Question GTX1060 vs 1050ti heat output in case?

alphacoyle

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Which would put out more heat into the case; the 1060 (3gb) with it's heatpiping providing extra cooling benefit, but 120w; or a 1050ti just fans blowing over fins, but only 75w?
Moderate usage; use GTA5 1080p Ultra settings for example. Case in XPS8300; one 92mm intake fan in front grill and chassis fan in rear?
 
A better cooler doesn't reduce the amount of heat going into a case (aside from perhaps a blower-style cooler exhausting heat directly out the back). It's simply moving that heat away from the GPU and into the air more effectively, to keep the card operating at a lower temperature. The same amount of heat is being produced no matter what cooler is used.

So, a 120 watt card should always be putting out around 50% more heat than an 80 watt card under load, at least when the graphics hardware is being pushed to its limits. If the CPU is holding back performance of the faster card, the difference in power draw and heat output might be lower. Neither of these cards is all that power-hungry though, so I doubt the heat output would be too much of a concern in most systems. You would want to make sure that your power supply is capable of delivering enough power to the card alongside the rest of your components though, and that it has a PCIe power cable that all cards over 75 watts (and even many 1050 Tis) will require.

As for the 1050 Ti vs the 1060 3GB, I would go with neither at this point if you are looking to buy new hardware. The 1650 SUPER has been out for a year already, and can be over 20% faster than a 1060 3GB, and over 80% faster than a 1050 Ti, while drawing about 100 watts under load. Just make sure it's the "SUPER" version of the card though, as the non-SUPER 1650 only performs roughly in-between a 1050 Ti and a 1060 3GB...
https://pcpartpicker.com/products/video-card/#c=476&sort=price&page=1

As for how the two cards you mentioned compare, the 1060 3GB tends to be around 50% faster than the 1050 Ti. The VRAM is a bit more limited, so one might be more likely to have to lower texture settings a little in some demanding games, but in most current titles it should be a lot faster. Still, with the 1650 SUPER available for as little as $165 brand new (US pricing) with 4GB of VRAM, from a price-to-performance standpoint, a 1060 3GB would need to be around $135, and a 1050 Ti around $90 brand new to offer similar value relative to the performance they provide. And for used cards, it might not be worth paying even that, as they will be lacking warranty coverage and may have been subject to a few years of use under unknown conditions, potentially affecting how long they last.
 
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To directly answer the question. The 1050ti is going to be cooler overall. Less power, less heat.

With that said I really cannot imagine a situation that a 1060 with an appropriate fan curve would cause situation inside almost any case.
 

animekenji

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It depends on the cooler attached. The 1050 Ti will produce less heat overall, but I have yet to see one with a blower cooler attached. They all vent into the case, from what I've seen. Some 1060's do come with blower coolers, and even though they might produce more heat overall than a 1050 Ti, the blower will push most of it out of the case. Yes, there are 1060's that don't use blowers, and those would vent more heat into the case than the 1050 Ti, but if you have good air circulation in your case then it won't be a huge problem. If your case is something like an ITX or other small case, where heat buildup can sometimes be an issue, then I'd go with a blower style cooler.
 

alphacoyle

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To directly answer the question. The 1050ti is going to be cooler overall. Less power, less heat.

With that said I really cannot imagine a situation that a 1060 with an appropriate fan curve would cause situation inside almost any case.
I guess I'm just wrapping my head around the whole GPU thing; I'm new to this. I've been basing a lot from watching videos showing GPU stats during gameplay; but right, it's the GPU that's heating up, so the venting I have isn't going to affect cooling of anything?
 
Many years ago I built a Luan Li mini server chassis into a gaming/HTPC and used a GTX960 inside it along with an i5.
I was super happy with it right up to about 5 minutes into hard game play.

It turns out that the stock fan curve on many GPU is set on being barely on if at all until ~70C in many cards. The issue I was having in my small case was that everything is fine then all of a sudden the GPU fans kick on and bring everything in the case to 70C. This particular case didn't have great airflow anyway, Mini ITX with a lot of hardware inside.
So, the reason I mention fan curve is that by simply using MSI Afterburner and setting an appropriate fan curve I was able to manage temps inside the case even with the sub optimal air flow and considering the power of the components.

I don't see that you specifically mention what case you are using, but as above I see not issue you couldn't overcome in most cases with the two GPU you are considering.
 

InvalidError

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Unless you are getting either GPU used or at a substantial discount, I agree with burner that a 1650S would make a lot more sense than either of the choices you listed: you get similar performance to the 1060/3GB with 1GB extra VRAM.

Heat-wise, as long as you clean the intake regularly enough to prevent dust buildup and strategically clutter the case to guide airflow where it needs to go, you don't need tons of airflow to achieve reasonable temperatures in a relatively low power build.

My worst build ever is my P4 on a mATX board inside an Antec Aria case: no case fan other than the PSU's, the HSF fins exhaust against the case on one side and where all the PSU cables come from on the other, so the CPU fan ends up screeching if I put the CPU-side panel on. Would have been fine if the S478 retention mechanism allowed the HSF to be rotated 90 degrees.
 

alphacoyle

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Many years ago I built a Luan Li mini server chassis into a gaming/HTPC and used a GTX960 inside it along with an i5.
I was super happy with it right up to about 5 minutes into hard game play.

It turns out that the stock fan curve on many GPU is set on being barely on if at all until ~70C in many cards. The issue I was having in my small case was that everything is fine then all of a sudden the GPU fans kick on and bring everything in the case to 70C. This particular case didn't have great airflow anyway, Mini ITX with a lot of hardware inside.
So, the reason I mention fan curve is that by simply using MSI Afterburner and setting an appropriate fan curve I was able to manage temps inside the case even with the sub optimal air flow and considering the power of the components.

I don't see that you specifically mention what case you are using, but as above I see not issue you couldn't overcome in most cases with the two GPU you are considering.
Is XPS8300 case.
 
An even more important suggestion I make to you in this instance is that you make sure your motherboard is not BIOS locked to a specific set of GPU. This is a common thing with Dell "gaming" computers.

I am fairly sure that this is the i7 2600 model, yes?
I owned one of these some years ago and it would only allow (3) GPU at that time that are FAR outdated by now. Might check the BIOS notes for revisions that corrected this issue?

Your PSU might need to be looked into as well.
 

alphacoyle

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Unless you are getting either GPU used or at a substantial discount, I agree with burner that a 1650S would make a lot more sense than either of the choices you listed: you get similar performance to the 1060/3GB with 1GB extra VRAM.

Heat-wise, as long as you clean the intake regularly enough to prevent dust buildup and strategically clutter the case to guide airflow where it needs to go, you don't need tons of airflow to achieve reasonable temperatures in a relatively low power build.

My worst build ever is my P4 on a mATX board inside an Antec Aria case: no case fan other than the PSU's, the HSF fins exhaust against the case on one side and where all the PSU cables come from on the other, so the CPU fan ends up screeching if I put the CPU-side panel on. Would have been fine if the S478 retention mechanism allowed the HSF to be rotated 90 degrees.
The Dell XPS8300 is justs
An even more important suggestion I make to you in this instance is that you make sure your motherboard is not BIOS locked to a specific set of GPU. This is a common thing with Dell "gaming" computers.

I am fairly sure that this is the i7 2600 model, yes?
I owned one of these some years ago and it would only allow (3) GPU at that time that are FAR outdated by now. Might check the BIOS notes for revisions that corrected this issue?

Your PSU might need to be looked into as well.
Is i5 but some difference, 2011 model. On Dell Community site seems anything up to Pascal is ok; 1050ti is suggested, and others have used 1060,70 without issue. Final bios update to A06.
 

alphacoyle

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Unless you are getting either GPU used or at a substantial discount, I agree with burner that a 1650S would make a lot more sense than either of the choices you listed: you get similar performance to the 1060/3GB with 1GB extra VRAM.

Heat-wise, as long as you clean the intake regularly enough to prevent dust buildup and strategically clutter the case to guide airflow where it needs to go, you don't need tons of airflow to achieve reasonable temperatures in a relatively low power build.

My worst build ever is my P4 on a mATX board inside an Antec Aria case: no case fan other than the PSU's, the HSF fins exhaust against the case on one side and where all the PSU cables come from on the other, so the CPU fan ends up screeching if I put the CPU-side panel on. Would have been fine if the S478 retention mechanism allowed the HSF to be rotated 90 degrees.
This is the big problem; XPS8300 bios doesn't support GTX1650 or any Turing card, Pascal is the limit.
 

alphacoyle

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Is not UEFI unfortunately; one year away from that. From Dell: "Legacy class 0 bios sytems need cards that support msdos VESA mode 103" guess that's the issue.
 

InvalidError

Titan
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Is not UEFI unfortunately; one year away from that. From Dell: "Legacy class 0 bios sytems need cards that support msdos VESA mode 103" guess that's the issue.
The only problem with not having UEFI is that you have no boot-time support. The system should still boot just fine using the IGP until the OS and GPU drivers are loaded.

For setups with no usable IGP, a work-around is to plop something like a GT710 in an x1/x4 slot for legacy BIOS boot purposes and whatever modern UEFI-only GPU you want in the x16 one.
 
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alphacoyle

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The only problem with not having UEFI is that you have no boot-time support. The system should still boot just fine using the IGP until the OS and GPU drivers are loaded.

For setups with no usable IGP, a work-around is to plop something like a GT710 in an x1/x4 slot for legacy BIOS boot purposes and whatever modern UEFI-only GPU you want in the x16 one.
Ok, that makes sense as it is like you say the boot up support that's the problem. So does it have to be a card that's length fits into a 4x slot, and can it be anything besides a GT710?
 

InvalidError

Titan
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Ok, that makes sense as it is like you say the boot up support that's the problem. So does it have to be a card that's length fits into a 4x slot, and can it be anything besides a GT710?
Based on the image I found for the XPS8300's motherboard, it looks like it only has x1 slots besides the main x16 one and they are box-ended, which means you cannot directly plug in an x8/x16 card into them, you'd have to use an x1 riser cable with open-ended slot like this: https://www.amazon.ca/Extension-Cable-Motherboard-Extender-Converter/dp/B07TDCCDD6 - notice that the "back" of the slot is open, which would let the remainder of an x8 or x16 card hang out in the breeze.

You could also just knock the back end of the bottom PCIe slot, though that would risk destroying the slot itself and sharp leftover edges may also damage the connector of whatever card you put in.

The card can be any GPU old enough to have legacy BIOS compatibility and low enough power to work off the PCIe slot + riser, only mentioned the GT710 because it is one of the lowest power and cheapest GPUs that is still readily available. However, Sandy Bridge CPUs have an IGP so you should be able to boot using it instead of jumping through hoops to fit an extra GPU just for that.
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
Over at Dell Community the problem people are having is not getting past the splash screen. So, would a card like this fit in that 1x slot and get the system past boot up?
If by "splash screen" you mean the POST/BIOS screen, then you may want to ask them if they enabled the IGP in BIOS first. Here's a post outlining the process that should work:
https://www.dell.com/community/XPS-Desktops/XPS-8300-looking-to-upgrade-GPU-anyway-to-use-Turing-or-limited/m-p/7737661/highlight/true#M55353
Although I am skeptical about the last bit on disabling the IGP once you are done since that means the BIOS won't have a usable display device at boot anymore.

Basically the same story here and it confirms my suspicion that you must leave the IGP ("Intel Multiple Monitors") enabled:
https://www.dell.com/community/XPS-Desktops/XPS-8300-GTX-1650-not-working/m-p/7657336/highlight/true#M52307

Tossing an x1 GT710 in an x1 PCIe slot should work too, just costs $40 and 10-15W more than using the IGP you already have.
 

alphacoyle

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So, you think that method would work, the other person had to leave the IGP plugged in to a 2nd monitor to get it to work? If so then I wouldn't need the additional GPU, just follow those steps (that's actually my thread you linked, in it I quoted the original poster who used that method.) Further reading last night seems some manufacturers support legacy & UEFI, and others don't; could that be part of it?
Here's the info I've collected regarding this so far:
Legacy class 0 bios sytems need cards that support msdos VESA mode 103.
See if there is a PCI SERR MSG setting in bios. turn that to off.
this option is in the maintenance section.
You cannot use the onboard video AND a PCI-E video card. Once a card is in the X16 slot you MUST use that card only.

Don't know if this is useful? So you think I don't need to buy that GT710, and can just use the integrated graphics following these steps:
Step 1: Download all relevant drivers for new GPU
Step 2: Reboot into your BIOS and make sure your integrated graphics option is set to AUTO. Save and reboot
Step 3: Power everything off, unplug the power cable and hold the power button until all LED's are gone. Unplug everything and remove old GPU.
Step 4: Install new GPU, and hook up the VGA cable from your computer to your monitor.
Step 5: Using integrated graphics (If a black screen pops up saying something about graphics and rebooting, you haven't set your BIOS correctly. Repeat step 2 and come back. This can be done with the new GPU installed, so no worries) load in to your computer and it should automatically download any and all updates and drivers for the new GPU. If not, go download them.
Step 6: Once all installations are complete, reboot your system. You should now be free to use the new GPU instead of the integrated graphics. Feel free to go back in to BIOS and disable your integrated graphics option, but you shouldn't have to as long as your monitor is on the same input setting as your GPU.
(but don't disable the integrated graphics option ;)
 
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