Question Internet speeds fluctuate and awful ping on computers and console gaming

Kyriim

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okay so here’s 3 recent speed test
I’m suppose to be getting 50mbps
Sometimes I get up to that speed but not for long it’s always fluctuating mostly in the lower 20s

in every game no matter pc or console my ping is always 150 or higher mostly 250
And on the speed test it goes from 20-80 ping
I’m currently using a two in one modem/router I just ordered a new router today that has dual band 2.4 and 5ghz

my internet provider is the only one I have to choose from.
i can upgrade to the 150mbps if that would fix it but I don’t think that’s my problem. I’m paying for 50mbps and not even getting half of that most of the time
We have 3 Rokus, a 4K tv and 2 smart TVs
We’re about to get two pcs and I’m trying to fix the internet before I finish building them. We also are using the google WiFi extenders(which I think might be all the problem) I don’t know. Everything is on wifi no wired connections at all
Please any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

kanewolf

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The only way to reliably test performance is with a wired connection to your router. Any WIFI connection has too much local variability.

You need to get the TVs on wired connectivity. Your rokus also if they have wired ports. Streaming on WIFI is a bad idea.
 

gggplaya

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Streaming on TV is fine via wifi. Most 1080p streams are only 6-8mbps, which is nothing. 4k streams are usually highly compressed and done at around 15mbps. None of my tv's have problems, though I'm using several access points in the house each with an ethernet backhaul. Every room has wireless AC access and gets 200mbps minimum wifi.

The OP's problem is that mesh systems have terrible bandwidth. Sure they're fine for smartphones and tablets, but are terrible for bandwidth hog devices. For instance, if someone is downloading a console update and that node only gets 30mbps, everyone else on that node will slow to a crawl and mesh nodes further down stream will also slow to a crawl. If the downstream mesh node can find another path to the main router, it might take it but that path is usually a much weaker signal and give connectivity issues. It can be a real mess.

To test your actual speed, disconnect power from all but the main wifi router. Stand next to it, then do your speedtest with your phone. You should get 50mbps or whatever your max is. If you get good speeds there, I would look at wiring the mesh nodes with a wired backahul. You can use MOCA(cable coaxial lines) or powerline adapters. Make sure you change the settings in the google menu's to ensure it's running ethernet backhaul. That should solve your bandwidth issues.
 

Kyriim

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Streaming on TV is fine via wifi. Most 1080p streams are only 6-8mbps, which is nothing. 4k streams are usually highly compressed and done at around 15mbps. None of my tv's have problems, though I'm using several access points in the house each with an ethernet backhaul. Every room has wireless AC access and gets 200mbps minimum wifi.

The OP's problem is that mesh systems have terrible bandwidth. Sure they're fine for smartphones and tablets, but are terrible for bandwidth hog devices. For instance, if someone is downloading a console update and that node only gets 30mbps, everyone else on that node will slow to a crawl and mesh nodes further down stream will also slow to a crawl. If the downstream mesh node can find another path to the main router, it might take it but that path is usually a much weaker signal and give connectivity issues. It can be a real mess.

To test your actual speed, disconnect power from all but the main wifi router. Stand next to it, then do your speedtest with your phone. You should get 50mbps or whatever your max is. If you get good speeds there, I would look at wiring the mesh nodes with a wired backahul. You can use MOCA(cable coaxial lines) or powerline adapters. Make sure you change the settings in the google menu's to ensure it's running ethernet backhaul. That should solve your bandwidth issues.
Well I should be able to get rid of all the google WiFi’s with the new router. Even with the new better router should I still get the power line adaptors?
 

kanewolf

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Well I should be able to get rid of all the google WiFi’s with the new router. Even with the new better router should I still get the power line adaptors?
A "better" router may not change the WIFI coverage. Most routers already meet the govt mandated maximums for transmit power. Additionally, the transmit power on your devices, is much lower. Even if your phone can get a signal, it may not be able to broadcast back resulting in poor performance.
If you have coax in the house, you should look at MoCA adapters. They are similar to powerline but they use the coax infrastructure you have.
 

Kyriim

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A "better" router may not change the WIFI coverage. Most routers already meet the govt mandated maximums for transmit power. Additionally, the transmit power on your devices, is much lower. Even if your phone can get a signal, it may not be able to broadcast back resulting in poor performance.
If you have coax in the house, you should look at MoCA adapters. They are similar to powerline but they use the coax infrastructure you have.
Well I can’t use mocha adapters because I recently just had an addition built onto my house and do not have any cable connections in that part of the house.
 

Kyriim

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It will depend on how you had the electrical wiring for the addition done. The best thing to do is to buy a set of AV2 adapters at a brick-and-mortar store. Test them and if they don't work return them.
Okay thank you I’ll try that out after the new router.
 

gggplaya

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I don't think you need to buy a new router at all, you can try the system you have with powerline/ethernet backhaul. When using a wired backhaul, you won't have problems downstream if 1 node is maxing out it's bandwidth. Each node will use the wired backhaul to the main router for bandwidth. The only thing a mesh system will do for you at this point is try to achieve a smooth handoff from access point to access point as you move further away from one and closer to the other. Also, they'll try to operate at different wifi channels automatically. Essentially acting as access points that communicate and play well together.

Powerline adapters should work as long as the new addition shares the same circuit breaker panel box as the main house? They can also work through a sub panel as long as that sub panel is wired to a large breaker in the main panel box.

If you have amazon prime, you can buy powerline adapters and return them easily if they don't work.

If your new addition shares attic space with the main house, it's actually really easy to run ethernet cable. I've down it for several houses. It doesn't have to share the whole attic, but usually where the roof's intersect, there is a hole big enough to get a wire through.
 

Kyriim

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I don't think you need to buy a new router at all, you can try the system you have with powerline/ethernet backhaul. When using a wired backhaul, you won't have problems downstream if 1 node is maxing out it's bandwidth. Each node will use the wired backhaul to the main router for bandwidth. The only thing a mesh system will do for you at this point is try to achieve a smooth handoff from access point to access point as you move further away from one and closer to the other. Also, they'll try to operate at different wifi channels automatically. Essentially acting as access points that communicate and play well together.

Powerline adapters should work as long as the new addition shares the same circuit breaker panel box as the main house? They can also work through a sub panel as long as that sub panel is wired to a large breaker in the main panel box.

If you have amazon prime, you can buy powerline adapters and return them easily if they don't work.

If your new addition shares attic space with the main house, it's actually really easy to run ethernet cable. I've down it for several houses. It doesn't have to share the whole attic, but usually where the roof's intersect, there is a hole big enough to get a wire through.
where do you take the cable through once in the addition
 
Running cable in the attic depends greatly on what you can actually access. I had one wall I wanted to run cables in and crawled all the way to edge of the attic only to find there was not enough room to get a drill and bit in and had to cut a hole in the wall and do it from the bottom.
What you want is some wall you can some how get to the top of. It is best if it is a internal wall because external walls have insulation in them. Spray foam insulation makes it extremely hard to run wires. A internal wall is empty and you can just push the wire down and cut a hole for a box and fish around to find the wire. It is not real hard just lots of careful measuring and being careful to not damage anything...or fall through the ceiling.
 
I think your Internet might be just fine--you really need to do a wired speedtest fast.com dslreports.com/speedtest and packetlosstest.com. If these are all okay, then you just need a good 'wired' backbone which will be very simple with powerlines.
 

gggplaya

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Most of the time, I just bring a wire straight up through a closet, close to the door side inner wall. Then just guerilla tape the wire to the wall and up into the attic. No one will see it unless you walk into the closest, but no one cares when they do see it since it's in a closet. Once the wire's in the closet, just drill straight from the inside wall to the outside wall and place a wall plate on the outside wall to make it look professional outside. Most attics have blown in insulation, so it was easy to move aside and see where the drill bit came up through. Fiberglass batts can also be pulled up, but spray foam will be harder to see. You'll probably need a very long drill bit for spray foam.

I use these: https://www.amazon.com/Voltage-Mounting-Fosmon-Included-Telephone/dp/B01N6CFES0

Along with these plates: https://www.amazon.com/Cable-Matters-10-Pack-Profile-Keystone/dp/B074HHDJWT

Keystone jacks: https://www.amazon.com/Cable-Matters-Listed-10-Pack-Keystone/dp/B00IO3HEN6

Punch tool: https://www.amazon.com/Cable-Matters-Punch-Down-Blade/dp/B0072K1QHM

Punch Stand: https://www.amazon.com/Cable-Matters-Keystone-Punch-Stand/dp/B00MHWRYMQ

Punching keystone's is easy, just follow the same color codes for each side and plan on screwing up your first one, but each one after that will be fine:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0gxNZoPcnP4
 

Kyriim

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I upgraded to 150mbps
So I also figured something else out today,
My google WiFi app is showing 115mbps while ookla speed test is showing around 15-20mbps why is this? Is there any fix?
 

gggplaya

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Did you test that standing next to the main router?

The google system will show you the linkrate to the node you're connected to, but with any repeater or mesh system your connection could have bottlenecks further down stream before it reaches the main router. That's why I never advocate these mesh or repeater systems.

If that speetest was while standing next to the main router, then you have other problems.
 

Kyriim

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Did you test that standing next to the main router?

The google system will show you the linkrate to the node you're connected to, but with any repeater or mesh system your connection could have bottlenecks further down stream before it reaches the main router. That's why I never advocate these mesh or repeater systems.

If that speetest was while standing next to the main router, then you have other problems.
i have a modem/router combo and i have the first node plugged into it and while standing beside of it i done multiple test

mostly below 20s and i got one 60mbps
 

gggplaya

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aws condo is only wired for Coax, a
i have a modem/router combo and i have the first node plugged into it and while standing beside of it i done multiple test

mostly below 20s and i got one 60mbps
Did you make sure your router/modem is in bridge mode? If you have your google system set also as a router, then you might be double NAT'd which would cause issues.

Either set your router/modem to bridge mode or change your google system to make sure it's only in access point mode.
 

Kyriim

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Did you make sure your router/modem is in bridge mode? If you have your google system set also as a router, then you might be double NAT'd which would cause issues.

Either set your router/modem to bridge mode or change your google system to make sure it's only in access point mode.
okay ill check that, i didnt set up the google nodes so im not 100% sure how its set up but i bet they didnt bridge it.
 

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