[SOLVED] installed a i9 10900 stock cooler an its hitting 98 degrees max when running cinebench?

Oct 19, 2020
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I just installed a i9 10900 (non k) in my dell xps 8940 , sold my i7 10700 (non k) for it just for extra computing power but i just put new thermal paste with the stock cooler and its hitting very high temps when under full load and it ends up obviously thermal throttling. Just wondering obviously this is 100% usage worst case scenario during that benchmark w/ a stock cooler so not much expected with a stock cooler but does anyone know if its supposed to be running that hot? i get it's 10 cores but that seems excessive i put sufficient thermal compound so i dont think its the spread of the thermal paste im just wondering if anyone has any fixes to this problem besides getting a new cooler like an aio or something i wanted to keep the stock cooler? or is this how its just going to have to be? if anyone has similar experience or knows of a solution while keeping the stock cooler please drop it in the comments much appreciated!.
 
Intel's tdp is measured at the base clock. Lock your cpu to the base clock by disabling turbo, and it will run fine on a 65w cooler, but with much lower performance.

With turbo enabled (it is by default) the cpu draws and outputs much more than 65w, so a 65w cooler can't keep up.

For example, the i9 10900k is a 125w part but draws well over 300w under load with turbo enabled for example.

The non k will certainly have lower power consumption and heat output, but it will definitely exceed 65w, (probably closer to 175w If I had to guess) and again can't be cooled by a 65w cooler.
 
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Oct 19, 2020
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I bought this pc from microcenter, its a dell cooler im assuming it has screw down points instead of the normal pushpin and turn to lock that came with the cpu, it looks beefier than the intel cooler in general that came with the i9 10900 but the pushpin is not fitting into the dell mobo so im forced to use the cooler the computer came with at the start. But i understand the throttling, it would hit 4.8-4.9 then drop to 3.9 once hitting 93+ degrees. I'm just trying to think of a solution to atleast keep it at bay at 90 o and below.
 
The cooler the dell comes with does look more substantial than the stock cooler, however it still looks smaller than a $20 tower cooler. I would think it's cooling capacity is the issue.

One thing you could do is put an aftermarket CPU cooler on it.

Given my experiences with Dell oem boards and what you have said, you can't just install an aftermarket cooler like normal.

First, consider the max height of cooler that you can install into the system. You may have to measure this.

Then once you buy a cooler, before you install it, you have to remove the stock cooler and backplate which is not as easy as it sounds, if your system is like the dell systems I have used in the past.

The only way to upgrade the cpu cooler is to remove the current cpu cooler and remove the motherboard from the chassis. Flip the motherboard over you will see backplate that is used for the stock cooler Dell uses. This backplate is affixed with adhesive tape to the reverse of the cpu retention mechanism. You would have to heat up the backplate and the adhesive tape holding on the backplate on the reverse of the board, then gently pry it off with your fingers. I typically have use a hairdryer for this.

I would assume you may be able to run something like fishing line in between the back of the cpu retention mechanism and the backplate to cut the tape, but I have not tried this personally.

This sounds more complex than it really is, I have done it several times successfully.

Then any aftermarket cooler or even the Intel stock cooler would be able to be mounted.
 
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Oct 19, 2020
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thats the thing though, its 65w tdp not as power hungry as the i9 10900(K) this is the non- k version, then again i didnt monitor the i7 10700 cpu temps while running the same benchmark for all i know it was probably the same temp but i guess the cooler will have to be upgraded by removing this mobo in this newly designed (20L) case will be the end of me its almost fully enclosed in metal and rivets id have to really piece this puzzle together to maneuver this thing out of the case. I just thought it being such a low tdp it wouldnt be hitting these crazy temps but alas i was wrong i guess lmao. I still don't get why include such a cooler if in it's workload of the chip itself it can surpass the cooler very easily atleast if your selling a 450-650$ chip include a 40$ cooler would be so nice instead of including the same pos cooler for the past 10 years lmao.
 
Intel's tdp is measured at the base clock. Lock your cpu to the base clock by disabling turbo, and it will run fine on a 65w cooler, but with much lower performance.

With turbo enabled (it is by default) the cpu draws and outputs much more than 65w, so a 65w cooler can't keep up.

For example, the i9 10900k is a 125w part but draws well over 300w under load with turbo enabled for example.

The non k will certainly have lower power consumption and heat output, but it will definitely exceed 65w, (probably closer to 175w If I had to guess) and again can't be cooled by a 65w cooler.
 
Reactions: averagemortgage96
Oct 19, 2020
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appreciate the help, im going to look for oem after market coolers that will fit on the board without having to heat up and remove that back plate (if) one even exists. And if not i will just either have to do what you explained or live with it.
 

Zerk2012

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appreciate the help, im going to look for oem after market coolers that will fit on the board without having to heat up and remove that back plate (if) one even exists. And if not i will just either have to do what you explained or live with it.
His watts are way off but this will help you understand.

 
My numbers for the nonk are guesswork, but the numbers for the 10900k are accurate. Underestimating if anything.

To find the power limit associated with our chip paired with the Gigabyte Aorus Z490 Master motherboard, we ran a few Prime95 tests with AVX enabled (small FFT). During those tests, we recorded up to 332W of power consumption when paired with either the Corsair H115i 280mm AIO watercooler or a Noctua NH-D15S air cooler. Yes, that's with the processor configured at stock settings.
https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/intel-core-i9-10900k-cpu-review/2

It depends on the motherboard, but in many cases the power draw is indeed 300+ watts.

Just like the tdp, the power limits do not mean much.
 

Zerk2012

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My numbers for the nonk are guesswork, but the numbers for the 10900k are

It depends on the motherboard, but in many cases the power draw is indeed 300+ watts.

Just like the tdp, the power limits do not mean much.
I really just hope he got the upgraded power supply. Those models come with 350 and 500 watts.

I seen several different reviews on the 10900k and their about all different. Some have the 300 watt peak for just a few ms some have it longer, and some dont list it at all.

https://www.techpowerup.com/review/intel-core-i9-10900k/18.html

The heat displacement is better than the older processors also I have a Cryorig R1 Universal and my temps are better on my 10600K@ 4.8 than my old 4790K was @ 4.6.
 

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