News FSP Debuts World's First 12VO SFX PSUs for Tiny, Efficient Systems

Blacksad999

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Jun 28, 2020
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That law only applies to the OEM market, which supplies all of the office computers for companies and such. It doesn't apply to the DIY market in any sense.
 

spongiemaster

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Dec 12, 2019
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California be like "Sure, you can gobble down hundreds of kWh per year mining cryptocurrency, but you better not be only 60% efficient at sleep!"
Doesn't apply to DIY PC's. Mining rigs are overwhelming DIY systems. Be careful what you wish for. Removal of the DIY exception could be the result.

There's probably millions of office PC's in California idling at night and over weekends in California. Reducing that power draw makes complete sense.
 
California be like "Sure, you can gobble down hundreds of kWh per year mining cryptocurrency, but you better not be only 60% efficient at sleep!"
The law applies to any sort of "non-active" power state, which also means the computer powered on, sitting there doing nothing. Lots of non-home computers that are on but not doing anything because they need/want said computer available for use at a moment's notice.

And there are lots of home users who don't put their computer in some lower power state because I dunno, laziness.
 
Anyhoo....

The new requirement is only for system builders, but it's not only for California. It's for CA, Vermont, Washington, Colorado, Hawaii, Maine, Oregon and BC Canada.

The requirement is an 80 PLUS Gold PSU that can do 70%+ efficiency at 2% load (the load where a PC would likely be in standby) and support modern standby mode. To achieve 70% efficiency at 2% load, an ATX12V PSU needs to use a LLC controller with burst mode and have a supervisor IC that can support the timings required to do MSM. This adds cost to your PSU.

Why ATX12VO makes sense (despite what Igor says):

* The voltage that your motherboard receives from an ATX12V PSU is regulated again at the board today. So just expecting them to regulate from +12V instead of +5V or +3.3V is not a cost or real estate adder.

* The PSU doesn't need bust mode to achieve higher efficiency since it's only producing a single output voltage. This means cheaper PWM controllers can be used once again.

* +3.3V and +5V are removed from the PSU. Making the PSU cheaper.

* Getting rid of +3.3V and +5V buck converters from the PSU makes it easier to make a smaller PSU. You can increase your +12V and actually put out higher wattage, smaller ATX12VO PSUs than any ATX12V PSU.

* There are less cables coming from the PSU.

* The ATX12VO is a HELL of a lot easier to route, hide, work with, than the big bulky 24-pin.

The downside to ATX12VO:

* If you need +3.3V or +5V for SATA drives, this power needs to come from the motherboard. This DOES add cost and real estate to the motherboard. Only solution around this is M.2, but those are more expensive and limited in capacities (so far).

* If you need +5V for an RGB pump head or RGB fans, etc. you'll need a buck device to take the +12V down to +5V. Something like this: https://www.corsair.com/us/en/Categories/Products/Accessories-|-Parts/CORSAIR-+5V-Load-Balancer/p/CP-8920275
 
* If you need +3.3V or +5V for SATA drives, this power needs to come from the motherboard. This DOES add cost and real estate to the motherboard. Only solution around this is M.2, but those are more expensive and limited in capacities (so far).
This will probably only work for more premium SKUs, but what if the PSU manufacturer includes a plug-in module that can make the necessary voltages for SATA?

I'm already thinking about it being on the motherboard and how much of a pain it'll be to route the cables around since a lot of cases like to hide drives in separate compartments, which conveniently happens to be near where the PSU lives.
 

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