Question I7 9750h temp question

May 26, 2020
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Hello, I recently got a i7 9750h laptop. When I run PUBG, my cpu mostly run at 75-80 degrees, but when I check CPU-ID I can see that my max temp was 99 on package and high 90s on cores.

I have undervolted to -0.125 and set all cores to Max of 40 on throttlestop.

Is this normal?
 

Vyrvelata

Upstanding
May 19, 2020
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Well it's a laptop packed with really power hungry CPU (maybe GPU as well), It's not uncommon for a laptop to have such a high temperature, especially for such a CPU. How old is the Laptop... What model it is?
 
May 26, 2020
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Well it's a laptop packed with really power hungry CPU (maybe GPU as well), It's not uncommon for a laptop to have such a high temperature, especially for such a CPU. How old is the Laptop... What model it is?
Thank you for the reply. The laptop is only a week old and it is an HP Omen 15 with rtx 2060, i7 9750h, 1tb m2, 16 GB ram.

The temp seems fine for the most part, but it har short stutters up to 99C and when I check my limits in throttlestop I Get yellow warnings for thermal, pl1 and pl2.
 

Vyrvelata

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May 19, 2020
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Thank you for the reply. The laptop is only a week old and it is an HP Omen 15 with rtx 2060, i7 9750h, 1tb m2, 16 GB ram.

The temp seems fine for the most part, but it har short stutters up to 99C and when I check my limits in throttlestop I Get yellow warnings for thermal, pl1 and pl2.
Yeah not the best chassis, for that Power Hungry setup :(



I remember a few years back there was some hungry i7 CPU in horrible C660 Toshiba chassis :(
After 6 months the guy had constant cpu throttling... so he wrote in the official Toshiba forum explaining everything and after some back and forward, they simply advised him to limit CPU Load in Windows to 35%. How can this be real, they sell me i7 in a chassis i can use 35% of it after some point, why just don't limit that chassis to i3's ( the reason is money ofcourse).
But it's brain bending... what the brands are doing.... they are putting insane parts in horrible chassis... and it seems like they are getting away with it.

All i can say its a really bad choice of a chassis (cheap as well) for such a powerful configuration :( .
All i can add for now is find a really good laptop cooling pad...if something come to my mind like modding and stuff i would write... but also bad part is .... the laptop is under warranty so there is not so much you can do about it.
 
May 26, 2020
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I am tempted to try to exchange for a new PC and see if the paste is the problem. If i hit Max temps already now, I Wonder what temps will be in a year. Have bought a kryonaut paste, but it seems stupid to repaste a Brand new machine and null warranty.
 

Vyrvelata

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May 19, 2020
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I am tempted to try to exchange for a new PC and see if the paste is the problem. If i hit Max temps already now, I Wonder what temps will be in a year. Have bought a kryonaut paste, but it seems stupid to repaste a Brand new machine and null warranty.
Well it might be the paste but in the future it will start to overheat constantly while gaming.
I would always recommend PC always ...if your not traveling that much and it's not a "must" to have laptop.
 
May 26, 2020
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Well it might be the paste but in the future it will start to overheat constantly while gaming.
I would always recommend PC always ...if your not traveling that much and it's not a "must" to have laptop.
Yes I know, but for me its very practical. I talked to the store. First they were like «100 degrees is normal». But when I explained more they agreed to apply thermal paste themselves, so I will bring my kryonaut paste to them. Will run some bench test on all stock settings with maybe slight undervolt and then try again with new paste.
 

Phaaze88

Splendid
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I see this a lot, but why is thermal paste the 1st suspect in these scenarios?
Thermal paste plays a minor role in cooling - if it hasn't dried out, which takes at least a couple of years...

How can this be real, they sell me i7 in a chassis i can use 35% of it after some point, why just don't limit that chassis to i3's ( the reason is money ofcourse).
But it's brain bending... what the brands are doing.... they are putting insane parts in horrible chassis... and it seems like they are getting away with it.
This is really the peoples' fault more than the manufacturers'.
"People want to have their cake and eat it too.", or they want to 'dine at a steakhouse at fast food prices' - things like that.
Well, like it or not, compromises/sacrifices need to be made.

The laptop's purpose is mobility - a home/office PC on the go. Lightweight, cool, power efficient, quiet, and affordable.
Then along came the 'genius' idea of gaming on them - they were terrible at first; hardware was too weak...
People demanded more, and they got more - of everything: Heavy, hot, high power consuming, loud, and expensive.
It wasn't enough, the ideal gaming laptop should be light, cool, power efficient, quiet, and affordable, while still being a power house. That combination is realistically not possible without some kind of compromise.

Without dragging on: there's only so much power that can be crammed under such a tiny hood and not have issues.
The cheaper gaming laptops are not worth it. The heavier, more expensive models with less of the plastic junk are the better ones.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Dried out paste isn't an issue, until it is. The liquid part of the paste isn't really a conductor. It's just a medium for the silicates and other minerals etc that are the conductors. So when the 'paste' finally dries out, it doesn't change what's doing all the work of the thermal conductivity. The bad part is that once dried, it's almost like a really brittle rock, the smallest vibrations or hard knocks will seperate the seal and the 'paste' basically turns to dust. Buh bye cooling.

Pastes like Arctic Silver 5 should never be used in a laptop, 200ish heatcyles and it's done.
 
May 26, 2020
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Not sure if its true or not but the vendor said to me that the stock thermal paste often is old and of low quality. Hope to see a decrease in load temps after repaste. Seems like a ripoff if I pay for a premium cpu and end up clocking it down just go get OK temps.
 
Reactions: Karadjgne
May 26, 2020
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So the vendor said; everything is within spec and refused to apply thermal paste for me.

I have a friend that is a tech geek who helped my apply the paste.

The results are in, my idle temp is down from 45-50 to 35-40 and my gaming temps went down from 100 degrees with much throttle to a solid 83 max with the same settings. That means 15-20 degrees colder gaming temps.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
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Cpu/gpu paste is silk-screened. Literally a small box with a silk bottom is positioned on the chip, bunch of paste dumped in and then scraped off, leaving a fine coating of paste on the entire die/IHS.

There's nothing saying this is done perfectly or evenly as it's done by hand, not machine. There's also nothing saying the paste itself is good, effective, half dried out and old etc. There's some quality control, but it's not anything that's considered of vital importance. Ask anyone about how well Intel applies paste underneath the IHS, it's why many people are quite happy to delid and do it better.

Vendor was correct, your laptop is within spec. It's not his fault the specs are somewhat broad in range and differ from your expectations. If you were idling at super high temps, that'd be one thing, but games are considered extreme use, not normal use, so high temps are an expected fact that overrides normal use specs.

If a car is rated to get 20mpg around town and you get 10mpg because you jump on the gas and hot-rod it constantly, that's not unexpected nor is it the manufactures problem. Your driving is out of spec, not the motors expected normal driving 20mpg.

But it's great you got temps to drop that much, good job on the repaste 👍
 
Last edited:
Reactions: figuz89

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