Intel HDCP Cracked Using $350 Hardware Kit

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amk-aka-Phantom

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Good, good. The whole marketing of this HDCP feature as profitable for the user (see image below) sickens me, as does the feature itself. I don't agree with implementing copy protection on hardware level. This might not be fully usable yet, but the effort is already there. I love seeing expensive copy protection systems meant to limit the users go to waste.

 
lawl serves intel right. they're inflating this thing by adding 'security-critical systems used by law enforcement agencies and the military' into hdcp. are the military and law enforcement agencies part of riaa and mpaa who [strike]bribed[/strike] financially endorsed this tech for intel to implement this tech in the first place? nope.
 

doorspawn

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The graphics card: 1) decodes the HDCP data, 2) decompresses it, 3) re-encodes it.
Then it's captured by this MitM attack and decoded.

It seems to me there's a far superior workaround between 1 & 2 waiting to be developed.
 

keyanf

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If Patton lived today, he'd likely add "copy protection" to his "Fixed fortifications are a monument to the stupidity of man" quote.
 

icepick314

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still funny to see millions of research and development in DRM cracked by mere few dollars...

remember the Sony's music CD protection defeated by just a piece of tape or even a sharpie marker?
 
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@doorspawn

actually if i recall correctly and i maybe wrong, HDMI has a hardware layer, all devices that connect via HDMI is required to implement hardware layer, if i recall the HDCP data never gets trans-coded but rather transmitted as is along with the copy protected material over the HDMI protocol, the receiving device not the transmitting device will then authenticate the HDCP data, what this device does is intercepts the copy protected material and using the master key strips out the copy protection resulting in a stream that is completely copy protected free

it should also be noted that the hardened pirates will have access to TBs of hard disk space as well as machine with hardware accelerated video capture and trans coding devices, large amount of data was rarely ever a deterrent
 

kinggremlin

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[citation][nom]doorspawn[/nom]The graphics card: 1) decodes the HDCP data, 2) decompresses it, 3) re-encodes it.Then it's captured by this MitM attack and decoded.It seems to me there's a far superior workaround between 1 & 2 waiting to be developed.[/citation]

Of course there is. As was noted in the article by the developers of this, it has no practical use for pirates. Despite all the ROFLCOPTER $ony OWNED idiocy in the comments, this has nothing to do with copying Bluray movies. No one would use a method like this for copying movies. If you can't afford $10 movies, you can find all the movie rips you want for free at your local torrent site.

This crack has real security implications. Being able to tap secure corporate and military data transmissions creates a legitimate security concern. Gloating over something like this is plainly stupid. This hack serves no practical benefit to the consumer. Granted, since this is a physical hack the person would have to have direct access to the cable carrying the signal, but a real working example is cause for concern.
 

rosen380

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[citation][nom]wiyosaya[/nom]According to Engadget, it only cost $260.[/citation]

They might be quoting street price of the hardware while I believe engadget was quoting what they paid for it [a university discounted price]
 

ordcestus

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[citation][nom]kinggremlin[/nom]Of course there is. As was noted in the article by the developers of this, it has no practical use for pirates. Despite all the ROFLCOPTER $ony OWNED idiocy in the comments, this has nothing to do with copying Bluray movies. No one would use a method like this for copying movies. If you can't afford $10 movies, you can find all the movie rips you want for free at your local torrent site.This crack has real security implications. Being able to tap secure corporate and military data transmissions creates a legitimate security concern. Gloating over something like this is plainly stupid. This hack serves no practical benefit to the consumer. Granted, since this is a physical hack the person would have to have direct access to the cable carrying the signal, but a real working example is cause for concern.[/citation]
Fortunatly at least the military does not trust these sort of systems, we need to transfer data securely? We use fiber optic cables that can't be tapped without it being obvious.
 

koga73

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I've seen this sort of thing before with HDCP. The board in the middle acts as a compatible HDCP device, strips it out, and passes the signal through. The problem with it is the HDCP key blacklist. As soon as one of these devices comes out all Intel has to do is blacklist the key and it will no longer work with future content. If they have the master key however, they may be able to generate HDCP keys themselves.
 

jezus53

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[citation][nom]kinggremlin[/nom]Gloating over something like this is plainly stupid. This hack serves no practical benefit to the consumer.[/citation]

We're not gloating over it because it serves a benefit to the consumer. We're gloating over it because it shows that no matter how hard the try to prevent people from pirating, we will always find a way around it. Also, why the hell would the military be using HDMI cables? Seriously, they aren't a bunch of basement dwelling tech freaks. They just want the signal to go to the screen and that is it. I'm sure they still use VGA, but that aside, we all know this stuff was made to stop pirating, not for law enforcement and military protection. IF that was their concern then they would have just applied it to the products those areas purchase, not to the average everyday consumer.
 

ctmk

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[citation][nom]wiyosaya[/nom]According to Engadget, it only cost $260.[/citation]

and prices may go down if this thing is improved and mass produced. (if there is a market)
 

ctmk

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And we consumer bares all the cost for all this sh1t.


[citation][nom]custodian-1[/nom]this goes to a core belief if you try to lock it and no matter how. Soneone will take the time to unlock it[/citation]
 

torque79

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Consumers put up with far too much now. TV used to be as simple as plugging in a cable, poof it worked. Now you need a digital box with HDCP at both ends and an appropriate generation of HDMI cable for the functions you wish to use. Add an a/v receiver and things get even more complicated, including frequent and (extremely annoying) HDCP handshake issues with legitimate hardware. All of this does not benefit the consumer in any way, only making it all far more complicated and expensive. As the makers of this device point out, it's not terribly helpful to crack HDCP anyways. It does not DO anything beneficial, it only gets in the way of compatibility and simplicity for end users.

I hope someday consumers fight back and lash out against all this crap that's been forced down our throats.
 
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I'm a locksmith and I know all too well that no matter how complex the "lock" there is always a way to defeat it, bravo gentleman.
 

Camikazi

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[citation][nom]wiyosaya[/nom]According to Engadget, it only cost $260.[/citation]
The website I found where you can actually buy it say $350 normally and $200 for academic use.
 

Galgomite

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HDCP seems like a short-sighted way to go when everyone's already seen what happened in the music industry. Movie companies can't eliminate piracy, they can only make it more convenient to buy content legally.
 

hetneo

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[citation][nom]kinggremlin[/nom]Of course there is. As was noted in the article by the developers of this, it has no practical use for pirates. Despite all the ROFLCOPTER $ony OWNED idiocy in the comments, this has nothing to do with copying Bluray movies. No one would use a method like this for copying movies. If you can't afford $10 movies, you can find all the movie rips you want for free at your local torrent site.This crack has real security implications. Being able to tap secure corporate and military data transmissions creates a legitimate security concern. Gloating over something like this is plainly stupid. This hack serves no practical benefit to the consumer. Granted, since this is a physical hack the person would have to have direct access to the cable carrying the signal, but a real working example is cause for concern.[/citation]
Gloating is stupid by itself. But there are certain security concerns consumers have and it's better to know that something is not bullet proof than to believe wrongly otherwise.

Concerning corporation and military security, anyone saying that this is compromising them is either outright lying or just plain ignorant. Corporations and especially military do not use consumer grade protection, especially not HDCP which has no application in military, zero, none, zilch, nada.
 

eddieroolz

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I have not come across a time when HDCP has prevented me from doing what I would like to do, so I honestly don't see the big deal with HDCP. But either way, good development I guess?
 

torque79

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HDCP is the reason we were forced into HDMI and we are forced to keep upgrading to new HDMI standards. There's no reason component cables or HDMI v1 can't carry sufficient data for HD video and audio and 3d. It's just copper sheathed in rubber. As a result of forced new cabling standards for no reason, running wire in your walls becomes a huge hassle. In my HTPC to get new hd audio streaming or 3d video, all I need is a new video card. But as a result of HDCP, I'd need both a new HDMI cable between my HTPC and my a/v receiver, and also a new HDMI cable between the receiver and the video output device (projector/tv). There is no sudden development in new wiring technology coincidentally every time a new video resolution comes out, it's all garbage.
 
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