News Intel Raptor Lake CPUs May Support DDR5-5200 RAM Natively

Tom Sunday

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It may also blow up the prices of main boards and DDR5s.
Indeed we had a lot of problems in getting DDR5 recognized with a bevy of Z690 MB’s pushed into XMP and then only 2-modules in most cases running best and true to form! I am not really surprised that Intel in trying to fixing DDR5 compatibilities made it a seemingly priority in the upcoming Raptor Lake CPU’s and the almost imminently new MB arrivals. I myself cannot afford to playing in the garden of DDR5 and still enjoying the speed of DDR3 and as things used to be. But yet I wonder if DDR5-6400 as talked about here will be a really felt difference or visceral advantage over DDR5 5200? Besides the hefty pricing difference between the two the resellers may charge us? To me it has a feeling of the much talked about difference between a RTX 3090 and the 3090 TI! As some here on the channel earlier remarked: "Do not bother to buy, the difference in performance is not worth it!" Thoughts?
 
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InvalidError

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But yet I wonder if DDR5-6400 as talked about here will be a really felt difference or visceral advantage over DDR5 5200? Besides the hefty pricing difference between the two the resellers may charge us?
When DDR4 entered the mainstream starting with overpriced DDR4-2133 and ultra-expensive DDR4-2933, its advantages were disputable too. Fast-forward about four years, almost anything 3000 or less was priced about the same and most platforms that could overclock to 3000+MT/s showed decent scaling up to about 3200MT/s. Today, another three years later, pricing is pretty much flat for anything slower than 3200 and performance gains from faster memory are decent for the incremental price up to about 4000MT/s on CPUs that can run this speed without switching to higher clock ratios.

There may be little to no benefits to DDR5-5200 today just like there was little to no benefits to DDR4-2666 back when that was new. Give it four years and I have little doubt 5200 will start feeling inadequate just like DDR4-2666 did.
 
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zipspyder

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DDR4-2133 was the basement for DDR4 like DDR5-4400 is for DDR5.

DDR5-6400 as the "defacto mainstream grade" at some point in the future would be more comparable to DDR4-3200/3600 today.
Thanks, I was wondering what would equate to DDR4 3200 or something higher in DDR5...
 

peterf28

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I just decided to keep my i5 2500K@4.8GHz, 16GB DDR3 2133MHz, 1070TI for one more year. It can run everything at 75-55 FPS/Hz. The Freesync monitor I bought extended the lifespan of my system for another good 4 years. Everything runs fluently inside the Freesync range, I do not even notice when FPS drops thanks to Freesync.
 

jp7189

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Thanks, I was wondering what would equate to DDR4 3200 or something higher in DDR5...
It's really about absolute latency. DDR CAS latency measured in nanoseconds has been more or less the same for all generations. New generations tend to start off high and get better with time eventually settling around 8-10ns. DDR5 is currently around 16ns or roughly twice as slow as topend DDR4.

After DDR5 latency comes down to 10ns range the bandwidth benefits will make it a clear winner over DDR4.

Latency equals CAS/speed 2000 e.g. DDR4 3200 CL 16 is 16/32002000 or 10ns; DDR5 4800 CL 40 is 40/4800*2000 or 16.6ns.

DDR5-4800 CL 24 should have a small advantage. DDR5-6400 CL 32 is good stuff and is already available but it very expensive and not widely compatible with motherboards yet.
 
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