News Intel's 35W 8-Core 'Rocket Lake' T-Series CPUs Arrive, Just Not in the US

Thanks for the article ! I'm really interested in grabbing one of these low power CPUs for my new SFF PC. These shouldn't be costing that much though, but the main concern is the availability of these processors globally.
 

watzupken

Notable
Mar 16, 2020
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The question is how closely does the processors conform to the supposed 35W TDP. At this TDP, the base clock speed looks really crappy. Even 65W versions need at least double or more of the rates TDP to be able to achieve the advertised boost clock speed, so to get to the boost clock speed means you need a beefy cooler or let it throttle after a few seconds.
 
The question is how closely does the processors conform to the supposed 35W TDP. At this TDP, the base clock speed looks really crappy. Even 65W versions need at least double or more of the rates TDP to be able to achieve the advertised boost clock speed, so to get to the boost clock speed means you need a beefy cooler or let it throttle after a few seconds.
The "35W" is a lie. Intel's "low-power" versions of their i7 and i9 desktop processors draw up to 123 watts when boosting (This article is for Comet Lake, but the 11700T and 11900T have the same power limit)...


They are supposed to boost for up to 28 seconds, after which they would drop to those very low 1.5 / 2.0GHz base clocks. But realistically, the vast majority of motherboards will leave them boosting indefinitely by default, meaning these are actually 123W processors unless one goes out of their way to enable settings that will significantly cripple their performance.
 

spongiemaster

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Dec 12, 2019
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The "35W" is a lie. Intel's "low-power" versions of their i7 and i9 desktop processors draw up to 123 watts when boosting (This article is for Comet Lake, but the 11700T and 11900T have the same power limit)...


They are supposed to boost for up to 28 seconds, after which they would drop to those very low 1.5 / 2.0GHz base clocks. But realistically, the vast majority of motherboards will leave them boosting indefinitely by default, meaning these are actually 123W processors unless one goes out of their way to enable settings that will significantly cripple their performance.
You may be able to find some T series in retail, but they are basically OEM CPU's designed for SFF PC's like this one from Lenovo.



We have a few Dells systems at the company I work for that look very similar to this. These will absolutely not infinitely boost and there are no BIOS settings that will allow you to configure the system that way. The cooling in these was not designed for that. If you're tracking down a T series CPU and dropping it in an ATX Z series motherboard, you're doing it wrong.
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
For the money, it can make more sense to get the regular processor, set the power limit manually, and set the clock speeds similar to that of the T. Then when you want the extra power, it is there to be had.

I ran an i3-4130T for years as my HTPC, great, idled at like 18W. But the little dual core just got too slow. So I dropped in my old 4770k, and run it at like 3.6Ghz or something. Uses a little more power for the extra cores, but it makes web browsing a lot smoother.
 

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