Question Gtx 1650 showing visual glitches+ microwaving Gpu's

Apr 20, 2021
5
0
10
0
i3 9100F @4.2Ghz
Gtx 1650 4GB
2X8GB (16GB) RAM
700w Power Supply

I know for a fact its the 1650 causing display issues, but have to keep in mind it's a low profile card. I get these colored blocks and the system crashes to desktop whenever I try to load Warzone. Is there any way to doctor the card back to health? Does anyone have the
results of nuking a card in the microwave? I'm willing to try anything as my 1050 is a bottleneck.
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
Ovens, people put GPUs in Ovens to try and fix them, not the microwave...

Microwave is instant death to unshielded electronics, which is pretty much all of them. Microwaves are meant to heat water in food, they just arc across metal and semiconductors, destroying all internal structure and turning bits of everything into little puffs of magic smoke.

Sounds like the GPU memory is on its way out. Oven reflow might help, but is more likely to just melt off something useful and kill the card. You have to be very careful and it is really a technique for specific parts with a known soldering/manufacturing issue, not necessarily a quick fix for every problem.
 
Reactions: Fatblabs

Fatblabs

Great
Jun 29, 2021
193
9
85
0
Ovens, people put GPUs in Ovens to try and fix them, not the microwave...

Microwave is instant death to unshielded electronics, which is pretty much all of them. Microwaves are meant to heat water in food, they just arc across metal and semiconductors, destroying all internal structure and turning bits of everything into little puffs of magic smoke.

Sounds like the GPU memory is on its way out. Oven reflow might help, but is more likely to just melt off something useful and kill the card. You have to be very careful and it is really a technique for specific parts with a known soldering/manufacturing issue, not necessarily a quick fix for every problem.
idk if this is a joke, but it's hilarious XD
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
idk if this is a joke, but it's hilarious XD
I'm afraid it is a real thing. And it does, rarely, bring a malfunctioning card or laptop back to life, temporarily. Even SSDs on occasion.

The theory: Electronics go through many heat cycles, which causes expansion and contraction in different materials at different rates. Sometimes this can cause an intermittent connection between, say, a memory chip, and the board. Heating up the solder to the point of near melting can cause the connection to be made again.

The problem is the execution. People chuck whole cards in there without removing the heatsink, shroud, etc and end up melting things. Or they get the oven too hot and even up having all the components fall off the card. Cards that have components on both sides are particularly dangerous, as gravity will only help half the parts stay on.
 
Reactions: Fatblabs

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
metal in microwave?
Metals in microwave is actually fine, as long as the metal is thick and electrically conductive enough to not get vaporized and smooth enough not to cause massive local charge gradients. When I make hot cocoa, I leave the spoon in the glass all of the time, Haven't had an issue with it in 10+ years of doing so since most of the spoon is under-milk and micro-waves don't really get to touch it. Using metal containers might be an issue with the micro-waves only able to get in from the top.
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
Metals in microwave is actually fine, as long as the metal is thick and electrically conductive enough to not get vaporized and smooth enough not to cause massive local charge gradients. When I make hot cocoa, I leave the spoon in the glass all of the time, Haven't had an issue with it in 10+ years of doing so since most of the spoon is under-milk and micro-waves don't really get to touch it. Using metal containers might be an issue with the micro-waves only able to get in from the top.
Anything where the radio waves get absorbed at different rates essentially, if they are close enough together you will arcing and the potential generation of plasma.

Semiconductors are literally two layers of different materials next to each other, and these days, the parts are so small they are instantly destroyed. Likely to get arcs between solder balls, capacitors have many layers, particularly aluminum electrolytic, though they have metal cans that should protect them for the most part.

If you are bored one day, just cut a grape in half. Put both halves near each other but not touching. Makes nice fireballs.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS