G.Skill Builds "World's Fastest" DDR4 At 3333 MHz

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jossrik

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The timings are fast enough that with quad channel performance, there's not a big loss of performance. The way to look at it is GHz is bandwidth and CAS/CL is speed. There is a formula for figuring out how fast it is in nanoseconds, but it's pretty reliably between 10 and 12 nanoseconds for modern RAM. Really Really fast RAM is like 8 nanoseconds, but when you compare frames per second for fast RAM and slow RAM it's like a 1 or 2 % difference. There's absolutely no real world benefit of having blazing fast RAM.
 

icemunk

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The timings are fast enough that with quad channel performance, there's not a big loss of performance. The way to look at it is GHz is bandwidth and CAS/CL is speed. There is a formula for figuring out how fast it is in nanoseconds, but it's pretty reliably between 10 and 12 nanoseconds for modern RAM. Really Really fast RAM is like 8 nanoseconds, but when you compare frames per second for fast RAM and slow RAM it's like a 1 or 2 % difference. There's absolutely no real world benefit of having blazing fast RAM.
lol the "real world benefit" is bragging rights at LAN parties :p
 

mamasan2000

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In games RAM speed might not matter but for everything else...
The caches on the CPU are running at hundreds of gigs per second. DDR3 memory tops out at 5 gigs/s. So, games that use RAM memory ... bad game. Poor performance. You want to avoid getting anything from memory as much as possible once the game is loaded.
 

dstarr3

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That's why graphics cards have onboard memory. Much faster memory with much less latency, and much less overhead to access compared to system memory. Games access GPU memory first and (should) try to minimize the amount of system memory it utilizes for these reasons.

If you use programs that use heaps of RAM like video editing, CAD, etc, then yeah, you'll benefit a bit from the increased frequency. But for general day-to-day use and/or gaming, you won't see any benefit at all, really. Save the scratch and put it into something more practical. Like, say, a tank of gas.
 

gsxrme

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I personally take the first 3 cas timings and add them together. Divided by 3 then divided by speed. The end number is a performance number I use to scale whats better.

so...

(((9+9+9)/3)/2200)=244.44 <----- DDR3

&

(((16+16+16)/3)/3300)=208.31 <----- DDR4 dual channel
(((16+16+16)/3)/3300)x2)=416.63 <----- DDR4 quad channel

This isn't 100% on key but it really helps. Personally DDR4 timings and speed isn't ready. DDR4 with quad seems nice but once the dual channel DDR4 boards release we will need much higher clock speeds or much lower CAS timings to compete with DDR3 in its prime.

Fyi, im running Gskill 2400Mhz 16GB kit @ 2200 cas 9-9-9-27 @ 1.67v w/o any problems in years.
 

Kieran Warren

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In a couple years time this speed will probably become standard. Just like 2133MHz and 2400MHz on RAM was rarely used just a few years ago and now 2133MHz is more or less a standard for a high end gaming PC.
 

ohim

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In games RAM speed might not matter but for everything else...
The caches on the CPU are running at hundreds of gigs per second. DDR3 memory tops out at 5 gigs/s. So, games that use RAM memory ... bad game. Poor performance. You want to avoid getting anything from memory as much as possible once the game is loaded.
Are you for real ? You know the cache memory on a CPU is like few megabytes... how can you even say, your game must avoid using memory because bad performance?


I think you`re mistaking... most PCs use 1600 Mhz... the rest is just for show or in some cases only APUs can make use of the higher speeds.
 

c123456

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I personally take the first 3 cas timings and add them together. Divided by 3 then divided by speed. The end number is a performance number I use to scale whats better.

so...

(((9+9+9)/3)/2200)=244.44 <----- DDR3

&

(((16+16+16)/3)/3300)=208.31 <----- DDR4 dual channel
(((16+16+16)/3)/3300)x2)=416.63 <----- DDR4 quad channel

This isn't 100% on key but it really helps. Personally DDR4 timings and speed isn't ready. DDR4 with quad seems nice but once the dual channel DDR4 boards release we will need much higher clock speeds or much lower CAS timings to compete with DDR3 in its prime.

Fyi, im running Gskill 2400Mhz 16GB kit @ 2200 cas 9-9-9-27 @ 1.67v w/o any problems in years.
The way those numbers ended up, I'd go ahead and arbitrarily take the natural log of them to get a relativity benchmark to show linear progression.
 

agentbb007

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Sorry mamasan2000 but you are just plain wrong, every single game, heck every single app designed today uses RAM.
 

mamasan2000

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Of course it does load from HDD/RAM at some point (when you load a map/start the program for example) but you are not running a game that is loading stuff from RAM every frame. Think about it. Say a game uses 2 gigs of memory on the GPU. Does it get that from RAM? No, you would have 2 FPS (2 gig x 2 = 4 gigs/s, RAM speed is approx 5 gigs/s on DDR3). Does it get that from HDD? No, you would get 1 FPS every 15 seconds (150 megs/s divided by 2000megs).
 

BadBoyGreek

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I think you`re mistaking... most PCs use 1600 Mhz... the rest is just for show or in some cases only APUs can make use of the higher speeds.
+1. In the case of desktop CPUs, they'll hit their limits long before they ever approach the limit of the RAM itself. No point in having all that extra speed overhead when you'll likely never use it.
 
For Haswell, the ideal RAM speed is DDR3-2400. Some games will seem to have no difference, but for intensive games like BF4, an obvious performance gain is had with high speed RAM. The common term thrown around is "real world benefit". Everyone obviously has a different purpose for their system, but the idea is to maximize the system's capability. Why buy the best GPU, CPU, and.. standard RAM? You may save $20-30.. but then find out a game is not performing as well as it should be. At that point, you may think you just need a computer when all along it was because you wanted to save a few bucks on RAM.

For DDR4, latency is high compared to DDR3. DDR3 is high compared to DDR2. There isn't much talk that DDR3-1600 CL9 has a higher latency than DDR2-800 CL5. No ones going to prefer DDR2-800 CL5 because the latency is lower, same with DDR3 to DDR4. Bandwidth on DDR4 is essentially double compared to DDR3. DDR3 latency is lower, but keep in mind most DDR4 kits are still 1.20V. Once you raise the DRAM Voltage, timings can be improved, so expect many 1.20V+ kits with better timings shortly. ;)
 

terroralpha

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Really Really fast RAM is like 8 nanoseconds, but when you compare frames per second for fast RAM and slow RAM it's like a 1 or 2 % difference. There's absolutely no real world benefit of having blazing fast RAM.
not true on two counts. originally i built my computer using 4x4GB crucial 2133MHz RAM. while running said i was unable to overclock my CPU past 4.2GHz without having stability issues. after upgrading to 4x4GB G.Skill 3000 MHz RAM i am now able to run my 5930K stable at 4.7GHz and my video rendering times went down by about 30% overall. 10% without a CPU overclock, just faster ram.
 

bthiago

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Those DDR4 goes well with ASRock Extreme4? Or it require other hardware`s? I`d like to know more about the DDR4s
 
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