GPU runs hotter

anonymous890

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Jan 15, 2018
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Before: 1 intake, 1 exhaust
Now: 3 intake, 1 exhaust

Before I had windows 10 1608, while playing black desert (medium settings, non-remastered) my gpu temp goes at max of 73C while afk for like 30 mins.

Now I installed 2 more intakes, then updated windows 10 to 1803, now my gpu becomes hotter easily, and reaches max of 76C while afk for 30 mins.

Why is it like this? I thought putting more intake would improve the temp, or is it because of having a new version of windows 10?

Do you know any service on windows 10 that I can disable that causes for the gpu to become hotter?
 
If you can install another exhaust fan (or switch one of the intakes to exhaust (at the top).

Check the GPU to make sure that all fans are spinning normally. Blow out any accumulated dust.

Next using a GPU overclock application, change the fan cooling setting to custom. Start the cooling at around 40 % at 40 C and ramp it up to 100% at 75 C.
 

anonymous890

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Does exhaust help with improving the temps?
And do you mean fan curve? I do have one, here is the pic of my fan curve: https://imgur.com/a/YRjXoyK
Is my fan curve efficient?
 
Nov 16, 2018
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If you have a BIOS option to disable the external GPU and keep the internal one, then it could well reduce the heat generation.

Using device manager though is unlikely to make much difference.
Hope this will help you
 


Yes you want an overall good flow of cool air from the lower front of the case to the upper rear of the case. And although you want positive pressure in the case, just one exhaust is reducing the overall flow of air.

On your fan curve, set the initial point to around 30% at 30 C. That way the fan begins cooling at a lower temperature. And I would suggest that you change the 100% fan to around 75C. As it is now the fans don't reach 100 until 100 C.

At 100C the GPU is already throttling back the power to the GPU. You want the fans at 100% well before the throttling begins.
 
For example, my system is set up with two 120mm front intake fans, two top 120mm fans, and one rear 120mm fan. It works pretty well. I dont't need two top fans but they came with my case. So I just have the RPM turned down on those top fans. It works and it keeps the fan noise down.

Of course that doesn't include the CPU cooler fans (Noctua NH-D14)
 

anonymous890

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Ahmm would you mind explaining these external internal GPUs? is there a harm in doing so?
 


Some business computers have the option of multi-monitor. With that enabled you can use a graphics card at the same time as the motherboard integrated graphics. I doubt that you have that option, and in any case it wouldn't affect the temperature of your GPU.

Most gaming PC's do not have that feature. With the graphics card installed the the integrated graphics are disabled automatically by default. You can change that in the BIOS to force the system to use the integrated graphics or the graphics card in the PCI Express x 16 slot. Or you can set it to the default which is Auto.
 
That link does seem to be what anonymous890 is referring to. It refers to disabling the graphics card in a laptop and using the integrated graphics of the laptop motherboard (assuming that it has one).

That would reduce the heat inside the laptop, but it would also very much limit the graphics on the laptop (probably a gaming laptop since it has a graphics card).


But that doesn't really apply hear since this is a desktop. Yes, the OP could force the motherboard to use the integrated graphics in the BIOS. But that defeats the purpose of having a graphics card. The only time I've used this is to troubleshoot the graphics card. If a graphics card has no video output, then (by using the integrated graphics to generate a display) you may be able to update the graphics driver of the installed graphics card.

Also unlike the laptop (where the graphics "card" may not be removable) the graphics card on a desktop can simply be removed or replaced. (Some gaming laptop do have the feature of removable graphics cards.)

To summarize, you can disable the discreet graphics card. It will reduce the temperature inside the PC. But it forces the system to use the motherboard integrated graphics. The same thing is accomplished by simply removing the graphics card, plus it would improve the cooling airflow of the PC.
 

anonymous890

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So I can't use shivkhurana idea? since I have a PC and not a laptop? it only applies to laptop users?
 

anonymous890

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UPDATE:

as I said, installing 2 new case fans didn't improve the GPU's temperature, but worsen it instead. Here are the places of my fan:

2 front intake fans
1 top intake fan
1 exhaust rear fan

Cause is tecware F1

can you tell me how can i position these fans well? I live in the Philippines btw.
 
The positioning of the fans can cool the overall inside of the case. Two 120mm or 140 mm front intakes, one or two 120mm or 140mm fans on top, and one 120mm or 140 mm fan at the rear is just about the ideal positioning. In addition, some PC cases have the option of a side fan. This blows cool air directly onto the GPU. If you have that option it would help bring down the GPU temperatures.


You can also control the RPM of the fans for more effective cooling . Or you can link the control of the fans to the CPU temperature for example.

Most likely the GPU needs to have the dust blown out of the heat sink. Make sure that all GPU fans are operational. Many GPU's have a run silent feature. That is the fans aren't turned on until a set temperature (around 60 - 65 C). Following that you can set up a custom RPM to Temperature ramp (using an overclock application like MSI Afterburner). The custom temperature ramp also overrides the quiet fan feature.



Those are the options.

 

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