Is a 2019 Laptop a downgrade from my 2013 Desktop?

Jun 16, 2019
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Hey,

I'm considering buying a laptop for some mobility. It will primarily be used for work-related tasks, let me list:

Multi-tasking between Photoshop, up to 30-50 Chrome Tabs (at least 10 tabs on average including G-Drive Sheets, Docs, Gmail, Youtube etc.), Thunderbird, PuTTy, Notepad++, Illustrator, Spotify, Discord, The occasional League Of Legends Game.

I'm currently still using my 2013 built PC which is honestly running the above perfectly "fine" for my needs. A bit faster wouldn't hurt, but main problem is that I'm not mobile.

Specs:
CPU: i3-3225 (Dual core)
Ram: 8GB 13xx mhz, ddr3
Storage: 500GB SSD Evo 9xx Samsung
GFX: GTX 970

The laptop I'm considering to get is a Lenovo E590:
CPU: i7-8565U
Ram: 16GB 2400mhz ddr4
Storage: 500GB SSD PCIe
GFX: AMD RX 550 2GB GDDR5

I know that a Desktop will always crush a laptop, but how would the 2019 laptop match up against my old out-dated desktop pc - with my tasks in mind?
 
Jun 16, 2019
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CPU and RAM-wise you'd be better off. Storage is more an academic difference (from my experience anyway). Where you're worse off is the GPU.

Overall the Lenovo a better laptop for work purposes.
My worry was that even a quad-core mobile CPU wouldn't be as good as the Desktop Dual core cpu. Same goes for ram, that maybe the 8gb desktop ram would be better than 16 gig of mobile ram?
 
I would still say the CPU and RAM aspects are better than the desktop.
https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/compare.html?productIds=65692,149091
https://cpu.userbenchmark.com/Compare/Intel-Core-i7-8565U-vs-Intel-Core-i3-3225/m591977vs1488
https://www.cpubenchmark.net/singleThread.html

Keep in mind the laptop is using newer tech and advances have been made. RAM is also one of those things where it isn't a problem until you run out of it. For content creation purposes the more RAM the better (certainly in my experience).
 

fagetti

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Mar 1, 2018
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What is your motherboard? You can basically double your i3 cpu benchmark by changing just cpu to i7 even without overclocking and you get near triple that benchmark if you overclock it ( i7-2600k example) with very little money around 100 euros.
DDR3 ram is also not expensive, i would assume your board supports up to 16gb and higher speeds than 1333mhz, probably up to 2400mhz

This will not make your desktop compatible but you might upgrade it aswell as getting a laptop. Point is you can upgrade your desktop ahead of that laptop if you want to with little money

(edit this all depends on your motherboard)
 
Laptop SHOULD handle the workload ok - the modern u-series laptops are pretty strong performers since they went 4c, but you can always step up to the i7-8750h laptops for even more power. You can find some for around $600 these days, with a much more powerful GPU than the 550 too.

Also not hard to drop an i5/i7 into that desktop to keep it around as well...maybe lessening the need for less of a workhorse laptop.
 

fagetti

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Mar 1, 2018
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If your motherboard dont support overclocking or you dont want to do it, pick an non "k" model i7 like i7-3770 or i7-2600 for cheaper.
If your desktop motherboard supports overclocking and you want to try it then take a "k" model i7-3770k or i7-2600k or i7-2700k

Even without overclocking its a huge improvement : https://www.cpubenchmark.net/compare/Intel-i3-3225-vs-Intel-i7-3770/1474vs896
If you overclock you get around 15-20% more than stock. However there is other things at play like your motherboard , power supply quality and cooling.
 

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