[SOLVED] High CPU temp on new build ?

Dec 8, 2021
19
0
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Specs:
  • i9-12900K (stock)
  • RTX 3080 TI
  • 360 EK AIO (top mounted)
  • Antec Dflux 600 Case
This current build has a top mounted 360 AIO at the top of the case. At idle the cpu temperatures are around 34C. When gaming the max cpu temperature I get are around 67C-80C.

I have applied new thermal paste, re-seated the pump. Turned up my radiator fans and case fans to around 1200-1400RPM. But still cannot solve the problem. I also open the tempered glass window and the temps were still high - didn't make a difference I think.

Does anyone know what the issue can be? Is my CPU broken? How can I check to see what is causing the high temps and what do I need to fix?


I also have another build with the exact same specs but with a Lancool II Mesh case with the same aio but front mounted and my idle temperatures on that PC are lower and get lower temps overall.
 

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
It's pretty simple. The fluid in the former system is being saturated with more heat; liquid may have greater thermal capacity than air, but it takes longer to cool it down.
During gaming, you have a gpu that easily pumps out 300-400w of heat - not counting transients - and a cpu that MIGHT see 150w? IDK. The 12900K runs with no power limits by default, unlike the other 12th gen cpus.
That does NOT mean it draws 300w in games... though, it might be possible with some tinkering, it's not going to do that off the bat.
In the Antec DFlux system, the AIO has to cope with cooling not just the cpu, but the heat coming off of everything below it - mainly the gpu. The gpu has access to the coolest air and usually doesn't deal with anything else - a psu shroud and maybe some storage drives.
In the Lancool II Mesh system, the gpu cooler is coping with the heat from the gpu, the cpu AIO and whatever is below it. The cpu AIO has access to fresh air.
The fluid in the former system is being saturated with more heat; liquid may have greater thermal capacity than air, but it takes longer to cool it down. That energy does not immediately up and vanish when it gets to the radiator.



that seems to be a problem.
How fast do the intakes run as they only thing stopping the heat going right into aio?
Have you seen that AIO mounting video Jayz2cents did as a follow up to the one from GN Steve? It's the noise caused by an air pocket that occurs with a front-mounted AIO with the radiator inlet+outlet pointed towards the top after it's seen some years of use and the fluid level has decreased.
The noise will annoy you and make you believe there's something wrong with it(there's not). It reminds me of the noise some aquarium hang-on-back filters make. You'll be forced to move the rad or replace the AIO.
This is generally a problem with 360mm and larger AIOs, as the tubes are the same length as on smaller units too: 380-400mm. Positioning the rad with in+out towards the bottom would resolve this, but many times, the tubes aren't long enough to do this, except with the smaller units.
Arctic's Liquid Freezer IIs, uncommonly, have 450mm long tubing. Front mount with rad in+out towards the bottom should be more likely, but then the thicker rad may prove to be an obstacle.

Slowing down or stopping intakes? The heated air still needs to get out...
 

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
Have you tried removing the front panel from the Antec case to allow for more air to come through and see if the temps do drop? I'd also try and reseat the pump block and this time, not tighten it all the way, leave maybe a quarter turn short of a full tightened mount. FYI, the Antec and Lian-Li cases aren't the same case...one promotes airflow/fresh air from being drawn in, while the other has a hideous plastic shroud that impedes nearly 50% or more of the fan's air intake.

Make and model of the motherboard and it's BIOS version? Are both builds with the exact same specs, all the way down to it's storage, OS version and PSU?

Could you include a picture of how the fans are oriented in the build? Also, take the AIO out of the chassis and see if the temps improve, if they do, the case is your culprit(provided the AIO doesn't have cavitation).
 

Zerk2012

Titan
Ambassador
Specs:
  • i9-12900K (stock)
  • RTX 3080 TI
  • 360 EK AIO (top mounted)
  • Antec Dflux 600 Case
This current build has a top mounted 360 AIO at the top of the case. At idle the cpu temperatures are around 34C. When gaming the max cpu temperature I get are around 67C-80C.

I have applied new thermal paste, re-seated the pump. Turned up my radiator fans and case fans to around 1200-1400RPM. But still cannot solve the problem. I also open the tempered glass window and the temps were still high - didn't make a difference I think.

Does anyone know what the issue can be? Is my CPU broken? How can I check to see what is causing the high temps and what do I need to fix?


I also have another build with the exact same specs but with a Lancool II Mesh case with the same aio but front mounted and my idle temperatures on that PC are lower and get lower temps overall.
I don't see a problem.
2 Different cases 34C is not high and 67 to 80C is still not high.
 
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Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
I also have another build with the exact same specs but with a Lancool II Mesh case with the same aio but front mounted and my idle temperatures on that PC are lower and get lower temps overall.
2 different primary air sources.
Front mounted has direct access to the coolest air.
Top mounted has access to the warmest air, heated up by the gpu.

Then you wonder why so many suggest top mounting cpu AIOs...
The 360mm's size and short tubes prevents you from keeping it installed at the front for its entire life.
 
Dec 8, 2021
19
0
10
0
Have you tried removing the front panel from the Antec case to allow for more air to come through and see if the temps do drop? I'd also try and reseat the pump block and this time, not tighten it all the way, leave maybe a quarter turn short of a full tightened mount. FYI, the Antec and Lian-Li cases aren't the same case...one promotes airflow/fresh air from being drawn in, while the other has a hideous plastic shroud that impedes nearly 50% or more of the fan's air intake.

Make and model of the motherboard and it's BIOS version? Are both builds with the exact same specs, all the way down to it's storage, OS version and PSU?

Could you include a picture of how the fans are oriented in the build? Also, take the AIO out of the chassis and see if the temps improve, if they do, the case is your culprit(provided the AIO doesn't have cavitation).
I have tried removing the Antec’s plastic front cover but could not get it to come off. So instead I took off the tempered glass side panel off and it didn’t seem to drop the cpu temps. I have reseated the pump, applied thermal paste twice now and tighten the pump screws more. Still no improvements.

The Antec and Lian Li builds literally both have the same specs, same Windows 10 and everything is stock. The only difference is the case and placement of the aio.

The motherboard is the Asus Strix Z690-F both with the same factory bios version (0403).

I don’t know what the issue could be with the Antec build. I know for a fact the temps should not be this hot when gaming. Still trying to figure it out if anyone knows please let us know.

 
Last edited:

Colif

Win 11 Master
Moderator
The problem is caused by all the air coming out of the 3080 being sucked into AIO since its above the GPU in case.
The 360mm's size and short tubes prevents you from keeping it installed at the front for its entire life.
that seems to be a problem.
How fast do the intakes run as they only thing stopping the heat going right into aio?
 

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
It's pretty simple. The fluid in the former system is being saturated with more heat; liquid may have greater thermal capacity than air, but it takes longer to cool it down.
During gaming, you have a gpu that easily pumps out 300-400w of heat - not counting transients - and a cpu that MIGHT see 150w? IDK. The 12900K runs with no power limits by default, unlike the other 12th gen cpus.
That does NOT mean it draws 300w in games... though, it might be possible with some tinkering, it's not going to do that off the bat.
In the Antec DFlux system, the AIO has to cope with cooling not just the cpu, but the heat coming off of everything below it - mainly the gpu. The gpu has access to the coolest air and usually doesn't deal with anything else - a psu shroud and maybe some storage drives.
In the Lancool II Mesh system, the gpu cooler is coping with the heat from the gpu, the cpu AIO and whatever is below it. The cpu AIO has access to fresh air.
The fluid in the former system is being saturated with more heat; liquid may have greater thermal capacity than air, but it takes longer to cool it down. That energy does not immediately up and vanish when it gets to the radiator.



that seems to be a problem.
How fast do the intakes run as they only thing stopping the heat going right into aio?
Have you seen that AIO mounting video Jayz2cents did as a follow up to the one from GN Steve? It's the noise caused by an air pocket that occurs with a front-mounted AIO with the radiator inlet+outlet pointed towards the top after it's seen some years of use and the fluid level has decreased.
The noise will annoy you and make you believe there's something wrong with it(there's not). It reminds me of the noise some aquarium hang-on-back filters make. You'll be forced to move the rad or replace the AIO.
This is generally a problem with 360mm and larger AIOs, as the tubes are the same length as on smaller units too: 380-400mm. Positioning the rad with in+out towards the bottom would resolve this, but many times, the tubes aren't long enough to do this, except with the smaller units.
Arctic's Liquid Freezer IIs, uncommonly, have 450mm long tubing. Front mount with rad in+out towards the bottom should be more likely, but then the thicker rad may prove to be an obstacle.

Slowing down or stopping intakes? The heated air still needs to get out...
 

Colif

Win 11 Master
Moderator
yes, i seen that video before. I don't need to click link to know which it is.

Slowing down or stopping intakes?
neither, i was going to suggest making them as fast as possible as they only thing keeping heat out of AIO fans

I can't have my tubes down as they aren't long enough, but I know the gist of the video to know as long as pump is below the top of radiator it should be fine. Its not perfect but its not the worst thing you can do.

I have had fish tanks before, maybe it will bring back good memories if I ever get it on my 240. After you have a fishtank in your room for 4 years, silence is hardest thing to sleep with... but I digress.

wonder what it would be like if he swapped top AIO to intake instead of exhaust, sure would blow hot air out back then
 

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
neither, i was going to suggest making them as fast as possible as they only thing keeping heat out of AIO fans

I can't have my tubes down as they aren't long enough, but I know the gist of the video to know as long as pump is below the top of radiator it should be fine. Its not perfect but its not the worst thing you can do.

I have had fish tanks before, maybe it will bring back good memories if I ever get it on my 240. After you have a fishtank in your room for 4 years, silence is hardest thing to sleep with... but I digress.

wonder what it would be like if he swapped top AIO to intake instead of exhaust, sure would blow hot air out back then
But the noise - it'll get too loud...

Yeah, the Fractal Design S2, right? The horizontal depth in that one makes it harder to do.

I've already tried that, but the 1080Ti I've got doesn't pull quite as much juice. I can tell you that while the cpu would like it, the gpu and the top fans wouldn't. Fans that use oil or grease in their bearings would seep out faster. Ball and double ball bearing fans don't have this problem though.
 

Colif

Win 11 Master
Moderator
there is no good solution then. Just the best you can do.

I would put AIO on front anyway even if it reduces its life length, better than not being able to use GPU because it cooks CPU. use intake fans as exhaust

FD Meshify S2, size seemed like a good idea at time, smaller meshify too small.
 
Dec 8, 2021
19
0
10
0
The problem is caused by all the air coming out of the 3080 being sucked into AIO since its above the GPU in case.

that seems to be a problem.
How fast do the intakes run as they only thing stopping the heat going right into aio?

I have increased all the fan speeds of my case fans already. Still not much improvement or if at all.

So you are saying that the high cpu temperatures I am experiencing is due to my graphics card being below it? Then how come I see so many tech gurus and other people having their AIO's top mounted aswell? They also state it is the best orientation to have the aios top mounted because it will increase pump life etc. Some have done tests comparing top mount vs front mount and it their results only came to a 1*C difference. So I'm wondering why am I experiencing this hotter CPU temperatures than normal?
 

Colif

Win 11 Master
Moderator
Maybe its put up top in videos because it looks good and cause its what everyone else does

his video shows 10c difference just having AIO above GPU

Design of GPU can come into play. if its a blower style card that exhausts out rear, temps don't change a lot. As your card exhausts its heat into the case, and that gets sucked into aio since heat rises as well, your CPU temps rise.
 
Last edited:
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