Intel's Post-Haswell Roadmap Surfaces from Chinese Source

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InvalidError

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AFAIK, there has never been a new DRAM standard without a new CPU socket on Intel platforms since Intel integrated the memory controller in the CPU. Intel is not particularly big on supporting multiple generations of memory specs in their chips.

Changing sockets with DRAM standard is a simple way of guaranteeing the CPU cannot be paired with the wrong type of RAM.
 

rohitbaran

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Skylake will likely use a new, undetermined socket type that requires users to replace their motherboards.
That new socket type most likely is Ball Grid Array, i.e. no socket, just soldered CPUs. If it turns out to be so, Intel is screwing over all desktop enthusiasts.
 

childofthekorn

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I remember hearing the same thing.
 

g00fysmiley

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can't wait, will be keeping my 955 black edition until i can get a 14nm chip. really my old 955 is handling everything i play perfectly, only want to switch to 14nm for power savings and to put out less heat. i know it is because most games are console ports these days but still sad that my processor aquired in i beleive it was 2009 is still plays games as well as my wife's new 15 3570k games all look the same and play just as smooth (we both use 2x560's in sli)
 

g00fysmiley

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can't wait, will be keeping my 955 black edition until i can get a 14nm chip. really my old 955 is handling everything i play perfectly, only want to switch to 14nm for power savings and to put out less heat. i know it is because most games are console ports these days but still sad that my processor aquired in i beleive it was 2009 is still plays games as well as my wife's new 15 3570k games all look the same and play just as smooth (we both use 2x560's in sli)
 

MANOFKRYPTONAK

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I don't really see any reason for me to upgrade yet with a sandy i7 and a 680. But I am sorely tempted by the ivy-e and haswell-e. I will just have to wait and save... I am just a poor college student.
 

CaedenV

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BGA will essentially be limited to Broadwell chips. This is for a multitude of reasons, but the largest one is becuase Broadwell is mostly designed for the mobile space in mind. That means that you will still be able to get an overclockable LGA 1150 Haswell chip during that time for performance users, while Broadwell will find it's way into the hands of PC makers like dell, hp, asus, acer, etc as their customers typically do not change out hardware. With a die shrink and BGA packaging it means that Broadwell will be a much cheaper chip to produce for the masses, and as it will not be in an OC friendly enviornment they will also be able to let some of their insanely high QC standards lax a little bit for a product line.
When Skylake comes out then we will see a return to LGA for desktop users. By this time Intel will have the die shrink figured out and QC up to par, and they will have a new die design that can focus more on performance than mobility.

Of course, it is still far enough away that Intel could still change their mind, but that is how I have seen it coming for a while now.
Haswell -> consumer chip
Broadwell -> Cheap ARM killer
Skylake-> A return to the consumer market
Skymont-> first mainstream Intel SOC??? Definately a mobile focus
next gen-> the end of traditional 'consumer' chips?
 

marrawan

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The picture says that Skylake is LGA not BGA!
 

InvalidError

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The majority of socketed motherboards never see CPU upgrades either and are increasingly less likely to do so with each new generation. The loss of CPU socket is something only a small fraction of the PC marketplace would notice. The amount of processing power improvement over most platforms' lifespan is generally not worth it unless you are stepping up from Celeron/Pentium to i5/i7... most people who bought i5-2xxx have decided to skip i5/7-3xxx.

So I would not be surprised if BGA Broadwell ended up having a much more positive reception across a much wider chunk of the market than most people on THG would expect - assuming Intel passes the savings from integrating the chipset in the CPU and forgoing the socket interface down to OEMs and consumers.
 

ojas

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No, it only says that for "Haswell Refresh", which isn't Broadwell since that's 14nm, and the slide covers it under 22nm. For Haswell-E and Skylake, it just says "LGA". Broadwell is detailed at the bottom (pinkish-purple strip) that says "BGA".


No they don't think that.


Broadwell will not launch for LGA most likely (look at the strip at the bottom saying BGA), in that time we'll get a Haswell refresh for LGA 1150 and Haswell-E on a new LGA socket, just like Skylake after that. Both will likely support DDR4.

I think CaedenV's and InvalidError's comments make most sense and are pretty much aligned with what i've been able to figure out so far.

Except that Intel's mainstream SoC is already out, though the ARM-killer in the tablet space is likely to be Bay Trail this year, and something Broadwell based next year for phones.

A Skylake-based SoC by Intel before ARM stuff hits 16nm, in addition to Tegra 6 (with Volta integrated) and AMD's perfected HSA SoC will probably decimate the rest of the ARM crowd, imo.

TSMC's next shrink is likely to be 20nm anyway, i don't see them jumping from 28 to 16 in one go. 16nm is still in the design stage, apparently. Intel was designing Tri-gate in the 90's! :S
 

MANOFKRYPTONAK

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Ha ha couldn't agree more
 
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