Question Internet connection details different from router

so I'm not sure what I am looking at but...

is the static IP displayed on the right info card the one you're paying for?

I don't really see the issue. if the right card is your router all seems to be in order? it's a IPv4 address, possibly satic and most likely NAT enabled. your pc of course has a different gateway than you're reader. and got a different subnet.
 

kanishknishar

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so I'm not sure what I am looking at but...

is the static IP displayed on the right info card the one you're paying for?

I don't really see the issue. if the right card is your router all seems to be in order? it's a IPv4 address, possibly satic and most likely NAT enabled. your pc of course has a different gateway than you're reader. and got a different subnet.

Shouldn't my PC's IP address being shown my static IP instead of the default IP address.
I ask because I want to enable port forwarding. How do I do that if my PC's not showing the static IP?
 
The only way you will get a static public IP on the PC itself is if there some way to plug your PC into the internet connection directly. I suspect this will not be possible in your case because it is running PPPoE which means you likely have DSL or something that is not a cable modem.

So the static public IP you pay for is assigned to your router.

If you want a static IP on your actual PC you must configure this yourself. Note this will be a private static IP but it allows you to port forward. You can either define a static IP with DHCP or you can set it in the pc nic setting which ever method you prefer.
 
the reason you need/use port forwarding is that you actually don't use your static IP on your computer but have a router with NAT. otherwise there wouldn't be a need to forward the IP address.

you forward a certain port on your router so that any traffic that is sent to your static public IP at a certain port is automatically forwarded and can directly commuicate with the computer although the computer is in a different subnet.

bottom line: there's no issue there. the connection default is Internet --> Static IP on Router WAN-interface --> NAT --> private subnet (most likely 192.168.0.1/24) --> computer with private subnet IP (f.e. 192.168.0.3)

this means you have a static IP and everyone can reach you via this static IP (dunno why you would want that as a private user, but ok); with port forwarding you can direct the traffic if the services you're using behind your NAT require a port forwarding.

assigning a direct public IP to your computer the way you're imagining it would require something like an IP-range/address-block, so you wouldn't have an IP address looking like 1.2.3.4/32 but a block 1.2.3.4/30 instead. but then again, this usually isn't something that's done for residential customers nor is there really a need for it.
 

kanishknishar

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the reason you need/use port forwarding is that you actually don't use your static IP on your computer but have a router with NAT. otherwise there wouldn't be a need to forward the IP address.

you forward a certain port on your router so that any traffic that is sent to your static public IP at a certain port is automatically forwarded and can directly commuicate with the computer although the computer is in a different subnet.

bottom line: there's no issue there. the connection default is Internet --> Static IP on Router WAN-interface --> NAT --> private subnet (most likely 192.168.0.1/24) --> computer with private subnet IP (f.e. 192.168.0.3)

this means you have a static IP and everyone can reach you via this static IP (dunno why you would want that as a private user, but ok); with port forwarding you can direct the traffic if the services you're using behind your NAT require a port forwarding.

assigning a direct public IP to your computer the way you're imagining it would require something like an IP-range/address-block, so you wouldn't have an IP address looking like 1.2.3.4/32 but a block 1.2.3.4/30 instead. but then again, this usually isn't something that's done for residential customers nor is there really a need for it.
I needed a static IP for port-forwarding for torrenting.
 

kanishknishar

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The only way you will get a static public IP on the PC itself is if there some way to plug your PC into the internet connection directly. I suspect this will not be possible in your case because it is running PPPoE which means you likely have DSL or something that is not a cable modem.

So the static public IP you pay for is assigned to your router.

If you want a static IP on your actual PC you must configure this yourself. Note this will be a private static IP but it allows you to port forward. You can either define a static IP with DHCP or you can set it in the pc nic setting which ever method you prefer.
View: https://imgur.com/a/5PS5hFx


What would I do next?
 
I needed a static IP for port-forwarding for torrenting.
you don't.

once again:

  • port forwarding only works with NAT active. that's the whole reason you're doing port forwarding. if your computer has the static IP assigned there's no ports to be forwarded -- because there's nowhere to forward them to. if your computer has the address 1.2.3.4 and is contacted on port 5, there's no address where this port can be forwarded to.
  • you don't need a static IP for torrenting. how do I know? I don't have a static IP and it works just fine. static IPs are used to access a service from the outside, with torrenting this isn't the case since you're the one initiating the contact with your IP information, so dynamic IP isn't really an issue
if your torrenting client can't establish a connection there's a lot of possible issues -- your computer not having the public static IP isn't one of them.

you can assign an internal static IP to your computer to make forwarding easier (usually that isn't neccessary) -- anything between 192.168.0.2 - 192.168.0.254 works, although I'd not take an address in the DHCP range of your router if you configure it in windows. or you can assign an address of your DHCP range to your MAC address. frankly I'd rather configure the IP in Windows but both works.
then again, there shouldn't be a need for this. enabling port mapping in your torrent client is typically sufficient.
 

kanishknishar

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you don't.

once again:

  • port forwarding only works with NAT active. that's the whole reason you're doing port forwarding. if your computer has the static IP assigned there's no ports to be forwarded -- because there's nowhere to forward them to. if your computer has the address 1.2.3.4 and is contacted on port 5, there's no address where this port can be forwarded to.
  • you don't need a static IP for torrenting. how do I know? I don't have a static IP and it works just fine. static IPs are used to access a service from the outside, with torrenting this isn't the case since you're the one initiating the contact with your IP information, so dynamic IP isn't really an issue
if your torrenting client can't establish a connection there's a lot of possible issues -- your computer not having the public static IP isn't one of them.

you can assign an internal static IP to your computer to make forwarding easier (usually that isn't neccessary) -- anything between 192.168.0.2 - 192.168.0.254 works, although I'd not take an address in the DHCP range of your router if you configure it in windows. or you can assign an address of your DHCP range to your MAC address. frankly I'd rather configure the IP in Windows but both works.
then again, there shouldn't be a need for this. enabling port mapping in your torrent client is typically sufficient.
Port forwarding allows for better uploading - necessary when using private trackers. My computer does have a static IP as I can see from my wireless router.

Are you saying that port forwarding isn't possible with a static IP?
 
Port forwarding allows for better uploading - necessary when using private trackers. My computer does have a static IP as I can see from my wireless router.

Are you saying that port forwarding isn't possible with a static IP?
Port Forwarding exists for incoming traffic. Outgoing traffic doesn't require forwarding -- and doesn't work frankly. Forwarding exists so that traffic can communicate directly with a device behind your NAT.


Think of it like post delivery:

if you have a public IP address that is directly assigned to your computer (not your router, your computer) because you got for example a /30 network, it's like you're living in the suburbs. 1 family home, mail gets directly addressed to you. so "Fakestreet 123" is your unique address.

if you live in an apartment block downtown on "downtownfakestreet 123" and I address a letter to you at that address the post man won't know who to deliver it to. You might be living in a rich fancy building and there's a doorman that also handles the post. so he sees it's addressed to your name and delivers it to your door, since he knows in which appartment you live --- I, when sending you a letter, do not. I only know the house you're living in. That's what NAT does basically.

if I address it to "downtownfakestreet 123, apartment C" and there's a floor plan in the entry that says apartment C is on the 3rd floor to the right and the postman is therefore able to deliver it there themselves - that's port forwarding.


Port Forwarding for incoming traffic can be crucial. you can't forward outgoing traffic.
if you need a port forward since you got a /32 network like most of us do:

  • assign your computer a static IP. the easiest way to do so is via Windows. press Windows-key+R, the window "Run" shows up. Enter "ncpa.cpl" and hit enter. you come to your network adapter settings. Right click on the connection and select "properties". Mark "internet protocol version 4" and hit "properties" again. Check "set manually" or "use the following:" and enter a free IP address like 192.168.0.150, subnet mask 255.255.255.0 and the Gateway address (in your case most likely 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.0.254). Voilà you've assigned a static IP in your network. here if you require a youtube tutorial
  • now you go to your router and set a port forwarding for all incoming traffic at port [whatever port you've set in your torrent client] to be forwarded to 192.168.0.150 (or whatever address you've chosen)
all incoming traffic on port X is now forwarded to your machine.
 

kanishknishar

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Port Forwarding exists for incoming traffic. Outgoing traffic doesn't require forwarding -- and doesn't work frankly. Forwarding exists so that traffic can communicate directly with a device behind your NAT.


Think of it like post delivery:

if you have a public IP address that is directly assigned to your computer (not your router, your computer) because you got for example a /30 network, it's like you're living in the suburbs. 1 family home, mail gets directly addressed to you. so "Fakestreet 123" is your unique address.

if you live in an apartment block downtown on "downtownfakestreet 123" and I address a letter to you at that address the post man won't know who to deliver it to. You might be living in a rich fancy building and there's a doorman that also handles the post. so he sees it's addressed to your name and delivers it to your door, since he knows in which appartment you live --- I, when sending you a letter, do not. I only know the house you're living in. That's what NAT does basically.

if I address it to "downtownfakestreet 123, apartment C" and there's a floor plan in the entry that says apartment C is on the 3rd floor to the right and the postman is therefore able to deliver it there themselves - that's port forwarding.


Port Forwarding for incoming traffic can be crucial. you can't forward outgoing traffic.
if you need a port forward since you got a /32 network like most of us do:

  • assign your computer a static IP. the easiest way to do so is via Windows. press Windows-key+R, the window "Run" shows up. Enter "ncpa.cpl" and hit enter. you come to your network adapter settings. Right click on the connection and select "properties". Mark "internet protocol version 4" and hit "properties" again. Check "set manually" or "use the following:" and enter a free IP address like 192.168.0.150, subnet mask 255.255.255.0 and the Gateway address (in your case most likely 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.0.254). Voilà you've assigned a static IP in your network. here if you require a youtube tutorial
  • now you go to your router and set a port forwarding for all incoming traffic at port [whatever port you've set in your torrent client] to be forwarded to 192.168.0.150 (or whatever address you've chosen)
all incoming traffic on port X is now forwarded to your machine.
But that is why I mentioned seeding. I need port forwarding so that I can seed torrents better.

Also I have a static IP which I want to utilize not a free IP. So what should I do then?
 

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