[SOLVED] i9 10850K Long & Short Duration Power Limit?

Jan 19, 2021
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Hello all,

I saw the power settings inside the BIOS. Are these settings normal? Or should I make both settings 125W?

 
This is normal. Long power max = PL1, short power max = PL2. They are set about right, but unless you have a specific reason to mess around with them, just leave them at default.

I would turn on Intel Turbo boost max technology, though.

Here's a brief description from Techpowerup:

  • PL1 is the processor's rated TDP value, which defines the long-duration power limit the processor must not exceed; it's set to 125 W for both the i9-10850K and i9-10900K. All components in the system must be able to handle that heat/power draw continuously.
  • PL2 is the key for Turbo Boost 2.0 to function. It allows the processor to exceed PL1 for a short duration—when it leaves the idle state. The idea behind this is that the cooling solution is designed to handle 125 W (PL1) of continuous heat around the clock. With the whole system cool, there's a certain time the processor can run safely at higher power draw—while everything heats up. Think of heat being water that accumulates in a leaky bucket. If the bucket is empty, you can fill it up very quickly without making it spill. The value of PL2 is the maximum power that can be used in that state—it's set to 250 W for both CPUs.
  • Tau is the duration PL2 can run for—56 seconds on both processors.
  • PL3 and PL4 aren't relevant here as they are super-short bursts of just a few milliseconds.
The widely accepted assumption is that you are able to run the processor 56 seconds for up to 250 W before it will drop to 125 W. Our data shows that this is not the case. Rather, there seems to be a certain amount of total energy (Energy = Power x Time) that can be used while boosting, and once that budget is exhausted, the TDP limit will activate.
 
Last edited:
This is normal. Long power max = PL1, short power max = PL2. They are set about right, but unless you have a specific reason to mess around with them, just leave them at default.

I would turn on Intel Turbo boost max technology, though.

Here's a brief description from Techpowerup:

  • PL1 is the processor's rated TDP value, which defines the long-duration power limit the processor must not exceed; it's set to 125 W for both the i9-10850K and i9-10900K. All components in the system must be able to handle that heat/power draw continuously.
  • PL2 is the key for Turbo Boost 2.0 to function. It allows the processor to exceed PL1 for a short duration—when it leaves the idle state. The idea behind this is that the cooling solution is designed to handle 125 W (PL1) of continuous heat around the clock. With the whole system cool, there's a certain time the processor can run safely at higher power draw—while everything heats up. Think of heat being water that accumulates in a leaky bucket. If the bucket is empty, you can fill it up very quickly without making it spill. The value of PL2 is the maximum power that can be used in that state—it's set to 250 W for both CPUs.
  • Tau is the duration PL2 can run for—56 seconds on both processors.
  • PL3 and PL4 aren't relevant here as they are super-short bursts of just a few milliseconds.
The widely accepted assumption is that you are able to run the processor 56 seconds for up to 250 W before it will drop to 125 W. Our data shows that this is not the case. Rather, there seems to be a certain amount of total energy (Energy = Power x Time) that can be used while boosting, and once that budget is exhausted, the TDP limit will activate.
 
Last edited:
Jan 19, 2021
8
1
15
0
This is normal. Long power max = PL1, short power max = PL2. They are set about right, but unless you have a specific reason to mess around with them, just leave them at default.

I would turn on Intel Turbo boost max technology, though.

Here's a brief description from Techpowerup:

  • PL1 is the processor's rated TDP value, which defines the long-duration power limit the processor must not exceed; it's set to 125 W for both the i9-10850K and i9-10900K. All components in the system must be able to handle that heat/power draw continuously.
  • PL2 is the key for Turbo Boost 2.0 to function. It allows the processor to exceed PL1 for a short duration—when it leaves the idle state. The idea behind this is that the cooling solution is designed to handle 125 W (PL1) of continuous heat around the clock. With the whole system cool, there's a certain time the processor can run safely at higher power draw—while everything heats up. Think of heat being water that accumulates in a leaky bucket. If the bucket is empty, you can fill it up very quickly without making it spill. The value of PL2 is the maximum power that can be used in that state—it's set to 250 W for both CPUs.
  • Tau is the duration PL2 can run for—56 seconds on both processors.
  • PL3 and PL4 aren't relevant here as they are super-short bursts of just a few milliseconds.
The widely accepted assumption is that you are able to run the processor 56 seconds for up to 250 W before it will drop to 125 W. Our data shows that this is not the case. Rather, there seems to be a certain amount of total energy (Energy = Power x Time) that can be used while boosting, and once that budget is exhausted, the TDP limit will activate.
Thank you. These settings are default settings. I did not make any changes. So I leave it like this.
 
Yes, that's a good idea. You can use PL1/PL2 in certain programs to make processor Overclock, or undervolt. But as I mentioned, unless you have a specific reason to do those things, leaving at stock, your CPU is still one of the best performing CPU's around right now.
 
Reactions: Phaaze88
Jan 19, 2021
8
1
15
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Don't forget about this :)
Thank you :) i will enable it, I think turning this setting on provides a more stable performance right? By the way, i am using HWiNFO64 and I saw that the maximum voltage is (reached,not everytime) 1.4. But usually around 1.35. Isn't that quite normal?
 
Yes, it might bring stability. But, it will most certainly give higher CPU boosts, on one or two cores which will be nice.

In terms of voltage, yes. Often the CPU voltage will shoot up if monitoring during a CPU load. Most of the time, it's literally for a split second. Then it goes back to it's normal range. This can happen frequently, but is nothing to worry about. This is normal for modern CPU's with multiple cores.
 
Reactions: Phaaze88
Jan 19, 2021
8
1
15
0
Yes, it might bring stability. But, it will most certainly give higher CPU boosts, on one or two cores which will be nice.

In terms of voltage, yes. Often the CPU voltage will shoot up if monitoring during a CPU load. Most of the time, it's literally for a split second. Then it goes back to it's normal range. This can happen frequently, but is nothing to worry about. This is normal for modern CPU's with multiple cores.
Thank you for your interest. You explained everything clearly :)
 
Reactions: keith12

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