Question Gaming PC build around $2500

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Duskie

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Jun 19, 2016
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The build I did had WiFi 6 built in, newest WiFi tech available. There is absolutely no reason to buy a separate WiFi card in 2020, just like there’s no reason to buy a separate sound card unless you are producing music professionally.

You definitely want an aftermarket cooler for the higher end Ryzen CPUs unless you don’t mind the noise of the stock CPU ramping up all the time. Even if it’s a better air cooler rather than water cooling.

I selected a 3800x because it’s only $30 more than a 3700x and has a higher thermal limit to give you a higher sustained boost speed as long as it’s cooled properly.

Gigabyte motherboard I selected is ready for the future with all the newest tech and will support even future AMD processors. Good VRM as well.

Gskill NEO RAM is made specifically for AMD CPUs and I selected the sweet spot of 3600 with a CAS latency of 16, best you can do for price and performance. 32GB gives you plenty of memory for the future.

Samsung 970 evo is only beaten by the plus version and you’ll never notice the difference at the price premium. Very good SSD that will last longer than your system.

Lian li case that is very well reviewed with plenty of room for fans and radiators to customize. Added a NZXT x72 to keep that 3800x nice and cool and it will go great with this case.

Seasonic is one of the best you can buy and this gold rated PSU will power your system withou ANY issues at all.

EVGA makes some great GPUs and their warranty is even better. You definitely want to get the 2080ti if you are buying now.
Ah yes. Your build is fantastic, but is it really worth having a full tower over a mid tower? I figure that I may have problems transporting the PC as I may have to move in the near future. Also it bring up a bit of concern as EVGA RTX 2080 Ti has two fans and the ASUS RTX 2080 Ti has three. I'm not sure if it really impacts anything at all but it's a big enough discrepancy to bring up. Hope you understand where I'm coming from.
 

Duskie

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Jun 19, 2016
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Depends on what your expectations are. If you want to play every new game at maximum detail settings, this build will probably last a year, year and half. If you are willing to go down to high or medium settings in future games, you can easily pull off 4 years, maybe more. Lower the detail settings you are fine with, the longer the build will serve you, simple as that. Also depends on the resolution and refresh rate of your monitor, if it's a 4K or 1440p 144 Hz monitor, you'll need a GPU upgrade every 1.5-2 years to keep up with the demands of games. If it's 1440p or 1080p, again it'll last longer.

The processor is an 8 core 16 thread chip, and right now almost no game goes over 12 threads as far as I know, and even those games work just fine with 8 threads, plus more than 8 cores is not yet mainstream, so until 8 cores doesn't become 'low-end', the processor will serve you well. I'd say that's at least 3 years, probably 4, maybe more. You can get an aftermarket cooler since there's budget for it, but the cooler that comes with the chip is more than capable of running the chip at stock speeds and at moderate overclocks. Someone mentioned noise - it's very subjective. Some people find that the stock cooler is silent or manageable, others say it sounds loud. I'd recommend you to try the stock cooler first, and if you think it's loud, then get an aftermarket cooler. That way you won't unnecessarily blow $70-$170 on a liquid cooler without knowing if the free option serves you well enough anyway.

No worries on the questions, better safe than sorry is always good when building PC's :).
Sounds good. I've been playing on low - med all my life so I really don't mind downgrading my settings!
 

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