Ford ranger/american car reliability

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Jmi20

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First, I don’t mean to offend anybody or anything. Please don’t think of this in a bad way.

Many years ago my dad was supposed to gift me with my first car, he gave me a budget and told me to look. I wanted a 2002 ford laser (called lynx here in southeast asia), specifically a special edition one with modified front fascia, 2.0 inline 4 with a 5 speed manual and was waaaay below the budget he gave me at the time.

He would not allow it, he said he won’t take an american car even if somebody paid him. We had a heated argument about it and weren’t in talking terms for a month, we never talked about cars again. Now that i think about it he never did gift me a first car.

But now, im thinking of buying a used, american, car. Specifically a 2016-17 ford ranger.

Ive always had a liking for american cars (I’d dreamed of having a corvette, drooled over the ford explorer back in 2011) but a lot of people i know only have bad things to say about american cars. some giving ford the acronym Found On the Road Dead and others. I like to keep an open mind and given that those people don’t even currently have any fords or other american cars, I can’t give anyone credibility for critiquing something they don’t even have, or not anymore i dunno.

so, um. hows reliability? I don’t mind having something that needs a little bit more “caressing” so long as i know what im getting into. Any clues why theres such stigma? Were they really that bad before? How about now? Is it worth any risk?

seems very unfair to label a car company, or car companies as garbage because of what might have been a past mistake… look at amd for instance, their older cpus aren’t very good but ryzen is sort of like redemption for them…

would appreciate any input!
 

Jmi20

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I really don’t think ford is that bad… my aunt has a ford oven toaster, i dont know if its the same company ford (logo is) but it’s been with her for many years, my panasonic broke down twice in 3 years already… but I’d appreciate any objective input.
 
I’m in the UK and I’ve had various brands of cars. Ford are no less reliable than any other brand, I’ve probably had less problems with my Ford’s. My Mazda gave me the most issues. Also Ford make many parts for other brands, there is a Ford factory not that far from me and they build engines that also go to Jaguar and Land Rover. My sister in law who works there said they even do some parts for McLaren.

My dad always drove Fords because spares were cheap. I really only remember him doing basic maintenance such as brakes and oil.

However all manufacturers have bad models that are best avoided, always do your research. I would never buy a diesel if you only do short journeys and don’t buy these small 3 cylinder engine cars if you plan on high mileage.
 
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Aeacus

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so, um. hows reliability?
If you take care of your car, properly, it will last for decades, regardless the make and model.

Also, where you live (what part of the world), does have an impact on your car reliability.

For example;
Here in Europe (where i live), everyone have to pass technical inspection if they want to keep using the car. Car age up to 10 years - inspection after each 2 years, car age more than 10 years - inspection every year. If you do not pass the inspection (which you have to pay for), you need to go and get the issues fixed (within 30 days). Then, go and get the 2nd inspection (for free). If you pass, you can legally drive you car on public roads again. If you don't pass, you have to fix your car, or take a risk of very hefty fine + car confiscation if cops pull you over.

In USA, the technical inspection isn't mandatory. Instead, it's a suggestion. And due to that, you can see all kinds of wrecks driving along the roads. And since Ford is mainly in USA, it gets the bad reliability rep thanks to the non-mandatory technical inspection at that side of the pond.

Specifically a 2016-17 ford ranger.
Two things about that car:
1 - Huge dimensions, even for Europe's standards. This means that maneuvering with it is an hassle, especially in southeast Asia, where you're at (narrow roads, tight turns). It's something to keep in mind. In USA, with wide roads, this isn't an issue.
2 - Gas guzzler. Big engine = huge fuel consumption. Fuel prices tend to be higher outside of USA, so you may not be able to keep it running, unless you're rich and doesn't care about expenses.

Car review: https://www.caradvice.com.au/374762/2016-ford-ranger-review/

my dad was supposed to gift me with my first car
That's a strange concept i haven't never quite understood. Why your parents should gift you a car? If you want a car, earn money and buy it yourself. Just like with all other things in adulthood.

In any event, here's some of my own personal experience when it comes to car reliability;

1st car that i owned, some 20+ years ago, was '88 Honda Accord. Bought it with my own money (no gift) and while i liked it, i didn't pay much attention to keeping it serviced well and went only in service when there was dire need. (Teens, right? 😆 ) And in the end, i learned my lesson when transmission blew and i had to sell it for spare parts. If i would've kept the service going well, i could've avoided that.

But with lesson learned, i'm not that negligent anymore. Now, i have '08 Subaru Forester and i'm keeping it well serviced. So far, everything works like a charm and i have 0 issues with my car. :) Sure, it does cost me more money to keep servicing it but if you take care of it, it will serve you well. Same goes with PCs as well.

Oh, i've driven with Fords as well, as rental cars. And at least these Ford models sold in Europe, i haven't had any issues with. Though, i haven't driven the "real" American Ford and can't comment on that.
 

USAFRet

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In USA, the technical inspection isn't mandatory. Instead, it's a suggestion.
Thats completely state specific.

Virginia has a comprehensive equipment inspection. Yearly, after the first or second year.
Other states just have an emissions check.
Some states have both.
Some states have neither.
 

USAFRet

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My last 3 and current trucks have been Fords.

2000 F-150, destroyed by a texting teenager. 230,000 miles.
1996 Ranger, sent to the scrap heap at 345,000 miles. I had bought it for $1200 as an interim after the F-150 crash.
1997 F-150, current vehicle. 250,000 miles and still running , after I fix whatever little fault exists in the electrical system.
 

Jmi20

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I’m in the UK and I’ve had various brands of cars. Ford are no less reliable than any other brand, I’ve probably had less problems with my Ford’s. My Mazda gave me the most issues. Also Ford make many parts for other brands, there is a Ford factory not that far from me and they build engines that also go to Jaguar and Land Rover. My sister in law who works there said they even do some parts for McLaren.

My dad always drove Fords because spares were cheap. I really only remember him doing basic maintenance such as brakes.

However all manufacturers have bad models that are best avoided, always do your research. I would never buy a diesel if you only do short journeys and don’t buy these small 3 cylinder engine cars if you plan on high mileage.
Thats good to hear. I don’t mind doing basic maintenance like oil, tires, brakes. I could tolerate a bit more so long as its not too major.

I believe the only ford rangers here are diesel. Im planning on mixed city and highway usage.
 
Thats good to hear. I don’t mind doing basic maintenance like oil, tires, brakes. I could tolerate a bit more so long as its not too major.

I believe the only ford rangers here are diesel. Im planning on mixed city and highway usage.
As long as you are doing some highway driving you are ok. Modern diesels need a good run of good speed and duration to go through their exhaust clearing process where they burn off excess particles in the DPF. If you don’t do this the filter blocks and it’s expensive to get cleaned or replaced. You can see when it does the cleaning process as the MPG drops massively as it’s pumping additional fuel through the system to burn off the particles and this can go on for many miles before it finishes.
 
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USAFRet

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Mandatory vehicle inspections should be on federal level and apply to all states equally. That's how things are here in Europe. Keeps the wrecks off the road and traffic a lot safer. :)
Well..that goes into a whole big political about what the fed should control and what the states should control.
Which we will NOT get into here.
 

Jmi20

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If you take care of your car, properly, it will last for decades, regardless the make and model.

Also, where you live (what part of the world), does have an impact on your car reliability.

For example;
Here in Europe (where i live), everyone have to pass technical inspection if they want to keep using the car. Car age up to 10 years - inspection after each 2 years, car age more than 10 years - inspection every year. If you do not pass the inspection (which you have to pay for), you need to go and get the issues fixed (within 30 days). Then, go and get the 2nd inspection (for free). If you pass, you can legally drive you car on public roads again. If you don't pass, you have to fix your car, or take a risk of very hefty fine + car confiscation if cops pull you over.

In USA, the technical inspection isn't mandatory. Instead, it's a suggestion. And due to that, you can see all kinds of wrecks driving along the roads. And since Ford is mainly in USA, it gets the bad reliability rep thanks to the non-mandatory technical inspection at that side of the pond.



Two things about that car:
1 - Huge dimensions, even for Europe's standards. This means that maneuvering with it is an hassle, especially in southeast Asia, where you're at (narrow roads, tight turns). It's something to keep in mind. In USA, with wide roads, this isn't an issue.
2 - Gas guzzler. Big engine = huge fuel consumption. Fuel prices tend to be higher outside of USA, so you may not be able to keep it running, unless you're rich and doesn't care about expenses.

Car review: https://www.caradvice.com.au/374762/2016-ford-ranger-review/



That's a strange concept i haven't never quite understood. Why your parents should gift you a car? If you want a car, earn money and buy it yourself. Just like with all other things in adulthood.

In any event, here's some of my own personal experience when it comes to car reliability;

1st car that i owned, some 20+ years ago, was '88 Honda Accord. Bought it with my own money (no gift) and while i liked it, i didn't pay much attention to keeping it serviced well and went only in service when there was dire need. (Teens, right? 😆 ) And in the end, i learned my lesson when transmission blew and i had to sell it for spare parts. If i would've kept the service going well, i could've avoided that.

But with lesson learned, i'm not that negligent anymore. Now, i have '08 Subaru Forester and i'm keeping it well serviced. So far, everything works like a charm and i have 0 issues with my car. :) Sure, it does cost me more money to keep servicing it but if you take care of it, it will serve you well. Same goes with PCs as well.

Oh, i've driven with Fords as well, as rental cars. And at least these Ford models sold in Europe, i haven't had any issues with. Though, i haven't driven the "real" American Ford and can't comment on that.
i think i take care of my cars well. I follow the maintenance schedule in the manual and have other parts inspected by a local mechanic every year.

there is basic inspection here but limited only to tires, emissions, brakes…

Pickup trucks are actually the top selling new vehicles here. i stay in an area where the roads aren’t very congested, and try to avoid tight spaces and heavy traffic. The engine is also a diesel, its a lot cheaper than gasoline here.

i also dont understand the concept of gifting cars myself. It was when i graduated college and got fairly good grades. I wont do it if i have a kid hehe.

must be because i kept “stealing” my parents cars at the time, but i never did anything dumb or reckless. Never scratched or bumped or anything. I also never demanded nor expected anything of the sort, it just came out of the blue.
 

Jmi20

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My last 3 and current trucks have been Fords.

2000 F-150, destroyed by a texting teenager. 230,000 miles.
1996 Ranger, sent to the scrap heap at 345,000 miles. I had bought it for $1200 as an interim after the F-150 crash.
1997 F-150, current vehicle. 250,000 miles and still running , after I fix whatever little fault exists in the electrical system.
i see a lot of f-150s for extra cheap here. The 1997 model is another one i would like to have. But unfortunately there doesn’t seem to be much parts availability here. Maybe at inflated prices…

the ranger has a lot of parts available and mechanics who know how to work with it here. So im guessing its a good sign.

it seems from your experience fords actually do last. Must have been some previous bad experiences by older people here. I remember nissan had some sort of an issue here before regarding build quality, but didn’t hear as much bad things about it as ford so i assume it wasn’t as bad. Bought a sentra before and didn’t have any major problem. So i think its unfair to not give ford any chance.
 

USAFRet

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If you take care of it properly, almost any vehicle will 'last'.
Of course, as with any complex device, there is a small percentage that will fail early and prominently.

Those are the ones you hear about.
 
Must have been some previous bad experiences by older people here.
I have heard that some of the Fords from the 70’s & 80’s were known for bad rusting but so were other brands. I’ve never owned a Ford built in this period so cannot say how true that is.

I know someone who owns a Ford Model T that is about 100 years old. He gets it out a few times a year and I even drove it once on a private road, the controls are completely different to modern cars. You can’t really take anything from this but it shows how long a well looked after car can last.
 

USAFRet

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I have heard that some of the Fords from the 70’s & 80’s were known for bad rusting but so were other brands. I’ve never owned a Ford built in this period so cannot say how true that is.
I grew up in Upstate NY. In that period you mention, approx 2% of ALL the road salt in the USA ended up on our counties roads.
Rust City.

Many many vehicles would start to show rust around the wheelwells after 2-3 years.

Went back up there a couple of weeks ago for vacation.
That still happens. Across ALL brands. Not Ford specific.
Saw a reasonably recent Dodge RAM pickup. Rust.
Chevy Silverado, Rust.
etc, etc....
 
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Jmi20

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If you take care of it properly, almost any vehicle will 'last'.
Of course, as with any complex device, there is a small percentage that will fail early and prominently.

Those are the ones you hear about.
i see your point. I think negativity gets more publicity. Besides, a lot of the people i asked were either shop owners or mechanics. Obviously their opinions won’t be as optimistic, all they see are broken cars. Huh.
 

Jmi20

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I have heard that some of the Fords from the 70’s & 80’s were known for bad rusting but so were other brands. I’ve never owned a Ford built in this period so cannot say how true that is.

I know someone who owns a Ford Model T that is about 100 years old. He gets it out a few times a year and I even drove it once on a private road, the controls are completely different to modern cars. You can’t really take anything from this but it shows how long a well looked after car can last.
oh i see. This might be the case. I never see any old 70s and 80s fords or american cars out here but see older classics, and 90s and newer. Now that i think about it, a vast number of cars from that generation were either mitsubishi or mercedes benz…

edit: never mind this post. Reliability issues dont seem to be the case. Oil crisis, Bad economy and a dictatorship at the time seems to have been why there arent much.
 
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USAFRet

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oh i see. This might be the case. I never see any old 70s and 80s fords or american cars out here but see older classics, and 90s and newer. Now that i think about it, a vast number of cars from that generation were either mitsubishi or mercedes benz…
The 70s and 80s wasn't a good time for Detroit iron.

But....that was also 40-50 years ago. Not many cars that old of ANY make are still cruising around.
 
I grew up in Upstate NY. In that period you mention, approx 2% of ALL the road salt in the USA ended up on our counties roads.
Rust City.

Many many vehicles would start to show rust around the wheelwells after 2-3 years.

Went back up there a couple of weeks ago for vacation.
That still happens. Across ALL brands. Not Ford specific.
Saw a reasonably recent Dodge RAM pickup. Rust.
Chevy Silverado, Rust.
etc, etc....
Thinking about it when I go to costal towns now their cars always look more rust bitten. I guess from more salt in the air.
 

DSzymborski

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My first car was a 1988 Ford Tempo. A gift, though hardly a high-prestige car in 1994.

Weirdly, that car lasted me until 2004, though it took like seven alternators to get there. Then, I got a Mazda 6, which had a Ford Duratec V6, which never gave me problems. I owned that for 14 years. Only got rid of it as it was up to 120,000 miles and a high percentage of my driving miles are occasional drives between Ohio and Maryland (I don't have a commute).

Got a Subaru Crosstrek in 2018. Like the car, but I miss the V6. Hoping that the next Crosstrek has a turbo option in which case I may swap. If not, I might go back and get the turbo Mazda 3 or a Golf R. I'm generally too thrifty to pull the trigger, but I still kinda want an Audi RS3.

The Big Three manufacturers kinda earned their poor reputations in the 70s-90s. They tend to be much more competent these days, especially when it comes to durability. I'd have no problem buying one, if a car fit my needs.
 
. If not, I might go back and get the turbo Mazda 3 or a Golf R. I'm generally too thrifty to pull the trigger, but I still kinda want an Audi RS3.
Have you looked at the Focus RS mk3 or ST mk4? The RS is a brilliant and fun car, the ST is still fun but slightly nicer for daily driving but misses the precision and balance of the RS’s AWD. The RS is faster from 0-60mph but the ST is actually marginally faster from a rolling start due to being lighter.
 

Jmi20

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My first car was a 1988 Ford Tempo. A gift, though hardly a high-prestige car in 1994.

Weirdly, that car lasted me until 2004, though it took like seven alternators to get there. Then, I got a Mazda 6, which had a Ford Duratec V6, which never gave me problems. I owned that for 14 years. Only got rid of it as it was up to 120,000 miles and a high percentage of my driving miles are occasional drives between Ohio and Maryland (I don't have a commute).

Got a Subaru Crosstrek in 2018. Like the car, but I miss the V6. Hoping that the next Crosstrek has a turbo option in which case I may swap. If not, I might go back and get the turbo Mazda 3 or a Golf R. I'm generally too thrifty to pull the trigger, but I still kinda want an Audi RS3.

The Big Three manufacturers kinda earned their poor reputations in the 70s-90s. They tend to be much more competent these days, especially when it comes to durability. I'd have no problem buying one, if a car fit my needs.
thats a lot of alternators haha, i could tolerate maybe one or two.

i guess they really are much more competent these days. My dads company lent him a 2011 hyundai elantra as a company car before. They had a reputation of being disposable before that but that elantra gave less problems than his same year corolla did in 5 years till the hyundai was replaced. I actually bought that corolla from him 1.5 years ago and have had to replace the shocks since then, it was also replaced before i bought it. The elantra never had any such issue. None at all.

it seems clear to me that i should give ford a shot. This really might just be a case of people being stuck in the past and not looking at the present or towards the future.
 

Jmi20

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I’ve decided, the ford ranger it is.

ive looked at local reviews and sales figures, if ford is bad why is its pickup truck one of the best selling here? (Specifically the ranger raptor) the sales figures speak for themselves. People like it so they buy it, the ones who say bad things about it are probably talking about older models and have no clue about newer ones.

I’ve never actually seen any ford or american cars that have broken down or were “found on the road dead”. Ive seen toyotas, nissans (two 350z’s, unforgettable), and hondas on the side of the road.

ive always had a liking for american cars. I remember driving my previous boss’s chevy suburban before and the air conditioning was sublime! I loved the c6 corvette as a kid and dreamt of owning one some day. Ive always wanted that special edition ford lynx/laser and i still want one today, but don’t need one.

my grandfather only had european cars. Mercedes benz, audi, an alfa romeo that was junked cause nobody would buy it, an opel; which i think was owned by GM at the time, aha! and a vw beetle.
My parents only had asian cars such as toyota, honda, mitsubishi, and hyundai.
so i guess i would be the generation who only has american cars, ford, chevy, dodge… demon (in my dreams), and uhh jeep?
 
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