Intel Reveals 10nm+ Ice Lake Processors With Precious Few Details

Status
Not open for further replies.

Lazovski

Honorable
Jun 17, 2014
10
0
10,510
0
So where has Cannonlake gone to ?..
"And (W)inte(r)l gave Spring and Summer a miss and went straight on into Autumn."
 

none12345

Distinguished
Apr 27, 2013
431
2
18,785
0
"So we're finally here."

Not really... Coffee lake isnt out yet, let alone cannon lake, let alone ice lake. Tho cannon lake for mobile is suppose to be the first 10nm not ice lake.

Its more like they are finally getting close....but still haven't arrived at 10nm. 10nm is what 1.5 years late now, should be 2ish years late by the time it debouches for mobile chips(longer for desktop chips)

And yes, they are certainly working on 7nm already. And they are also likely working on 5nm as well. These things take a LONG time to develop, the industry starts working on the next 2 processes before the current one is finished.
 
I knew Intel was sitting on 10nm and IceLake waiting for competition, miking the current 14nm designs. The likely made many billions more so I don't blame them. We can thank AMD for the timing of this otherwise they would still be tweaking there 14nm parts next year.
 

zippyzion

Distinguished
Jan 23, 2012
114
0
18,680
0
@Jamessneed

Really? Because all the articles that I've read have cited difficulty with the 10nm fab process. Did you know that Kaby Lake was supposed to be 10nm?

https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2015/07/intel-confirms-tick-tock-shattering-kaby-lake-processor-as-moores-law-falters/

They had similar difficulty going from 22nm to 14nm as well. It seems that shrinking and packing transistors is a pretty hard thing to do. So much so that even Intel with its massive R&D team has had problems... errr sorry, difficulties. Intel never said problems, only difficulties.
 

bloodroses

Distinguished
Jan 27, 2013
677
15
19,165
56
@Jamessneed

Intel, if it could, would have released the 10nm fab process as quickly as possible. They ended up having difficulties though as zippyzion said (as with all process shrinks). It isn't from a performance standpoint, it's from the point that less material is used and more money is saved. A 10nm fab kaby would cost Intel less than a 14nm kaby; although the consumer would never notice that difference.
 

lsatenstein

Distinguished
Mar 8, 2012
77
0
18,630
0
All they are doing is shrinking the die, not improving instruction timing. An instruction requiring 10 clock cycles still needs 10 clock cycles.
What Intel has to do is get more parallelism in the instruction set, and stop requiring new mother boards because the socket has changed. And they need to price match Ryzen. When the price match, AMD will drop their prices somewhat, but Intel will still be ahead.

The only reason Intel is ahead is branding, and not a better product.
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador


And budget, and manufacturing capability, and agreements with vendors. And honestly they do have a better product for all things consumer. A cheap ultrabook processor and most people are all set. AMD alternatives have pretty much always used more juice.

Very much looking forward to the Ryzen/Vega APUs though. Might be useful for people who want a little more gaming. (I'm thinking HTPC myself, would like to remove the need for a discrete GPU for a 4K HDMI output)
 

computerguy72

Distinguished
Sep 22, 2011
190
1
18,690
1
Intel has beat 14nm to death with numerous process revisions, time to move along. I get squeezing as much profit out of a process as possible but Intel has brought that to a whole new level. So happy AMD causing Intel to finally move on down the road.
 

computerguy72

Distinguished
Sep 22, 2011
190
1
18,690
1
Intel has beat 14nm to death with numerous process revisions, time to move along. I get squeezing as much profit out of a process as possible but Intel has brought that to a whole new level. So happy AMD causing Intel to finally move on down the road.
 

TJ Hooker

Champion
Ambassador

Intel stayed on 14 nm this long because of difficulties with their 10 nm process. They didn't deliberately stay on 14 nm longer to milk it, and their move to 10 nm isn't a reaction to AMD.
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
And it isn't like those process nodes go away. They are used to make other Intel products for many years, getting their CPUs out of the production line frees them up to make more stuff. Usually the chipsets are done with the previous node. And things like Intel network cards, vPro chips, etc.
 

shaju.chacko

Prominent
Aug 17, 2017
2
0
510
0
Is the 8nm and 5nm further down not hitting the Moore's law ? is the yield justifiable commercially on a silicon die ?
 

shaju.chacko

Prominent
Aug 17, 2017
2
0
510
0
Is the 8nm and 5nm further down not hitting the Moore's law ? is the yield justifiable commercially on a silicon die ?
 

kawmic

Distinguished
Jan 5, 2013
10
0
18,510
0
Correct me if i'm wrong. Aren't Snapdragon already at 10nm, and working on 7nm? I know it's for smartphones, but if they can do it, the others should be able too, imo.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS