[SOLVED] Is AeroCool Cylon Pro Tempered Glass RGB safe?

Nov 29, 2019
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I initially ordered a coolermaster from the shop but they don't have it so I'm thinking to replace it with the AeroCool Cylon Pro Tempered Glass RGB. I saw it in a video and I'd admit it's really cool. There are a few things that worry me though.

1. Can the rgb light break and stop working if I have the case open for too long? (months)

2. Is the rgb light too much for the eyes? The Christmas tree lights we have switch colours too and are kinda annoying for my eye but they tend to pump very fast and I can't stand them, I think the rgb doesn't do that.

3. Is there an electrocute risk if you touch the light with moisture/water hands?

I will either buy the aerocool or cougar mx330
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
I guess you meant on rather then open? I mean, eventually, sure, but LED lifespans can be measured in decades.

Incandescent bulbs fail due to metal fatigue. Why they usually fail when turned on or off. If they are kept on at low power they can also last a very long time.
Florescent and LED light bulbs fail because because of their power supplies.
LEDs have to take AC and turn it into DC (And the cheap ones do a poor job of it)
Florescent bulbs take 'low' voltage AC and convert it to high voltage AC.
Christmas tree lights are cheap. They are using LEDs in large series/parallel strings and powering them directly from AC. That is why they flicker. Whenever the sine wave goes negative the LEDs are 'off' but still actually blocking all the current. So they turn on and off at half the frequency of the input power. This is a lot of stress of the LEDs and why they tend to fail.

In a PC, they are getting consistent DC power from your nicely filtered Power Supply. Depending on how it is wired, LEDs can even fail and the rest of them can keep working. Should be in parallel if they are running off of 5V, but possibly series/parallel if they are running off of 12V.
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
I'm not sure of your first question. Why would it break?

Only you can judge what you think of as too bright. You don't have to plug it in... It will be running off of DC, so it shouldn't have the 25/30hz blinking that LEDs run directly from AC current are.

The voltage is low, and the power is low. Little danger. Also you aren't touching the circuitry directly, that is a plastic diffuser of some sort on the front of the case.
 
Reactions: undeadlord

Eximo

Titan
Herald
I guess you meant on rather then open? I mean, eventually, sure, but LED lifespans can be measured in decades.

Incandescent bulbs fail due to metal fatigue. Why they usually fail when turned on or off. If they are kept on at low power they can also last a very long time.
Florescent and LED light bulbs fail because because of their power supplies.
LEDs have to take AC and turn it into DC (And the cheap ones do a poor job of it)
Florescent bulbs take 'low' voltage AC and convert it to high voltage AC.
Christmas tree lights are cheap. They are using LEDs in large series/parallel strings and powering them directly from AC. That is why they flicker. Whenever the sine wave goes negative the LEDs are 'off' but still actually blocking all the current. So they turn on and off at half the frequency of the input power. This is a lot of stress of the LEDs and why they tend to fail.

In a PC, they are getting consistent DC power from your nicely filtered Power Supply. Depending on how it is wired, LEDs can even fail and the rest of them can keep working. Should be in parallel if they are running off of 5V, but possibly series/parallel if they are running off of 12V.
 

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