Question How to know if my PSU is dead?

sahgon

Commendable
Nov 16, 2016
10
0
1,510
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Lately my pc started turning off when playing a game (cs go if you ask, but my pc is too freaking useless even for this game) and I noticed my GPU being burning at 100 C. So, the last time I opened the game, my pc turned off completely. I cleared all the dust because that was the reason of the high temperatures. But then, my pc kept on rebooting every 2 seconds, so it couldn't even reach the boot code showing on the screen. I tried removing battery from mobo, ram and then placing them back. Then, I did the same for gpu and it opened and GPU temperatures were fine.

Next day though, my pc, every time I booted it, in the best case, it could hardly stay on for one or two seconds after Welcome screen and desktop, then crash.

After this, I thought it was the gpu, so I removed it. But it was rebooting every 3 seconds.

I disconnected, cpu fans, rams, bla bla and replaced them but nothing.
Then I disconnected the cable from the PSU to the CPU, so no power to CPU, and the fans kept working like it booted just fine without stopping and starting again.(yea i know it didn't really boot without a CPU). Any ideas?

Intel core 2 duo e 8400 3 ghz
mobo : GA-X38-DO0
GPU: PALET NVIDIA GTS 250
POWER SUPLY: OZT 650 W
RAM: KINGSTON HYPER X 1 GB DDR2 * 4

No parts have ever been overclocked.
I can hear the beep from the mobo. I don't think the sound is different from other times. But I can record the sound and upload it on YouTube so someone can check it if it's useful.


Thanks in adcance!
 
Last edited:
You can check the PSU by using some tools, but you must be competent/experienced doing all this.

BTW, software cannot be trusted to test PSU voltages. Only a DMM can, digital multimeters. Also, if you can find a "Kil-A-Watt"/power meter, etc. (from some hardware store) plug your system into that and see how much it's pulling under full load. Balance that with the age of the PSU and you can decide if you need a new one or not.

Some recommend using oscilloscope or any dedicated power supply analyzer, but these might be expensive, imo. Also check this instrument, Dr. Power. They don't actually provide a full range of loads. and they don't test for ripple either. But they can definitely tell if a PSU is dead, and/or missing a voltage, but they cannot conclusively tell you a supply is good. This is just for reference. I've not used any of these though.

We also have one digital LCD tester as shown below.








 

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