Question Graphics card causing shut downs

matharoo

Commendable
Dec 18, 2016
18
0
1,510
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What happens

Computer restarts around a couple times everyday. No BSOD; the screen either freezes or shows a black screen, and then the computer restarts.

Doesn't happen when playing games but I don't play games a lot. When I do, they work fine.
GPU temps are fine, stays around 70° at full load. Doesn't crash even while stress testing (FurMark).

Why I think it's the graphics card (RTX 2060)

I removed the card and tested with my internal graphics for 3 days; it didn't crash once.
It can't be the power supply because I already replaced it.

What I have tried

I've tried using the oldest graphics drivers available for my card and the default ones that come with Windows (using rollback). It still crashed, so it doesn't seem to be a driver issue.

My question

The solution seems to be to send it in for warranty, but is there anything else I can try before doing that? Maybe it's something fixable? I'm not tech-savvy so I would definitely be missing something.

  • CPU: i5 8400
  • Motherboard: ECS H310H5-M2
  • Ram: 8x2
  • SSD/HDD: 2 SSDs, 1 HDDs
  • GPU: RTX 2060
  • PSU: Corsair CX650
  • OS: Windows 10.0.17763 Build 17763
  • Checked Event Viewer, it gives a 41 Kernel-Power error so it essentially says nothing
  • Ran memtest86 on both my RAM sticks, 0 errors
  • Replaced my PSU, upgraded from Tier 6 to Tier 2
  • Changed my power cable
  • Updated my graphics drivers
  • Ran stress tests on GPU
 
Last edited:
May 29, 2019
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If you already replaced the power supply, then it probably is the graphics card. I would try to plug it into one of the other PCIe slots, and replace the cord you are using to connect it to the monitor (HDMI, Display Port, etc.).

You could also try putting your graphics card into a known-working PC if you have access to one. If none of these things work, you might be hosed. I would try to see if you can still use your warranty.
 

matharoo

Commendable
Dec 18, 2016
18
0
1,510
0
I would try to plug it into one of the other PCIe slots, and replace the cord you are using to connect it to the monitor (HDMI, Display Port, etc.).
There are no other slots, and the same cord works with my internal graphics.

You could take it out and try on another pc to see if the problems comes again.
I don't have another PC to test on, and this problem's frequency is so low that testing on someone else's computer isn't possible.
 

onespeedbiker

Prominent
Apr 13, 2019
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Have you done a clean install of the NIVDIA drivers. When uninstall NIVDIA drivers the usually remain on your hard drive c:\NVIDIA. I would uninstall your NVIDIA drivers and then delete the c:\NVIDIA folder. Then reinstall the newer drivers, making sure you click the clean install box in the installer.

You can also use this way https://forums.tomshardware.com/faq/how-to-perform-a-clean-install-of-your-video-card-drivers.2402269/

Also, anytime you do not have a normal shut down, you should do a cold boot. Unplug your PC, press the power button for about 5 seconds, wait 10 minutes, then plug your PC back in and press the power button to start.
 
Last edited:

matharoo

Commendable
Dec 18, 2016
18
0
1,510
0
Have you done a clean install of the NIVDIA drivers. When uninstall NIVDIA drivers the usually remain on your hard drive c:\NVIDIA. I would uninstall your NVIDIA drivers and then delete the c:\NVIDIA folder. Then reinstall the newer drivers, making sure you click the clean install box in the installer.
Thanks. I'm still running on integrated graphics so when I plug the GPU back in, I'll do that.

Also, anytime you do not have a normal shut down, you should do a cold boot. Unplug your PC, press the power button for about 5 seconds, wait 10 minutes, then plug your PC back in and press the power button to start.
I would love to know why we have to do that and what it does.
 
May 29, 2019
78
12
45
2
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