Question GPU clock speed constantly dropping when playing games

FalconXFury

Honorable
Jul 20, 2014
20
0
10,510
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Summary:

GPU clock speed constantly dropping when playing games causing bad frame spikes on ASUS ROG GL503V Scar Edition.

Hi, recently I've been getting bad lag spikes in most games that I've played, and after installing HWMonitor I discovered that every time I get lag, my GPU clock speed drops to about 150MHz. I opened my laptop last night and saw there was a decent build up of dust on one of the fans and so I cleaned it, and last night when I tried using it again the lag seemed to have gone, but again today the problem is still occurring, so I'm not entirely sure what the problem is.

When playing games my GPU was averaging around 89C-90C iirc. Even playing on the lowest settings I was still getting persistent drops. I can't remember exactly when this started to occur but is it possible that there is something I installed or changed that could affect this? Otherwise, what else is there I can do to remedy this regarding the hardware?

Will provide specs or more detail if necessary.

Thanks.
 

dotas1

Admirable
When playing games my GPU was averaging around 89C-90C
That here, is your answer. The GPU is thermal throttling. Most probably the CPU as well. It's a very common issue with laptops and there are limited things to do that are non invasive to the interior.
  • Clear the dust
  • Have the laptop in an open and clean surface to ensure proper airflow
  • Buy a cooling pad
If you are under warranty I wouldn't open the laptop to mess with anything inside but if you are not, then you can also replace the thermal paste on GPU/CPU. If you do not know how, you can take it to a repair shop.
 

FalconXFury

Honorable
Jul 20, 2014
20
0
10,510
0
That here, is your answer. The GPU is thermal throttling. Most probably the CPU as well. It's a very common issue with laptops and there are limited things to do that are non invasive to the interior.
  • Clear the dust
  • Have the laptop in an open and clean surface to ensure proper airflow
  • Buy a cooling pad
If you are under warranty I wouldn't open the laptop to mess with anything inside but if you are not, then you can also replace the thermal paste on GPU/CPU. If you do not know how, you can take it to a repair shop.
Thanks for the reply. Is undervolting my gpu something that could help with the thermal throttling at all? From what I've seen it helps keep the heat a bit lower.
 

dotas1

Admirable
If you know how to do it (it's not the same with a desktop CPU/GPU, it's actually more difficult) and you use a quality thermal paste it will certainly have a difference. You have to understand though, if your laptop was getting high temps from the beginning, there is not much you can do about it. Most laptops are airflow restricted and thus they thermal throttle.
 

FalconXFury

Honorable
Jul 20, 2014
20
0
10,510
0
If you know how to do it (it's not the same with a desktop CPU/GPU, it's actually more difficult) and you use a quality thermal paste it will certainly have a difference. You have to understand though, if your laptop was getting high temps from the beginning, there is not much you can do about it. Most laptops are airflow restricted and thus they thermal throttle.
The frame drop problem only begun occurring recently, I'm pretty sure. I can't think of anything significant that happened prior to this, and it seemed to have a relatively quick onset.

I should be able to find some sort of tutorial online to get the gist of what I need to do to reapply thermal paste I'm hoping? Are there any particular things I should be aware of and be careful of?
 

dotas1

Admirable
If it only started recently then I suggest that you scan for malware as well. If something else uses the CPU and GPU, like mining malware, you would get higher temps.

If you have not done something similar to a laptop and you are not familiar with such things, you should NOT try it. It's safer to have it done to a repair shop. That way you ensure that is done "correctly".
You can look for tutorials for YOUR specific laptop and not any tutorial on how to do it. If you REALLY think that you will be able to do it, give it a try. Again, I do NOT suggest it if you are not familiar doing stuff like that.
 

FalconXFury

Honorable
Jul 20, 2014
20
0
10,510
0
If it only started recently then I suggest that you scan for malware as well. If something else uses the CPU and GPU, like mining malware, you would get higher temps.

If you have not done something similar to a laptop and you are not familiar with such things, you should NOT try it. It's safer to have it done to a repair shop. That way you ensure that is done "correctly".
You can look for tutorials for YOUR specific laptop and not any tutorial on how to do it. If you REALLY think that you will be able to do it, give it a try. Again, I do NOT suggest it if you are not familiar doing stuff like that.
Did a complete scan recently, no malware or anything. In the past I've built a PC and upgraded mine and a couple of friends' a few times so I have a basic understanding of that, and I did end up opening my laptop with not too much hassle. I found this tutorial which seems to be an adequate example and I think I'll be alright after watching it closely a few times. I inquired about getting a repair shop to do the repasting but I was told it'd cost around 160 dollars which I just can't afford at the moment.

Thanks for your responses, I really appreciate it.
 

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