tell. So, I tried downloading Intel's XTU software, and upon running a normal CPU software, everything seemed fine. However, when I ran a test with AVX instructions, it told me that it was the current/EDP limit that was throttling my CPU, and not my VRMs.

I scoured all over the web for a remedy, trying to increase my the CPU current capability along with the long/short package power limit and the package power time window on my BIOS, but neither did solve the problem. In fact, the latter two actually crashed my system. After trying an AVX offset of 2, was I finally rid of the problem. Now, the stress tests with AVX just runs at 4.8Ghz instead of fluctuating all over the place.

So my question is, or rather, are: are there any other solutions to fix a current/EDP limit throttling other than an AVX offset? Also, will an AVX offset negatively impact performance in games?

My full specs are as below:
CPU: Intel Core i7-9700k OC@5.0Ghz
CPU Cooler: NZXT Kraken x63
RAM: 2x16GB Corsair Vengeance RGB PRO DDR4 3200mhz CL16
MOBO: Asus Prime z370A-II
GPU: Zotac GTX 1060 Mini (6gb)
PSU: Cooler master 750W MWE Gold (Full modular)

Thanks in advance.
 
Last edited:
So my question is, or rather, are: are there any other solutions to fix a current/EDP limit throttling other than an AVX offset? Also, will an AVX offset negatively impact performance in games?
The current limit is what regulates how much vcore your CPU gets, too much vcore can fry your CPU so leave well enough alone.
Run coretemp or something while running something that hits the current limitation and check the VID in coretemp and tell us.1.5 is the absolute maximum that is already pretty bad for the longevity of the CPU it should be at 1.4 and below.
AVX is not being used by games,there might be one or two that use it and almost always the GPU will be the one that will limit you before anything the CPU does.
This also goes for your overclock in general, a 1060 is not fast enough to show any difference in games.
 
Reactions: EndeligGnist
Sep 23, 2020
4
1
15
0
The current limit is what regulates how much vcore your CPU gets, too much vcore can fry your CPU so leave well enough alone.
Run coretemp or something while running something that hits the current limitation and check the VID in coretemp and tell us.1.5 is the absolute maximum that is already pretty bad for the longevity of the CPU it should be at 1.4 and below.
AVX is not being used by games,there might be one or two that use it and almost always the GPU will be the one that will limit you before anything the CPU does.
This also goes for your overclock in general, a 1060 is not fast enough to show any difference in games.
I always use Aida 64 as a means to know if my overclock is stable or not. So far, my system is stable, but my CPU just downclocks itself when running stress tests with AVX instructions. I'll try upping the vcore. Also, I'm intending on upgrading my 1060 with a 3080 in the future, hence the overclock.

Thanks.
 
I always use Aida 64 as a means to know if my overclock is stable or not. So far, my system is stable, but my CPU just downclocks itself when running stress tests with AVX instructions. I'll try upping the vcore. Also, I'm intending on upgrading my 1060 with a 3080 in the future, hence the overclock.

Thanks.
It's expected behavior to downclock on avx instructions because they use a lot more processing power, don't worry about avx if you are just gaming.
Do not increase the vcore too much, in fact personally I would try to reduce it as much as possible, high vcore is not good for the CPU.
Also get the 3080 first look how it performs and then consider overclocking.
 
Reactions: CompuTronix

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
The current limit is what regulates how much vcore your CPU gets, too much vcore can fry your CPU so leave well enough alone.
Run coretermp ... while running something that hits the current limitation and check the VID in coretemp and tell us ...
Respectfully, in electronics, the term "Current" is synonymous with "Amperage" or "Amps", which is not directly related to Core voltage and Voltage IDentificaion (VID). In Direct Current (DC), Amps x Volts = Watts.

Core Voltage vs. VID


CT :sol:
 
Sep 23, 2020
4
1
15
0
It's expected behavior to downclock on avx instructions because they use a lot more processing power, don't worry about avx if you are just gaming.
Do not increase the vcore too much, in fact personally I would try to reduce it as much as possible, high vcore is not good for the CPU.
Also get the 3080 first look how it performs and then consider overclocking.
I just found out what the problem is. I maxed out my CPU core/cache current limit, and that seemed to solve the current/EDP current limit throttling.

However, after running my stress tests, a new problem presented itself: power limit throttling. So this time I went back into the BIOS to max out the package power limit and time window, and that finally solved the problem. I can run consecutive runs of Cinebench 15 without my CPU down clocking itself. Temperatures seem to be a couple degrees higher under load, but not close to throttling.
 
Reactions: Tabonie
Nov 2, 2020
1
0
10
0
I just found out what the problem is. I maxed out my CPU core/cache current limit, and that seemed to solve the current/EDP current limit throttling.

However, after running my stress tests, a new problem presented itself: power limit throttling. So this time I went back into the BIOS to max out the package power limit and time window, and that finally solved the problem. I can run consecutive runs of Cinebench 15 without my CPU down clocking itself. Temperatures seem to be a couple degrees higher under load, but not close to throttling.
Hi, I have the exact same problem without overclock ... Please could you explain to me exactly what you touched (Bios or XTU) to solve the problem.
Thanks!!!
 
Sep 23, 2020
4
1
15
0
Hi, I have the exact same problem without overclock ... Please could you explain to me exactly what you touched (Bios or XTU) to solve the problem.
Thanks!!!
Sorry for the late reply.

I simply maxed out my CPU core/cache current limit and my package power limit/time window. All of these can be found in the BIOS settings. That should solve your problem.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY