Question how to save files on hdd and open on ssd?

Grealish01

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good evening, I wanted to know if it is possible to save files on hdd and then open them with another memory device such as an SSD (so as not to pay attention to the speed of the device on which the files are stored but to the speed of the device that only serves to open temporarily the files) and I ask you if by doing this the reading and writing times are actually attributable to the SSD, or in any case to the type of memory from which the file is opened and not to the type of memory on which it is saved, I hope I am explained. because if i decide to open files saved on hdd on a ssd it is because i actually want all the performance and loading times that ssd gives me.
 

kanewolf

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good evening, I wanted to know if it is possible to save files on hdd and then open them with another memory device such as an SSD (so as not to pay attention to the speed of the device on which the files are stored but to the speed of the device that only serves to open temporarily the files) and I ask you if by doing this the reading and writing times are actually attributable to the SSD, or in any case to the type of memory from which the file is opened and not to the type of memory on which it is saved, I hope I am explained. because if i decide to open files saved on hdd on a ssd it is because i actually want all the performance and loading times that ssd gives me.
It is possible to setup an SSD as a cache. A file is written to the SSD. Then it is written to a second storage device. IF you access the file soon enough (before it is purged and the space used for something else) you can get the speed benefit of the SSD. This was common when SSDs were 32GB or with the Optane devices. SSDs are large enough and cheap enough today, that SSDs are not used as cache devices in typical configurations.
 
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USAFRet

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good evening, I wanted to know if it is possible to save files on hdd and then open them with another memory device such as an SSD (so as not to pay attention to the speed of the device on which the files are stored but to the speed of the device that only serves to open temporarily the files) and I ask you if by doing this the reading and writing times are actually attributable to the SSD, or in any case to the type of memory from which the file is opened and not to the type of memory on which it is saved, I hope I am explained. because if i decide to open files saved on hdd on a ssd it is because i actually want all the performance and loading times that ssd gives me.
No.

If it lives on the HDD, that is where it will be read from. At the speed of the HDD.
 
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WarWolverineWarrior

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Install OS on SSD, use HDD as slow storage. OS will "page" or cache files on SSD when conserving RAM usage. Your OS constantly writes/reads files to/from your C drive. If you chose to install a game on HDD, that game will load as fast as the Read time of that HDD.
 

Grealish01

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It is possible to setup an SSD as a cache. A file is written to the SSD. Then it is written to a second storage device. IF you access the file soon enough (before it is purged and the space used for something else) you can get the speed benefit of the SSD. This was common when SSDs were 32GB or with the Optane devices. SSDs are large enough and cheap enough today, that SSDs are not used as cache devices in typical configurations.
so the fact of putting a certain file happens automatically (ie the SDD does it)? Or can I decide which file to store on the SSD caches to make it open faster?
 

kanewolf

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so the fact of putting a certain file happens automatically (ie the SDD does it)? Or can I decide which file to store on the SSD caches to make it open faster?
Ths SSD cache is a combination of hardware and software (driver). It happens without the OS knowing it is happening. It happens at the device driver level. You have to CREATE the storage volume in the Intel RST software (or AMD equivalent) with the SSD as a cache. The driver writes to the SSD and to the backing storage.
As I said, it happens at the volume level (C: ) for example. You don't get to control what stays in cache, that is done automatically.
 
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Grealish01

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Ths SSD cache is a combination of hardware and software (driver). It happens without the OS knowing it is happening. It happens at the device driver level. You have to CREATE the storage volume in the Intel RST software (or AMD equivalent) with the SSD as a cache. The driver writes to the SSD and to the backing storage.
As I said, it happens at the volume level (C: ) for example. You don't get to control what stays in cache, that is done automatically.
Thanks all of you.
So if i do it manually can i direct use 200mb of cache for a file / app i want?
 

Grealish01

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Also, what drives are you working with?
Make/model, please.
the build will be:
CPU: Intel core i5 12600k
Motherboard: Asus prime z690-p wi fi (ddr4)
RAM: Crucial ballistix 3200 2x8gb ddr4
CASE: Silverstone fara m1 atx
GPU: (for the moment I have not bought it, maybe I will wait for the release of the Intel gpu and see what to do)
 

kanewolf

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the build will be:
CPU: Intel core i5 12600k
Motherboard: Asus prime z690-p wi fi (ddr4)
RAM: Crucial ballistix 3200 2x8gb ddr4
CASE: Silverstone fara m1 atx
GPU: (for the moment I have not bought it, maybe I will wait for the release of the Intel gpu and see what to do)
Then follow the advice given. Buy a large enough SSD to store the files that are important. Getting a SATA 2.5inch SSD that is larger, but the same price as a smaller SSD, will provide all the benefits even if it doesn't benchmark as fast. There are no real-world differences between SATA and NVMe in 99.9% of the use-cases.
 
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USAFRet

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the build will be:
CPU: Intel core i5 12600k
Motherboard: Asus prime z690-p wi fi (ddr4)
RAM: Crucial ballistix 3200 2x8gb ddr4
CASE: Silverstone fara m1 atx
GPU: (for the moment I have not bought it, maybe I will wait for the release of the Intel gpu and see what to do)
And storage devices?

Solid state is cheap enough now to not have HDD at all.

Except for my NAS and the large movie library and other archival storage, all my house systems are SSD only.
 

Grealish01

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And storage devices?

Solid state is cheap enough now to not have HDD at all.

Except for my NAS and the large movie library and other archival storage, all my house systems are SSD only.
I take SSD nvme m.2 pcie 4.0 256gb (Windows the only game I play) + SSD 500gb for writing, specifically programming with visual studio and 3D design with Blender and file storage that I reuse. In this regard, as @kanewolf said the 500gb SSD (I use programming and design) is it better to take it SATA in your opinion? or nvme?
 

kanewolf

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I take SSD nvme m.2 pcie 4.0 256gb (Windows the only game I play) + SSD 500gb for writing, specifically programming with visual studio and 3D design with Blender and file storage that I reuse. In this regard, as @kanewolf said the 500gb SSD (I use programming and design) is it better to take it SATA in your opinion? or nvme?
For use with Blender and visual studio, I would think that 32GB RAM should be a higher priority than storage.
I wouldn't spend any extra money on a PCIe 4.0 NVMe drive. You will get ZERO benefit.
 
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Grealish01

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Regarding different SSD and 'rendering' time...I'm in the middle of writing up a test with various speed of SSD.
PCIe 4.0, PCIe 3.0, SATA III SSD.

Rendering out video and Lightroom photos....ZERO difference.
Yes, really.

Concentrate on more RAM vs SSD speed.
ok i just ask for confirmation because from some tests i saw that ssd with pcie 4.0 go faster than sata, so should i buy a sata ssd for gaming, programming and design? thanks for your availability is a topic in which I have never gone into
 

USAFRet

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ok i just ask for confirmation because from some tests i saw that ssd with pcie 4.0 go faster than sata, so should i buy a sata ssd for gaming, programming and design? thanks for your availability is a topic in which I have never gone into
Yes, the benchmarks are very much faster.
Actual user facing difference, not so much.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4YoRKQy-UO4

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4DKLA7w9eeA

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQ9LyNXpsOo
 

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