Question i7-9750H never reach max turbo freq. 4.5Ghz

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Sep 18, 2019
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Wow, throttling on a single core... By the way, where's the HWINFO SS of the single core run? The SS of the single core results is in the first pic, the other 3 are from your all core run.

The Thermal Grizzy brand is of poor value, but if you really care about a 1-2C edge, go for it.
1. The results at pictures might be little confusing. First I start 6core stress test and than single core test. So max values are from both single and 6core test. I 've made one more single core test and there was throtling at 3 cores. It looks like thread is jumping from core to core.

2. What do You thing about this application of liquid metal. There is a gain 20 deg. C.
View: https://youtu.be/hdTsra-uLBI?t=429

Although this laptop has normal thermal paste reseller offers application of liquid metal at new laptops as well as requested. So maybe I should go for it?
 

Phaaze88

Admirable
Herald
Ok, so it did run single core, but it switched cores... but each one throttled.


Liquid metal works pretty good IF DONE CORRECTLY.
Choose to have the LM application done ONLY if the reseller offers to cover you for any damages caused by the LM. 2 things can happen if it's done incorrectly.
1)Dead cpu - LM is electrically conductive, so if ANY comes into contact with one of the transistors(?) bordering the processor die, the cpu is as good as done.
2)Having to do multiple reapplications. If done right the first time, it will last the lifetime of the laptop.
How to know if wasn't done correctly? You'll notice over time the cpu getting warmer and warmer under load.
 
Reactions: PC Tailor
Sep 1, 2019
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1.If it is a gaming laptop sure it has proprietary control center where you can choose between profiles like: Performance, turbo, silent, manual .try to play with them.

2.If you are using windows mode do not use slider, but right click on battery icon > power options and there select high performance.

3.Your cpu is getting hot. Try to undervolt it , -0.105 V usually stable for this cpu, although mine is stable even at -0.125 V, my temps are max 70°C ±2 in stress test ( room temp 22-24°c).

4. 3.9- 4.0GHz is ok when gaming or stresstesting, you'll get 4.2-4.4GHz only when it is "idle".
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
The easiest way to see if you can get 4.5GHz on a single thread is with Prime95 small fft. You can load up just 1 worker (1 worker = 1 thread). At the load screen make sure AVX / AVX2 is checked/disabled.

Higher frequency = more work = higher heat. So you only get maximum boost on 1 core. With 2 cores, cpu gets hotter, so automatically downgrades the boost to prevent overheating. Same with 3+ cores.

Changing Tim or cooling solution doesn't change this behavior, it's part of the firmware. Laptop bios doesn't allow all core OC at max boost because you cannot change the cooler, it has a limited capacity for heat dissipation.

The turbo is linked to AC power, you'll only see 25w when plugged in, on battery you'll run at 15w. This is where heat plays a vital role, because the laptop isn't powered by AC, it's still powered by the battery, supplemented by the charger. It's the battery that gets hot and slowly drains. What you'll find is that under seriously heavy usage, after a while the battery gets to critical condition, it's almost a fully uncharged battery. At that point, the laptop will cut back to 15w usage, fps goes in the toilet and cpu goes into power saving mode. Because it's the battery overheating after massive, fast discharge, not the cpu overheating.

So bios won't allow full locked core turbo in an effort to save the battery from overheating and exploding.

Playing stock minecraft you'll see @4.4GHz, it's a simple game, single threaded. Playing GTA5 you'll see 4.0GHz because it's 8 thread optimized running on 6 threads. The speeds will change according to exactly which game you play, and nothing will change that.

Fan pads and other external coolers don't cool the cpu. They cool the battery. Batteries are more power efficient when cooler, so the length of time it'll handle heavy usage corresponds to its temp as AC power tries to keep the battery charged. A hot battery will drain faster, you go into power saving mode faster. Most ppl see it as the cpu overheating, it's not, it's the battery affecting running power.

The battery heat also affects the cooling of the cpu, and vice versa, the heatsink getting very hot with excess wattage dissipation is also heating up the battery and a hot battery affects the cpu ability to stay cool, lowering its range of capacity. By cooling the battery, the cpu heatsink isn't as much affected, so has greater dissipation ability, cpu stays cooler under load.
 
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